Homo Deus by Yuval Noah Harari

Homo Deus

Yuval Noah Harari, author of the critically-acclaimed New York Times bestseller and international phenomenon Sapiens, returns with an equally original, compelling, and provocative book, turning his focus toward humanity’s future, and our quest to upgrade humans into gods.Over the past century humankind has managed to do the impossible and rein in famine, plague, and war. This may seem hard to accept, but, as Harari explains in his trademark sty...


Details Homo Deus

TitleHomo Deus
Author
Release DateFeb 21st, 2017
PublisherHarper
LanguageEnglish
GenreNonfiction, Science, History, Philosophy, Anthropology
Rating

Reviews Homo Deus

  • Emma
    2016-08-29
    This is a profoundly shocking piece of writing, a tactic which Yuval Noah Harari uses to great effect in getting readers to think about society today. The book is ostensibly about the future of mankind, but really is a means of highlighting how current trends in science, technology, humanity etc may progress and asks if that's really how we want things to go. It's philosophy. That big question that has been posed throughout the ages: how should w...
  • Darwin8u
    2017-03-24
    “Every day millions of people decide to grant their smartphone a bit more control over their lives or try a new and more effective antidepressant drug. In pursuit of health, happiness and power, humans will gradually change first one of their features and then another, and another, until they will no longer be human.” ― Yuval Noah Harari, Homo Deus: A Brief History of TomorrowHarari takes us, with this continuation to his blockbuster book S...
  • Riku Sayuj
    2017-10-12
    Homo ObsoletusThe audacious first act, Sapiens, ended with a wild and apocalyptic prophesy - that the Sapiens were cooking up the next epochal revolution that will overshadow the previous three: the cognitive, agricultural and scientific/industrial revolutions. Home Deus, the second act, is the full exploration of that prophesy. Both Sapiens and Homo Deus are compulsory reading in my book, even though the macro-history presented is plenty vulnera...
  • Andrej Karpathy
    2017-07-31
    This book reads like the author read a number of popular science articles, watched some sci-fi movies, attended a transhumanist meetup, got just a bit high on weed and then started writing.
  • David
    2016-08-28
    This is a powerful book by a truly insightful author. I recently read Harari's previous great book, Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, and I enjoyed this one just as much. There is so much packed into Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow, that it is hard to do justice to the book in a review. Yuval Harari has such a unique insight into how the world turns. He is sometimes very blunt, but he "tells it like he sees it." The first two-thirds o...
  • BlackOxford
    2017-12-30
    Tongue Firmly in CheekOrThe Mormons Are RightOrEvolution Is So YesterdayOrThe Problems of Prayers AnsweredOrToo Much Good News Is Hard to TakeOrIt Could have Turned Out So Different; But It Didn’t OrAll Thoughts and Feelings Are Algorithms; Except This OneOrFiction Is Our Fundamental Technology; Just Ask Donald TrumpOr The Vital Uncertainty: We Can Have Meaning Or Power in Life But Not Both TogetherAs with his previous book Sapiens, Harari tell...
  • Helen 2.0
    2017-05-15
    Obviously I need to get a copy of Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind because I loved this book. I can't claim to be well-read in the topic of Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow, so I'm definitely biased in my opinion that Harari is a genius. Every few pages my copy has lengthy passages highlighted, brilliant bits I just knew I would want to reference when I pitched this book to family and friends later on. In Homo Deus, Harari holds that n...
  • Nir
    2016-06-05
    Harari is a fantastic historian: he writes effortlessly and fascinatingly about historic trends, and has a great big picture perspective of the revolutions and contexts of historical progression.Harari, however, is not a good futurologist and an absolutely terrible cognitive scientist. Being educated in Cognitive Science and technology myself, all I can say, with the utmost respect I can offer to a fellow Israeli, is that he's full of shit.Homo D...
  • Atila Iamarino
    2016-07-13
    Que livro amigos, que livro. Não lembro do que li que me fez pensar tanto e mudar a forma como vejo o mundo. Uma ótima análise rápida sobre como chegamos aqui, que se conecta muito bem com o Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, e uma análise mais extensa sobre para onde podemos ir. A análise em terceira pessoa sobre humanismo, capitalismo e tendências futuras é excelente. E a reflexão que ele traz sobre os valores que damos para o valo...
  • Safat
    2016-09-17
    We are not so taken aback when we hear computer programs can beat human chess masters. After all, computers are far more efficient calculators than humans, and chess can be broken down to calculations (In fact, nowadays chess masters don't stand a chance against present day computer Chessmaster programs. It's simply not possible for a human mind to beat them). And we're also not at all shocked when Google and Tesla present us automated cars drive...
  • J.L. Sutton
    2018-06-06
    The title and the premise of Yuval Noah Harari’s Home Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow sounds intriguing; however, not much felt new. I feel like I’ve already heard much of the author’s arguments in other places. So while the various topics discussed are interesting and thought-provoking, Homo Deus is mostly provocative because of the way it is packaged. Advancements in a number of fields, especially in relation to data and an increase in ...
  • Cj Dufficy
    2016-10-07
    Certainly a disappointment when compared to Sapiens. The insights were generally already well presented in the earlier book. The section on animal lives is not convincingly warranted for inclusion but more obviously just a passion for the author leading me to feel I was being preached too. His criticism of Dawkins et al although correct could be equally pointed at himself. The universe will move from hot to cold regardless of quantum mechanical r...
  • Weronika
    2016-12-07
    The book is hugely disappointing. A year or so ago I read an interview with Harari on this book, which was still work in progress, and I found his views on biological inequality (and, to a lesser extent, the decoupling of intelligence from consciousness) very insightful. Actually, it was that interview that inspired me to read Sapiens, which, despite certain flaws, unfortunately amplified in Deus, is a book definitely worth reading. Meanwhile, De...
  • Tudor Vlad
    2017-06-19
    I’ve only read one other book written by Yuval Noah Harari and that was Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, this follows in the steps of that to the point that it seems more like a sequel even if they can be read in whatever order you wish. Just as Sapiens, Homo Deus is a gripping book, I love Yuval’s writing style because it never bores me, he always manages to draw my full attention. Homo Deus is a book that wants to present the possible...
  • Anastasia Alén
    2016-09-09
    Shocking. Entertaining. Incredibly thoughtful. Freaking fantastic!One of the most informative books I have ever read. I think Homo Deus poses some excellent questions that make you question your existence. Why do we think of ourselves as superior to all other life forms. Why do we have such strong faith in imaginary things such as money, gods, human rights, companies...And what will become of us if dataism succeeds. All in all, it's clear that we...
  • Otis Chandler
    2017-03-28
    Sapiens was one of my favorite nonfiction books I've read in the past few years - so I was excited for the sequel. Overall, its very worth it and full of a lot of the interesting high level perspectives and frameworks. But it also lacks the clear structure of a coherent narrative, isn't presenting (to me) quite as novel information, and also does some strange things - like using the word 'liberal' in contexts that I don't think definitionally mak...
  • Carlos
    2017-03-12
    4.5 stars actually, this book give us a comprehensive look into the near and distant future . Homo sapiens (modern humans) were able to gain dominance over all of nature because of their ability to communicate and to collaborate with each other and because they could use their collective brain to come up with novel ideas, but as technology progresses and we rely more and more in computers and algorithms these computers programs are based on , are...
  • Amir The Fat Bookworm
    2017-11-20
    A great and ausual book. When considering many more books about the same topic, "how we are going to be", Harari's arguments are more than satisfying and his reasonings are both terrifying and educated. I believe his warnings were the most accurate, I could have found on the topic of technologies and how they may be a danger to us. So there are so many people, like Hawkins that try to warn us about future AI uprising, which any sci-fi author from...
  • Bharath Ramakrishnan
    2017-10-01
    Having read Sapiens, I had some idea that there would be new themes which Yuval Noah Harari would cover which nobody else has before. With Sapiens, it was about the agricultural revolution and the binding power of stories. And yes - there are brilliant new themes in Homo Deus as well - our delusion of free will and the Sapiens in a future world ruled by algorithms, and it continues excellently from where Sapiens left off. If Sapiens was about how...
  • Ram
    2017-02-10
    Now that the Human kind, in the 20th century, has managed to control famine, plague and war, it is ready for it's next challenge. According to Yuval Noah Harari, the main reason that humans have managed to attain such a strong position in this planet is their ability to believe in "imaginary orders" such as countries, religion, money etc.Many believe that we have something in us that could be called a soul or consciousness or similar but it is no...
  • Brian Yahn
    2017-11-21
    Sapiens was a great book in that it explained, briefly, what you need to know to understand humans today.Homo Deus attempts to do the same thing, but for the future. It let's you know the important technical advances that could have huge implications to society: specifically technologies that could end liberalism, humanism, and capitalism.It's hard to imagine a current world without one of those things. But in the not-to-distant future, all three...
  • André Oliveira
    2018-04-12
    So good and scary at the same time!
  • Alice Lippart
    2018-04-17
    Really interesting.
  • Ray
    2017-08-20
    This book is sure to give one a lot to think about.Firstly, I’d highly recommend reading Harari’s seminal Sapiens book before delving into Homo Deus. They are meant to complement each other in order to better understand humanity’s past and future. Much of Homo Deus repeats the previous themes, which is a bit of a flaw, and frames human historical patterns into broad categories which can seem rushed if one didn’t read Sapiens already. Stil...
  • M.
    2016-12-14
    Genellikle insanlar Hayvanlardan Tanrılara - Sapiens: İnsan Türünün Kısa Bir Tarihi ile kıyaslamış bu kitabı. Fakat ben bu kitabı herhangi bir kitapla kıyaslamadan kendi içinde değerlendirmek istiyorum. Zira bir tür Popüler Bilim, ütopya ve politik eleştiri arasında kalan bambaşka bir kitap. Popüler bilim ile ilgilenenleri bu alanda yazılmış harikulade kitaplar olan; Cosmos, Üçüncü Şempanze, Cennetin Ejderleri gibi ki...
  • Tanja Berg
    2017-03-04
    "Looking back, many think that the downfall of the pharaohs and the death of God were both positive developments. People are usually afraid of change because they fear the unknown. But the single greatest constant of history is that everything changes."Knowing where we are is a prerequisite for having any idea of where we are going. Common fantasies is what put humans on top. Not only can we communicate, but we can also comminuticate about thing ...
  • Elena
    2017-01-04
    Awesome. This book, as the previous one by this author, goes directly to the shelf of my favourites. Some quotes. "Unlike the narrating self that controls us today, Google will not make decisions on the basis of cooked-up stories, and will not be misled by cognitive short cuts and the peak-end rule. Google will actually remember every step we took and every hand we shook.""In exchange for such devoted counselling services, we will just have to gi...
  • Mandy
    2016-10-09
    What a compelling, engaging, thought-provoking, and ultimately quite terrifying book this is. I found it unputdownable - there’s just so much food for thought in its pages and I often find myself thinking back to it when I hear of advances in science and technology with which the author’s vision of the future begins to seem ever more plausible. He describes how human nature, indeed our very humanity, could be transformed in the not very dista...
  • Manuel Antão
    2017-12-20
    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.Reiterated Popperian Non-Fiction: "Homo Deus - A Brief History of Tomorrow" by Yuval Noah HarariWhen I was little, I believed (sort of) that Santa Claus existed. It was a working hypothesis that worked, and I didn't look behind it until it became untenable. Now I effectively assume my continuing identity as a person - because that works, sort of, too. In me, and most people I know, the ...