Forest Dark by Nicole Krauss

Forest Dark

Jules Epstein, a man whose drive, avidity, and outsized personality have, for sixty-eight years, been a force to be reckoned with, is undergoing a metamorphosis. In the wake of his parents’ deaths, his divorce from his wife of more than thirty years, and his retirement from the New York legal firm where he was a partner, he’s felt an irresistible need to give away his possessions, alarming his children and perplexing the executor of his estat...


Details Forest Dark

TitleForest Dark
ISBN9780062431011
Author
Release DateSep 12th, 2017
PublisherHarper
LanguageEnglish
GenreFiction, Contemporary, Literary Fiction, Cultural, Israel, Literature, Novels, Jewish, Adult Fiction, Travel, Womens
Rating

Reviews Forest Dark

  • Elyse
    1970-01-01
    "But at a certain point the helplessness of our shared love for the children had reached a kind of apex, and then began to decline until it was no longer helpful to our relationship at all, because it only shone a light on how alone each of us was, and, compared to our children, how unloved"."In our own ways, we had each come to understand that we had lost faith in our marriage. And yet we didn't know how to act on this understanding, as one does...
  • Jill
    1970-01-01
    If I were a professional book reviewer—which I’m not—I might well have given Forest Dark five stars. After all, it’s cerebral, intelligently written, thought provoking, and brilliantly complex.But I am simply a reader who likes to capture my reading experience and share my thoughts with others. And for me, this book was a thing to be admired rather than loved.There are two parallel stories. One is the story of Jules Epstein, who goes miss...
  • Rebecca Foster
    1970-01-01
    Impressive in scope and structure, yet rather frustrating. If you’re hoping for another History of Love, you’re likely to come away disappointed: while that book touched the heart; this one is mostly cerebral. Metafiction, the Kabbalah, and some alternative history featuring Kafka are a few of the major elements, so think about whether those topics attract or repel you. Looking deeper, this is a book about Jewish self-invention and reinventio...
  • Rachel León
    1970-01-01
    Nicole Krauss is hands down one of my favorite novelists. I'm in awe of her brilliance. Yes, she is a poetic writer who can writes well-crafted beautiful sentences, but her intelligence seems other worldly. She can craft such a rich story that appears simple on the surface, but is deceptively layered with meaning--such is the case with FOREST DARK. The story juxtaposes the lives of Epstein, a retired attorney, and Nicole, a novelist. The presence...
  • Lucy Banks
    1970-01-01
    I received a copy of this book from Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.Beautiful prose and a fascinating subject matter - but I was left wondering what the central point was...Right from the start, I was wowed by the author's stunningly elegant writing; such thought-provoking language, laid out beautifully in this novel which is half about people, half about the nature of Judaism (and indeed, theology in general). It's a story about Epst...
  • Ron Charles
    1970-01-01
    Some readers may wonder if there’s a connection between the narrator of "Forest Dark" and the critically acclaimed novelist Nicole Krauss, who also has two sons and is separated from her husband, Jonathan Safran Foer. Nothing in these pages discourages the assumption that Krauss is revealing her own laments about the failure of their marriage, which makes “Forest Dark” feel uncomfortably passive aggressive: an act of relationship revenge wi...
  • switterbug (Betsey)
    1970-01-01
    Nicole Krauss has always delivered 5 star books, but FOREST DARK is easily her best and most mesmerizing one to date. Poised, elegant, and numinous, it also moved me close to tears and left me exhilarated. She explores that liminal space between darkness and light, the internal and external, emptiness and fullness, and between life and death. Two unrelated but connected characters and their stories are linked thematically in their quests for spir...
  • Sam
    1970-01-01
    Review TK.
  • Kathleen
    1970-01-01
    My review for the Chicago Tribune: http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifesty...Nicole Krauss' highly anticipated fourth novel, "Forest Dark," is preceded with a variation on the standard this-is-a-work-of-fiction disclaimer: "References to real people, events, establishments and organizations or locales are intended only to provide a sense of authenticity and are used fictitiously. All other characters, and all incidents and dialogue, are drawn from ...
  • Sid Nuncius
    1970-01-01
    I thought Nicole Krauss's Great House was excellent and I was looking forward to this very much. Sadly, I thought Forest Dark was self-regardingly flashy and ultimately empty.The book centres around two Jewish characters who are, in their different ways, having crises of identity and reassessing both their lives and their relationships with Israel and Judaism. Jules Epstein is a hugely successful businessman who begins to give away his possession...
  • Kirsty
    1970-01-01
    Krauss is one of my favourite authors, and her newest novel, Forest Dark, was one of my most highly anticipated reads of the year. Her prose is wonderful, and the entire book has been beautifully, richly, and sensuously written. The characters are all multi-layered, and teem with complexities. Krauss' newest work is filled with a plethora of philosophical and scientific ideas, of psychology and the practices and processes of weiring. The use of t...
  • Leah Rachel
    1970-01-01
    I adored The History of Love when I read it in 2010, its poetic language and twisting tale washing over me like ocean waves. So I was thrilled when I heard that Nicole Krauss was releasing a new novel this September called Forest Dark, and even more thrilled when it arrived in my mailbox a few weeks ago in exchange for an honest review. Forest Dark is an incredible piece of artwork that tells two tales of personal transformation. A lawyer, Jules ...
  • Fiona
    1970-01-01
    I've given up 30% through this book. It's not that I didn't find some enjoyment in reading it, it's that it became harder and harder to pick it up. I'm not a fan of the two thread novel format generally and, for me, this is a clear example of why.Essentially we have two unrelated people, a female author who feels trapped in both her domestic and professional lives - she's held as an icon by the Jewish people who feel she champions them in her wri...
  • Jessica
    1970-01-01
    Whee, thanks Edelweiss!
  • Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance
    1970-01-01
    Forest Dark is two stories with two narrators; the paths of the narrators never cross. (I kept waiting. You kind of expect that, don't you?) Both narrators are at crossroads in their lives. The story of the rich old man was very compelling, as we follow him during his later years, abruptly, inexplicably, divorcing after a long marriage, giving away all his possessions, and moving to Israel. The second story is that of a well-respected writer who ...
  • Patty Shlonsky
    1970-01-01
    "...in Israel no one can ever agree on the way the world appears, and despite the violence of the never-ending argument, the basic admittance of discord had always been a relief to me."Forest Dark is about two very different people, completely unconnected, searching for some sense of something in Israel. Jules Epstein, a wealthy, loud, opinionated and boorish retired lawyer, is recently divorced. He is struggling with who he is, the personalities...
  • Greg Zimmerman
    1970-01-01
    Fiercely smart, incredibly personal, gorgeously written. So much to keep in your head, so much to puzzle out. I'm not sure I did either very well.
  • Sue
    1970-01-01
    With thanks to Bloomsbury via NetGalley for the opportunity to read this. I am not averse to a bit of theology in my reading and Nicole Krauss has some interesting things to say about the Jewish faith and the Jews’ creation of their own myth and history. ‘…we didn’t invent the idea of a single God; we only wrote a story of our struggle to remain true to Him and in doing so we invented ourselves. We gave ourselves a past and inscribed ours...
  • Mary Lins
    1970-01-01
    “Forest Dark”, by Nicole Krauss, is a very unusual novel in structure, plot and tone. It’s my first time reading Krauss, so I can’t compare it with her highly acclaimed previous novels, but I did enjoy its uniqueness.The novel is structured with two alternating narratives. In the first, we have Epstein, a 68-year old Jewish man; father of three adults and recently divorced. Epstein is a complex character “resistant to easy categorizatio...
  • Matt
    1970-01-01
    I 95% chalk this rating to user error, but I honestly have no idea what was going on in Forest Dark. That's not to say that I couldn't follow the plot. I could. Mostly. The story, though? I am at a complete loss on the significance--the meaning--of the whole thing. I have a strong sense that someone more versed in/familiar with Israel and Judaism's scripture/stories would be able to decode what Nicole Krauss is going for. To me, however, the plot...
  • Moray Teale
    1970-01-01
    This is my second novel by Nicole Krauss, following on from the wonderful History of Love. Many of the themes of Forest Dark will be familiar to anyone who has read this earlier work, the place of faith, identity, the role of art and the artist who creates it, the real ownership of the things we create. In a similar fashion to the History of Love she constructs her narrative through two distinct but related strands. The first is Jules Epstein a s...
  • Kasa Cotugno
    1970-01-01
    Nicole Krauss is undoubtedly a cerebral author. Her books demand a lot of a reader, not always providing quick and easy answers, challenging him to dig deep for meaning and content. In this case, two threads seemingly running parallel threaten to converge. Jules Epstein's story is told in third person, and for me, was the more engaging of the two. Nicole, protagonist of the second, tells her own story in first person, and as it contains elements ...
  • Charlotte Burns
    1970-01-01
    Forest Dark is the stories of two people who go to Israel, attempting to transform their lives in some way, shedding their past. It is also about Kafka and Israel. These different stories of metamophosis (presumably a theme tied back to Kafka) run alternately through the narrative. At times, it is very beautifully written. Nicole writes wonderful descriptions of place and some ofher anecdotes in her characters lives are very evocative: the story ...
  • Mandy
    1970-01-01
    The only reason it took me so long to finish this book, is because I wanted to read almost every single sentence over and over again..... same for the paragraphs.... and the chapters.... and to be honest the book itself as well
  • Lori
    1970-01-01
    I was a goodreads giveaway winner of "Forest Dark" I wish I could have liked this book better. I had a hard time getting into the plots. It is seen through the eyes of two characters with separate plot lines. Epstein is a 68 year old man who has just divorced his wife of over 30 years and grieving the recent deaths of his parents. He gives away some of his prized items and leaves for Israel.{Tel-aviv} a woman without a name who has writers' block...
  • Mandy
    1970-01-01
    Now what, exactly, is this book all about? What is the point of it? At times it reads like an extended essay. At others it consists of rambling digressions. What it doesn’t read like is a compelling and engaging novel about characters who draw the reader in and make us want to learn about them. There are two narrative threads, surely a rather outworn device by now, which are only very loosely interconnected. Told in alternate chapters, we have ...
  • Rosemary
    1970-01-01
    Disappointing after loving The History of Love, although it's a very thoughtful book with some wonderful insights. I liked the touch of magical realism, and I enjoyed the descriptions of Israel, which made it sound a surprising country in all sorts of ways. But the novel seemed monotonous in the true sense of the word - all on one note, with no variations. It lacked emotion. The two characters on their different trajectories don't seem to connect...