The Girl with Seven Names by Hyeonseo Lee

The Girl with Seven Names

An extraordinary insight into life under one of the world’s most ruthless and secretive dictatorships – and the story of one woman’s terrifying struggle to avoid capture/repatriation and guide her family to freedom.As a child growing up in North Korea, Hyeonseo Lee was one of millions trapped by a secretive and brutal totalitarian regime. Her home on the border with China gave her some exposure to the world beyond the confines of the Hermit...

Details The Girl with Seven Names

TitleThe Girl with Seven Names
Release DateJul 2nd, 2015
PublisherWilliam Collins
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Biography

Reviews The Girl with Seven Names

  • Sungeun Jin
    Full Disclosure: I am a South Korean and I have encountered with a number of readings, TED-talks, Youtube videos on life in North Korea, testimonies of North Korean defectors on horrific lives in our neighbor country. However, I found this book intriguing, unique and inspiring. What Hyeonseo offers in this book is quite different from other N.Korean defector's story. She's from a family with high class, had a relatively comfortable life to North ...
  • abby
    By the time she turned 29, Hyeonseo Lee had spent a decade living on the run and in hiding. She had escaped a brothel, survived a kidnapping, run away from a loveless engagement, and changed her name four times. She was attacked on the street, robbed, conned, and arrested more than once.She is one of the lucky ones.Hyeonseo Lee was born in North Korea under a different name, to a family with good songbun (NK's caste system). But even being one of...
  • Dem
    What an interesting story and its so hard to believe that in this day and age that a whole nation of 25.5 Million people could be so cut off from the rest of the world and its leader could controll and dictate everything about peoples lives from birth to death.I had read a couple of books on North Korea over the years and came across The Girl with Seven Names: A North Korean Defector’s Story and another book which I felt were both worth reading...
  • Camie
    If you're like me and haven't read much about past and present living conditions in Northern Korea , you'll learn a lot here.This simply written book follows the courageous journey of a 17 year old girl who will need to change her name seven times after she defects from North Korea and reinvents her life both in China and later South Korea. Written to read like a novel, it will certainly give you a greater appreciation of the freedoms we often ta...
  • Julia Graf
    I did enjoy this but I also feel like she made a lot of really incredibly dumb choices that really made no sense. For example she stayed with relatives in China for 2 whole years (!!!) and didn't think of maybe using that time to get a job to save money, or to learn a vocation? Then she runs away penniless on the spur of the moment and has no plan of what to do. You had 2 years to think about it and relied on the kindness of distant relatives to ...
  • Short Reviews
    This was definitely the best autobiography I've read to date. Hyeonseo is a brave exceptional woman who has been through hell and back. The loyalty and love she has for her family was so lovely to read. I can't even form a proper review- no review will describe how much I loved reading this book!
  • Apratim Mukherjee
    This is the first time I read a North Korean defector's story.I had read about the oppressive regime but the book is an eye opener of all sorts.Though written like a thriller novel,the book tells a lot of suffering that the North Koreans go through in their perilous journey during their defection.The treatment of these defectors in China is a matter of concern for the international community.The book deserves 4 stars ...1 deduction for too much p...
  • Jeannette Nikolova
    Also available on the WondrousBooks blog. Country: North KoreaThis is the second book that I have read, which tells the stories of North Korean defectors, the first being Nothing to Envy. I debated with myself whether I need another book for my book world trip, but what set my mind was the idea, that while Nothing to Envy is a story told through a "middle man", The Girl with Seven Names is an autobiography. Ultimately, now I can say that the dif...
  • Nancy
    4.5 stars. One of the better books I've read on North Korean defection. Kudos to the co-author who brilliantly translated Lee's emotional journey into a page-turner. The third part was my favorite because it involved her family's long and arduous journey to join her in South Korea. I wasn't surprised that both her mother and brother longed to return to the North because adapting to life in Seoul presented a tremendous and negative cultural shock....