A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

A Tale of Two Cities

'Liberty, equality, fraternity, or death; -- the last, much the easiest to bestow, O Guillotine!' After eighteen years as a political prisoner in the Bastille, the ageing Doctor Manette is finally released and reunited with his daughter in England. There the lives of two very different men, Charles Darnay, an exiled French aristocrat, and Sydney Carton, a disreputable but brilliant English lawyer, become enmeshed through their love for Lucie Mane...


Details A Tale of Two Cities

TitleA Tale of Two Cities
ISBN9780141439600
Author
Release DateJan 30th, 2003
PublisherPenguin
LanguageEnglish
Number of pages489 pages
GenreClassics, Fiction, Historical Fiction, Literature, Historical, Academic, School, Novels, Classic Literature, European Literature, British Literature, 19th Century
Rating

Reviews A Tale of Two Cities

  • Melissa Rudder
    2008-01-23
    My primary goal when I'm teaching A Tale of Two Cities to my sophomores is to make them realize that Charles Dickens didn't write creaky, dusty long novels that teachers embraced as a twisted rite of passage for teenagers. Instead, I want them them to understand why Dickens was one of the most popular writers in England and America during his time. I want them to see the book as the suspenseful, comedic, and sentimental piece of entertainment tha...
  • Emma
    2012-04-25
    Christ on a bike - I’d forgotten how much concentration Dickens demands.   Reading the first few chapters of this book was, frankly, a chore. I could not be less bothered about The Mail and the more Dickens banged on about that never ending carriage journey the more I daydreamed about the next book I was going to read once this torture was over. I’m glad I didn’t give up though because as soon as we hit France and the wine shop I was hook...
  • Leslie
    2008-02-09
    Most satisfying ending in the English language. Yes, the last line is a classic ("It is a far, far better thing ..."), concluding, in astonishingly concise language (for Dickens), the peace and redemption of the story's most poignant romantic hero. But this novel delivers such a gratifying experience because there are, in fact, many characters who cover significant emotional ground in their journey to love one woman as best they can. Lucie's fath...
  • Lyn
    2011-12-01
    Hundreds, thousands of stories long to have a quotable verse, just one. Tale of Two Cities, Dickens masterpiece as far as I'm concerned, is bookended by two of the most recognizable quotes in all of English language. This is also the darkest story I have read of his, and no doubt, it's about the bloody French Revolution and Dickens spares none of his acerbic wit to demonize what was rightly demonic. Yet, to his credit and genius, neither does he ...
  • Laura
    2008-06-12
    Years of teaching this novel to teenagers never dimmed my thrill in reading it — if anything, I grew to love it more every time I watched kids gasp aloud at the revelations! Critics are divided on its place in the Dickens canon, but the ones who think it an inferior work are simply deranged. It has everything: dark deeds, revolution, madness, love, thwarted love, forgiveness, revenge, and a stunning act of self-sacrifice. And melodrama! Oh, how...
  • Kalliope
    2015-06-29
    A TALE OF TWO TALES Reading Dickens’s approach to historical fiction, at first I could not help but remember Romola, which I read recently. And even if Romola seemed to have more of a Victorian than a Florentine Renaissance tone, the story and the context were very nicely woven together. While with A Tale I felt I as reading two separate stories. One was a the result of conscientious research, and Dickens in his Preface acknowledges Carlyle’s...
  • Jason Koivu
    2008-11-22
    Hands down my favorite Dickens' I've read yet! It's got love, sacrifice, revenge, revolt and other exciting verbs! I'm a big fan of a solid marriage between character development and action. A Tale of Two Cities is well-wed. Some criticize Dickens for his trite stories and overblown caricature-esque characters. Yes, the man wrote some less-than-perfect books. He wrote them for a wide-ranging public and he wrote for money. High-minded prose eloque...
  • فهد الفهد
    2012-02-03
    قصة مدينتين استعرت هذه الرواية من مكتبة الجامعة في بداية الألفية، كان ذلك قبل عالم الانترنت، عندما كنا لا نلتقي ولا نتعرف على الكتب ومشاهير المؤلفين إلا من خلال الصحف أو الكتب التي تسقط بين أيدينا اتفاقاً، ديكنز كان مألوفاً لي حينها، كنت قد قرأت ل...
  • Jean
    2016-12-22
    “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness ... it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair”So begins A Tale of Two Cities, a perennial favourite. It was an instant success when it was first published, and its popularity has remained steady ever since, as one of the best selling novels of all time. For many, it is their most loved novel by Charles Dickens. A Tale of...
  • Pouting Always
    2017-03-07
    Some how my review of this got deleted which is good because I think after sitting a while I can appreciate the book more. When I read it it was confusing and slow and then towards the end really picked up and I was kind of disoriented but it gives a really good view into things in the period before the French Revolution. Learning about it was one thing but reading this made me very sympathetic of the peasants and angry on thier behave, honestly ...
  • Erik
    2010-02-16
    A Tale of Two Cities holds the dubious honor of being the first book I ever picked up and failed to finish. The very first.From there, it's all gone downhill. Just look at my reviews where I casually admit to throwing away classics unread. A Light in August, Lolita, The Elegance of the Hedgehog, etc, etc...If you enjoy the little things, like being sane and not hating life, then I recommend you never pick this up.
  • Stephen
    2010-03-05
    6.0 stars. This was the first Charles Dickens novel I have ever read and I ABSOLUTELY LOVED IT!!! After reading this, I immediately decided that I would plan on reading the rest of Dickens books (hopefully one every couple of months until I get through them all. I was completely amazed by his characters who came instantly to life for me and about whose hopes and fears I found myself truly caring. Equally impressive was Dickens' plotting and overa...
  • Apatt
    2009-06-25
    It was the best of a far, far, FAR better thing that I do, than I have ever done.I know that’s lame, but I’m out of ideas for an opening paragraph.This is my second reading of A Tale of Two Cities and I doubt it will be my last. A lot of people who habitually read for pleasure probably would not consider reading this book because it is required reading in many schools and it would seem like anathema to a good time to read it when you don’t ...
  • Brad
    2008-03-25
    A painful beast of a book. It took me five attempts to get past page one hundred, and when I finally did break that barrier I pressed on until the very end so that I didn't have to suffer ever again.Dickens is a problem for me. I admit it freely.There was a time, many years ago, when I was a fan. I read Great Expectations for the first time in grade four, and I was in love with the book and Dickens. And I imagine that some part of my social consc...
  • Michelle
    2016-02-21
    I first read this in high school as a substitute for "Oliver Twist" which was not in my high school library catalog (it was in the elementary school catalog). Come to think of it now, I have never read that book. Weird... If ever I get a chance to meet "high-school-me", I bet she will be over the moon and back to know that the world is her library! Any book, on demand! I guess it would distract her enough not to realize she's living an almost her...
  • Annie
    2014-11-05
    It was the best of times, it was the worst of times… These lines will perhaps haunt me for the rest of my life. A Tale of Two Cities is a delicious plate of my mom’s best hotch-potch served in the biting cold of a grey December. Set in the backdrop of the French Revolution, with poverty, hunger, debauchery spreading like a dark mist over the country, and by contrast an idyllic England. It’s a story of love, of endurance and friendship, of t...
  • Danger
    2011-03-28
    About 30 pages into this book, I was struck with a moment of panic:WHAT'S GOING ON HERE? WHERE THE HELL IS GARFIELD?!?Had the lasagna-loving feline been uncerimoniously behead on the guillotine before the happenings of page 1? Without my favorite cartoon cat's wry, laid-back sense of wit these are surely THE WORST OF TIMES!That is when I realized I was reading the classic text A Tale of Two CITIES, by Charles Dickens and not watching the 2006 cin...
  • Michael
    2010-04-26
    What a book! After reading this, I've come to appreciate Charles Dickens as so much more than "that guy who wrote the Christmas Carol."One thing I love is his ability to create a perfect storyline. Everything in this book fits together in the end like a perfect, intricate puzzle. Components that were thought to be gratuitous at first will come back in major ways at later points in the book. Maybe it's just me, but I adore authors who blatantly sh...
  • David
    2011-06-09
    This is another one of those Charles Dickens classics I was supposed to read as a kid and never did. Since I've never seen any of the movies either, it was actually pretty unspoiled for me, though I did know how it ends (anyone growing up in the English-speaking world can hardly have avoided knowing Sydney Carton's famous last lines: "It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I ...
  • Sidharth Vardhan
    2013-06-08
    “No man ever really loved a woman, lost her, and knew her with a blameless though an unchanged mind, when she was a wife and a mother, but her children had a strange sympathy with him—an instinctive delicacy of pity for him. What fine hidden sensibilities are touched in such a case, no echoes tell; but it is so, and it was so here. Carton was the first stranger to whom little Lucie held out her chubby arms, and he kept his place with her as s...
  • di
    2010-04-07
    Picking up this book was a brave move. The only Dickens I'd ever managed to plod my way through was Great Expectations. My expectations weren't great and unfortunately it didn't exceed them (probably been tainted by the film version with Gwyneth Paltrow where everything is green). I tried Hard Times and didn't get very far (a poor choice for a novice I'll bet--should have known from the title). I know the general gist of many of his other books a...
  • Algernon
    2015-05-05
    After having a great experience last year reading “Bleak House”, I managed to built up great expectations for my next Dickens project. After all, “A Tale of Two Cities” is probably the most famous story by the prolific author. And I am really keen to learn more, to put some order in my sketchy picture of the French Revolution. Sadly, the expectations were only partially fulfilled. I didn’t really enjoy the journey, and a final four star...
  • peiman-mir5 rezakhani
    2016-08-12
    دوستانِ گرانقدر، میتوان گفت که این کتاب ارزنده ترین اثرِ زنده یاد «چارلز دیکنز» است... من تا پایانِ داستان نمیدانستم که کدام یک از شخصیت هایِ داستان را به عنوانِ شخصیتِ اصلی انتخاب کنم... و حتی در این موضوع تردید داشتم که موضوع داستان را چگونه انتخاب ...
  • Sue
    2010-04-26
    My latest reading of A Tale of Two Cities, some 50 years after the first (!) confirms my initial rating. This was admittedly like a completely new reading experience, apart from the first and last paragraphs known and remembered by so many English-speaking readers across this world. Dickens' strengths as a writer are confirmed in his descriptive prose but I so much missed the depth of characters and presence of humor recently experienced in Great...
  • Jennifer (aka EM)
    2008-12-06
    Above all else, this is a love story. It is a story of family and friendship and loyalty. It is Dickens at his most florid and most rhetorical, his most humane, his most [melo]dramatic; yet in many ways, his most precise. I vacillate between this and Bleak House as my favourites of his. I would tell you, if you've not read Dickens, to start here. This is as seminal a work in English literature as King Lear or perhaps a more apt comparison, Romeo ...
  • Ahmad Sharabiani
    2009-07-28
    883. A Tale of Two Cities, Charles Dickensداستان دو شهر - چارلز دیکنز (فرزان روز) ادبیاتمترجم: گیورگیس آقاسی؛ تهران، پیروز، 1347، در 300 صمترجم: ابراهیم یونسی؛ تهران، جاویدان، چاپ اول 1346، در 436 ص، چاپ دوم 1355 ، در 570 صمترجم: ابوالفتوح امام؛ تهران، گلشایی، 1362 ، در 520 صمترجم: نا...
  • Obied Alahmed
    2017-01-11
    تحفة رائعة ...لولا أن الكتاب مكانه الرفوف لكانت يجب أن توضع في إحدى الساحات العامة كمثال للإبداع جمال الوصف للأحوال والشخصيات وانسيابية التنقل بين المتناقضات لندن وباريس & جوع وفقر & ثورة وارستقراطية شجون وذكريات اثارتها الرواية ... آآآه ... لكم اشتق...
  • Mary
    2012-04-22
    “A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other" p.47I feel guilty for not liking this book for the first 50-100 pages or so. I don't know what it is with me and "classics", it takes me so long to get into them and I get frustrated and impatient too quickly. For a book with one of the greatest opening paragraphs ever written ("It was the best of times, it was the ...
  • Sparrow
    2008-07-07
    Who are your gods? Whom do you worship in actions, and whom in words? Charles Dickens waggles his finger in my face, the finger of a crone, of a maiden, of a businessman. The polished finger of a marquis, the calloused finger of a knitter. He makes his point with the appropriate number of adjectives and with enough humor to break through the polished shell of morality and reach something true. When you dress your Good up in robes and worship it, ...