Circe by Madeline Miller

Circe

"This is as close as you will ever come to entering the world of mythology as a participant. Stunning, touching, and unique."--Margaret George, author of The Confessions of Young NeroIn the house of Helios, god of the sun and mightiest of the Titans, a daughter is born. But Circe is a strange child--not powerful, like her father, nor viciously alluring like her mother. Turning to the world of mortals for companionship, she discovers that she does...


Details Circe

TitleCirce
Author
Release DateApr 10th, 2018
PublisherLee Boudreaux Books
LanguageEnglish
GenreFantasy, Mythology, Historical, Historical Fiction, Retellings, Fiction, Adult, Greek Mythology, Adult Fiction, Literature, Ancient
Rating

Reviews Circe

  • Simona Bartolotta
    1970-01-01
    I dived into Circe believing to be fully prepared for it, all because I had read and re-read, loved and re-loved The Song Achilles. Now I know that was a foolish notion for me to entertain.“It was my first lesson. Beneath the smooth, familiar face of things is another that waits to tear the world in two.”In fact, I soon learned the hard way that no matter how well you think you know her and her writing, you are never prepared for what Madelin...
  • Emma
    1970-01-01
    Thence we sailed on, grieved at heart, glad to have escaped death, though we had lost our dear comrades; and we came to the isle of Aeaea, where dwelt fair-tressed Circe, a dread goddess of human speech, own sister to Aeetes of baneful mind; and both are sprung from Helius, who gives light to mortals, and from Perse, their mother, whom Oceanus begot. Here we put in to shore with our ship in silence, into a harbor where ships may lie, and some god...
  • Emma
    1970-01-01
    'I thought once that gods are the opposite of death, but I see now they are more dead than anything, for they are unchanging, and can hold nothing in their hands.'5 wonderful Madeline Miller stars! After The Song of Achilles, I was intrigued to see what marvels would come next. Set in the aftermath of the Olympian victory over the Titans, Circe is a lesser daughter of Helios, the Titanic Sun God, a nymph and immortal.I am not going to go into det...
  • Roman Clodia
    1970-01-01
    Circe de-clawed and domesticatedOnce again, I'm afraid I'm an outlier when it comes to Miller: while I didn't dislike this in the same way that I did her Achilles, I found this to be a shallow, even superficial, version of Circe, and one which takes a woman who is wild and dangerous in the originary myths and then de-claws and domesticates her. Miller's Circe is kind and gentle, yearning to be loved and included in her cold family, and even the m...
  • Lucy Banks
    1970-01-01
    I received a copy of this book from Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.A much-loved legend, retold in an intricate, convincing, tale.As a child, I loved the story of the Odyssey. Trojan horses, Cyclopes, evil sirens...what wasn't to like? One character always held particular fascination (and mild horror) though, and that was Circe the sorceress...who turned Odysseus' men into pigs. When I spotted this book on Netgalley, I realised that, ...
  • Ashleigh (a frolic through fiction)
    1970-01-01
    Originally posted on A Frolic Through Fiction*Thank you so much to the publisher for sending me an early copy of this book! This in no way affects my opinion.I already know I’m going to reread this book many times in my life. I already want to reread it, and I’ve only just finished it.Now, I’ve not yet read The Odyssey, the book that’s said to have inspired this one. But I certainly don’t think it loses anything by reading it that way...
  • lp
    1970-01-01
    CIRCE is written so beautifully and epically it almost felt metaphysical. I am so sad to not be reading it anymore. I keep having moments where I am thinking about living life fully, motherhood, and feelings that are so human they are biblical and I wonder, "why was I just thinking about that?" It is because I just finished CIRCE. It made me examine what it means to be human. This book whipped me into a world I did not want to leave. I felt like ...
  • charlotte
    1970-01-01
    "How do you bear it?" he said[...]"We bear it as best we can," I said. **SOME VAGUE SPOILERS**Galley provided by publisherCirce is perhaps one of my most anticipated books for the next year and, while I have been wavering on how to rate it, it definitely did not disappoint. I would say I perhaps didn't like it so much as I did The Song of Achilles when I read that, but that's always going to be a hard book to top.The novel tells the story of the ...
  • Emma
    1970-01-01
    First of all, I'd like to thank Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.This book blew me away.There are many ways of judging a book: the cleverness of the plot and concept; the beauty of the prose; the depth of the characters; the emotional effect it has on you personally; the importance and relevance of the themes it addresses, to name but a few. But given that I’ve never encounte...
  • Amber Brown
    1970-01-01
    WE GOT A GALLEY AT WORK TODAY AND IT'S ALL MINE AND I'M SO EXCITED
  • Karina
    1970-01-01
    Madeline Miller has done it again! It is no secret that The Song of Achilles is one of my favourite books of all time, and her next novel did not disappoint. You can definitely see how much her writing has improved in this one and I am really looking forward to any future novels she will choose to write. The storyline was glorious, although I felt some areas were a bit rushed and the ending was not exactly what I was expecting or wanted, however ...
  • Emily Crowe
    1970-01-01
    This book had a slower burn for me than Song of Achilles, which I loved almost immediately. But by the time Circe’s life in exile begins to unfold, I was deeply engrossed. By the time Odysseys appears, I couldn’t turn the pages quickly enough. And by the time Circe picks up her bronze bowl one final time, I was deeply moved, indeed.
  • Hannah
    1970-01-01
    Meant to read a few pages of this to have a little sneak peek, before reading it the next day on the plane. Then I ended up reading three quarters of the book till about two in the morning, before my flight. Oops. Circe is just as gripping as the Song of Achilles, I don't think I could go through this review without comparing the two, which was a book that I read in two sittings. The reason for the two sittings was that I had to stop reading as I...
  • Keith Currie
    1970-01-01
    Pearls and swineHow do you write a convincing novel based on events from Classical Greek mythology? How do you treat gods and magic? Do you play up the comic aspects and ignore any sense of realism? Or do you omit them completely and strive for the real story behind the myth? Both methods have been employed by other authors, the second more generally successful than the first.Madeline Miller has chosen to centre her novel on a goddess, Circe, a g...
  • Eleanor
    1970-01-01
    I can't even begin to fathom how to describe this book, or how to put into comprehensible words how it made me feel. Miller proves to still be one of my favourite authors, and I hope she doesn't make me wait much longer for more of her stories. Circe is a tale of love, family, friendship, and the lack of all three. It demonstrates the power of words and will, the importance of independence and self-worth, and the threads that tie the present day ...
  • Anouk
    1970-01-01
    TRIGGER WARNINGS FOR DISCUSSIONS OF RAPECirce is a celebration of the female heroes, anti-heroes, and ordinary women of Greek mythology. It’s a disconcertingly relevant text in today’s world, because stories about women struggling against patriarchal power structures are (sadly) truly timeless. Much like Miller’s previous book, the Song of Achilles, Circe focusses on a mythical character and weaves all the existing accounts of their life to...
  • Daisy
    1970-01-01
    Quality Rating: Five StarsEnjoyment Rating: Five Stars◆ Thank you so much NetGalley and Bloomsbury for this ebook for review ◆If I could read Miller's classical retellings forever, I'd do it without hesitating. Actually, to call Circe and her other novels retellings greatly under praises them. Miller crafts the entire life of one of the most infamous female immortals of the Greek world; it weaves with The Odyssey but it spreads its wings much...