Wishtree by Katherine Applegate

Wishtree

Trees can't tell jokes, but they can certainly tell stories. . . .Red is an oak tree who is many rings old. Red is the neighborhood "wishtree"—people write their wishes on pieces of cloth and tie them to Red's branches. Along with her crow friend Bongo and other animals who seek refuge in Red's hollows, this "wishtree" watches over the neighborhood.You might say Red has seen it all. Until a new family moves in. Not everyone is welcoming, and Re...


Details Wishtree

TitleWishtree
ISBN9781250043221
Author
Release DateSep 26th, 2017
PublisherFeiwel & Friends
LanguageEnglish
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Fantasy, Fiction, Animals
Rating

Reviews Wishtree

  • Kate Olson
    1970-01-01
    ALL THE STARS!!! This is THE middle grade book of fall 2017 and it should be on the pre-order list for every single library and middle grade classroom in the country. While it may be listed as for ages 10-14, I would read this book aloud as far down as first grade. WISHTREE is at first glance a middle grade novel about a tree and animals, but WISHTREE is also, and more importantly, a message book. It uses the medium of a beautiful middle grade s...
  • Bmquiram
    1970-01-01
    Wishtree by Katherine Applegate is a great story. It reminded me of the old sayings 'If walls could talk' and ' I'd like to be a fly on their ceiling'. I won't write a synopsis because there is already one on the book and there is always plenty of reviews with summaries available. I'll just jump right to what the writing style is like. This story is very well written. There are interesting facts sprinkled within the text but it doesn't read like ...
  • Donalyn
    1970-01-01
    Beautiful story about family and community.
  • Michele Knott
    1970-01-01
    Powerful, powerful book.This book needs to be read by every child, every where.
  • Ivonne Rovira
    1970-01-01
    Katherine Applegate’s The One and Only Ivan is one of the finest books I’ve ever read. Not one of the finest children’s book. Not one of the finest illustrated book — although the drawings are breathtaking. No, one of the finest books, period. I have harangued countless adults to please, please give Ivan a chance!So it pains me to say that Wishtree is no The One and Only Ivan. Yes, as is in Applegate’s 2013 Newbery Medal winner, Wishtre...
  • Mary Ann
    1970-01-01
    Beautiful, unique, touching. But most of all, real . It's just what I needed to read today, this week, this year.
  • Andy Plemmons
    1970-01-01
    Everyone needs hope. Who knew so many current topics could be brought up through the point of view of a tree. Applegate leaves the setting generic which makes it apply to almost any community with a tree and an elementary school 😁. The book is filled with community, love, hope, and the complexities that we face in our diverse world. I hope readers will take time to reflect on our world and how we can all support one another's hopes and dreams.
  • Sarah
    1970-01-01
    Wishtree is the story of Red, an optimistic oak tree who is home to many wild creatures living in harmony in her branches and hollows. Every year, the residents who live nearby come to tie their wishes onto Red's branches in hopes that they will come true. One wish in particular comes from Samar, a young Muslim girl whose family is the target of a hateful act from one of their neighbors. Samar wishes for a friend, and Red, being the optimist she ...
  • Mary Lee
    1970-01-01
    Right story at the right time. Pair with COME WITH ME.
  • Angie
    1970-01-01
    I'll save quotes til publication gets closer (I read an advanced electronic copy from Netgalley). Just 1) I "wish" there wasn't a need for books like this; but 2) there is. And this one is lovely.
  • Dan
    1970-01-01
    My wish is for classrooms across the country to use this story as a read aloud to nourish community this year and beyond.
  • Ms. Yingling
    1970-01-01
    E ARC from Edelweiss Above the TreelineRed is an oak tree who has been around for over 200 years. She has a number of animal families inhabiting her branches, along with her best friend, the crow Bongo. It is tree policy not to talk to humans, but when a boy carves "Leave" into her bark in an effort to scare off Samar's Muslim family from living in the neighborhood. The tree makes an effort to make Samar's wish come true, and employs various anim...
  • Jen Petro-Roy
    1970-01-01
    Wow. This book was utterly beautiful. Sensitive, touching, deep, and so, so important. Recommended for all ages, kids to adults, basically.
  • Brynn
    1970-01-01
    This was a easy read, a really nice read. I really enjoyed reading this book, and actually hope that somehow Kathreine comes out with another book to start up a series. Thanks for te pretty amazing book! <3
  • Suzanne Maley
    1970-01-01
    What a wonderful story! And very timely in a a subtle way. I think it would also make a good read aloud.
  • Niki (Daydream Reader)
    1970-01-01
    This book has my heart!!! A must read! The book we need right now!
  • Rosemary
    1970-01-01
    I received an eARC of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. And honestly? This is a beautiful book for late elementary/middle grades readers. The narrator is a 200-year old Red Oak, whose inclination to devolve into "Wise Old Tree" cliches is undercut by his crow sidekick, Bongo. While "Red" is the narrator, though, the real story is taking place in the human space around her. When an angry teenager carves the word "LEAVE" int...
  • Kathie
    1970-01-01
    Sigh...finally! I felt like I waited to read this book for a very, very, long time, and I'm so glad that I understand what all the buzz is about.I loved Red, the oak tree, as a protagonist. This was unusual and worked very well for me (although the lack of dialog in the first part of the book made me a bit nervous about where it was going). I think this perspective was unique and will open some readers eyes about the affect they have on nature.I ...
  • Trin
    1970-01-01
    Katherine Applegate marries her usual ardent environmentalism with a topical story about immigration and community. Gosh, I just made this sound so dry. It's not. It's a warm, big-hearted book. As usual, Applegate makes her animal -- and in this case, plant -- characters come alive with aplomb; I especially loved Bongo the crow. To me, the message of this book was somewhat unsubtle, but FOR GOSH SAKE TRIN IT'S A BOOK FOR KIDS. And Applegate doesn...
  • Christina Carter
    1970-01-01
    I am a Welcomer and I can now with all certainty attest to the fact that, "Trees can't tell Jokes, but they can certainly tell stories" (Wishtree by Katherine Applegate). Boy do I LOVE Red and its unlikely tennants that surprisingly dwell harmoniously in its hallows; seldom cantankerously. We've much to learn from this bunch. Red is every bit an optimist and filled with hope as evidenced by the sentiment that, "Hollows are proof that something ba...
  • Julie
    1970-01-01
    Red is a majestic red oak tree who has seen many seasons come and go. He is also the neighborhood 'wishtree' where people tie their wishes and aspirations to his branches. But when a Muslim family moves into the neighborhood, someone leaves a message of hate instead. This is a heartwarming story about the power of love and healing when a community comes together. It's sad that this book is so relevant today, but I'm grateful for authors who addre...
  • Michele
    1970-01-01
    I received an advance copy of this book from the publisher.it starts out slow. I wanted it to just get to the story already for many pages. once it did though, I was completely hooked on red, all the animals living in red and the families sharing space with the tree. very powerful and very relevant story of immigration, discrimination, community, and friendship. highly recommended for 4th to 8th grades but also for reading aloud to younger audien...
  • Laura Mossa
    1970-01-01
    The narrator of this inspiring story is Red, a wise, optimistic oak who is affectionately known in the neighborhood as the "wishtree." Each year on the first of May, people write down their hopes and tie it to one of Red's branches. In two hundred and sixteen years, Red though has learned sometimes "there's not much you can do except stand tall and reach deep." But after Samar and her family move in and some neighbors are not welcoming, Samar sha...
  • Mr. Steve
    1970-01-01
    So good! My favorite book of the year (so far). It was sweet and sad and hopeful. Short chapters and low 200s page count make it a fantastic read aloud, even for as young as early elementary students (who might not get everything, but definitely enough to make a difference).Should definitely be on the Newbery shortlist and even have a chance at winning. I'll be cheering to hear the title called at Midwinter!
  • Caitlin Zonder
    1970-01-01
    This was a beautiful book. The best book I have read in a long time. Red is an unusual, but wonderful narrator. There were so many wonderfully written lines in the story. I loved the way the different animals chose their names. A lot of then had me laughing out loud. There was so much heart in this story. This book is needed right now.
  • Ashlee Null
    1970-01-01
    She knows how to tug at your heart strings and she isn't one to shy away from a tough subject. More than the narrator being a red oak tree, to adults it may seem a tad too optimistic for the circumstances but honestly sometimes adults and children just need a reminder that hope is real and needed. This book is hope.
  • Tj Shay
    1970-01-01
    It's not every book that has a tree as a narrator....it's not every book that has a gorilla as a narrator either....that's the magic of Katherine's storytelling....you believe. This book is Katherine Applegate at her very best. You fall in love with all of the characters and your are longing to go hang some wishes on the tree.....like the wish the book would never end.
  • Melinda
    1970-01-01
    This was me, reading this entire book on my lunch break today:12:15: This is too slow. This talking tree is no Ivan.12:30: This is didactic and heavy-handed.12:45: Ok, sniff.1:00: WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH.
  • Katherine
    1970-01-01
    Wishtree is from the POV of a sentient tree, and tells a story of community, bigotry, and acceptance. The human characters are rather featureless. We don't get much of a description and the information we have about them is mostly inferred. I thought it worked well with the context here, considering the speaker is a tree. Overall a beautiful tale that I really enjoyed reading.
  • Jennifer
    1970-01-01
    Beautiful story.