Bored and Brilliant by Manoush Zomorodi

Bored and Brilliant

Has your smartphone become your BFF? Do you feel bored when you're not checking Facebook or Instagram? Bored and Brilliant: How Spacing Out Can Unlock Your Most Productive and Creative Self explains the connection between boredom and original thinking, and explores how we can harness boredom's hidden benefits to become our most productive selves.In 2015, WNYC Studio's 'Note To Self' host Manoush Zomorodi led thousands of her listeners through a w...


Details Bored and Brilliant

TitleBored and Brilliant
ISBN9781250124951
Author
Release DateSep 5th, 2017
PublisherSt. Martin's Press
LanguageEnglish
GenreNonfiction, Self Help, Psychology, Science
Rating

Reviews Bored and Brilliant

  • Jane
    1970-01-01
    I am very interested in the topic of phone use and overuse. I am not anti-technology (and neither is the author of this book), but I do find the overuse of phones by much of American society alarming. Zomorodi was definitely preaching to the choir with me as a reader.Zomorodi includes research to back up the idea that we are more creative when we allow ourselves to be “bored” and allow our minds to wander. I do not carry my smartphone around ...
  • Jess Macallan
    1970-01-01
    I received an e-copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.I was interested in the premise of this book--the idea that by unplugging and purposefully allowing ourselves to be bored, we could benefit creatively and in other ways. I enjoyed the information--both studies and interviews with experts--that outlined our need for and addiction to technology, specifically our smartphones. I did the challenges outlined in the book, w...
  • SundayAtDusk
    1970-01-01
    This book is an interesting and concise look at how technology, particularly cell phone usage, is greatly reducing the amount of time one’s wandering mind is daydreaming, coming up with highly creative ideas and “autobiographical planning”. If you’re doing stuff on your cell phone all the time, your mind can’t wander. Not good. Don’t imagine this is an anti-tech book, however. It most certainly is not. Manoush Zomorodi is obviously a ...
  • Terry ~ Huntress of Erudition
    1970-01-01
    When very bored, your brain apparently goes into a "default mode" - that is when creativity and productivity is at it's best. The premise of this statement is that if you are not otherwise distracted, you can think more clearly (obviously) however, according to the study by Manoush Zomorodi, people nowadays are NEVER not distracted, primarily by their cell phones and other devices.In fact, she states that the only businesses that refer to their c...
  • Lynn
    1970-01-01
    I did not like this book. The premise is that we can be more creative if we stop turning to social media when we are bored. The book was simplistic, poorly researched, and included no reference section, Even worse, the author, a "podcaster", reported her online project as if it was an experiment which it clearly is not. I also found the title to be a misnomer. The title implies that if you are bored you can be creative and brilliant. In fact, wha...
  • Janelle
    1970-01-01
    “...mobile consumers now spend an average of two hours and fifty-seven minutes each day on mobile devices.”Waiting in line to check out? Fire up Candy Crush. On your commute? Get caught up on blogs or YouTube vids. One laaaast round of checks on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter before the theater darkens for the movie previews. (And then another check when the lights come up to catch what you missed.)We have the option to never, ever be bored...
  • Michael
    1970-01-01
    An excellent take on the current epidemic of digital addiction. I listened to this book and it was delightful. Ms. Zomorodi is known for her podcast Note to Self, and is easily one of the best nonfiction narrators I've ever heard. She has a talent for emphasis and inflection, and for boiling down large ideas into clear concepts.Also the audiobook includes a very interesting interview with one of the creators of the game Two Dots, which is convers...
  • James Sheasley
    1970-01-01
    Toward the end of her book, Manoush writes, "I'm a sucker for an expert opinion," and I share that trait, which is why as soon as I found out this brilliant person was writing a book, I had to have it. I didn't quite devour it, as one does with many books, in part because I wanted to do the challenges individually and give each chapter the requisite mental space to be fully digested. I'm glad that I did. While I've been listening to her podcast "...
  • Heather
    1970-01-01
    Despite feeling like I’ve heard about many of the broad conclusions Manoush Zomorodi espouses about digital addiction in “Bored and Brilliant,” reading about how and why our brains become addicted to checking Facebook, reaching automatically to check a buzzing notification and compulsively playing a game well past a reasonable bedtime was fun and interesting. This book is every Slate think piece from the last five years about the problems a...
  • Kate
    1970-01-01
    I'd give this 3.5 stars if I could.I listen to the "Note to Self" podcast regularly, so I was excited to read this. I even participated in the "Bored and Brilliant" challenge on her show. One of the things I really enjoyed about this book is it is 100% her voice. I could practically hear her reading the book to me, but that's also because a lot of this came directly from her show. If you are a regular listener, there really isn't a ton of new inf...
  • Carin
    1970-01-01
    This book grew out of the podcast, "Notes to Self" from WNYC. T here are essentially two premises: we no longer allow ourselves to be bored which means we are losing our creativity, and a corollary of that, we need to be much more aware of how much we're using our electronic devices. Personally, I found the corollary more interesting than the main point.Now, that might be because I don't work in a creative job myself (although it is very much cre...
  • Nancy
    1970-01-01
    Enhance Your Creativity: Detach from Your Smart PhoneSmart phones are useful, but they can become a crutch that keeps us from getting in touch with our creative side and distances us from other people. Zomorodi, host of WNYC Studio’s ‘Not to Self,’ realized that being constantly plugged in to her smart phone was keeping her from doing other things, like thinking. She wondered if other people had the same problem. She got her answer when she...
  • Kristine
    1970-01-01
    Bored and Brilliant by Manoush Zomorodi is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in early September.Taking from a segment of her radio show, Note to Self, Zomorodi dissects her challenge to unplug and be less reliant on handheld technology, as well as includes the responses from listeners who took and were (mostly, begrudgingly, or easily) able to complete this challenge. It really doesn't take much to acknowledge the feelings of bogged-down-ness, b...
  • Laura Reading
    1970-01-01
    Educational and interesting. A scholarly look at how changing technology affects the human brain and how humans deal with choosing to prioritize (or not) use of time.I was expecting a discussion on letting ones mind wander to stimulate deeper creative thinking.That topic was covered along with much more. A good portion of the book investigates human behavior, addictive or obsessive, and habits dealing with cell phones and similar electronic devic...
  • Lindsey
    1970-01-01
    Thoughtful, well written and researched. If you've ever thought "hey, I'm addicted to social media or my phone or a game..." and then picked up your phone (or sat at your computer) and looked at or played said thing anyway ... this book is for you. I have a love/hate relationship with any kind of productivity, self-help or business themed book. I can't stop myself from reading them, but I tend to strongly dislike most of them.. Bored and Brillian...
  • Jane
    1970-01-01
    Wonder if your smart phone is getting in the way of life? The author, an NPR reporter, used her show to guide 20,000 listeners through 7 challenges designed to help them make wiser choices regarding their use of technology. The book provides the science behind our difficulties with technology, experiences of people during the challenges, and great commentary on how people are affected. She is clear that the point isn't to do away with technology ...
  • Maria
    1970-01-01
    Zomorodi argues that our constant need for simulation and screen time has eaten into our society's creative time. And that being bored isn't something to fear, it is something to embrace as it gives our brains time to explore new solutions and resort the pieces into new shapes. Why I started this book: Saw the title in a library newsletter (maybe Audible's new and exciting) and thought, that looks fascinating.Why I finished it: It's a short audio...
  • Patricia Romero
    1970-01-01
    Thinking you may be spending way too much time on your Smartphone? I think it's safe to say most of us are!In 2015, the author led 20,000 listeners of her show on NPR, through 7 challenges which she shares with us in this book. They aren't difficult but they are very eye-opening.The book doesn't bash technology, but emphasizes the human aspect of everyday life and the need for mind wandering, daydreaming if you will and the creative and producti...
  • Julie
    1970-01-01
    I really bought this book for my husband, whose incessant screen time has become a source of tension between us. And I bought it because, having grown up with a mother who taught me how to make the most of boredom, I knew I would agree with this writer's main thesis: We need time to do nothing if we want to do anything. The devices are here to stay, but we can be much more deliberate about how and how much we use them. This is a quick, interestin...
  • Alison
    1970-01-01
    I am a rabid listener of Note to Self.This book was a great expansion of the Bored and Brilliant series of episodes on Note to Self.I like that Manoush very much writes the way she speaks. It's comforting to recognize the voice that comes to me weekly. Even though I had listened to the series when it aired, it was interesting to delve more deeply into each task and find out why it had been assigned.
  • Don Gorman
    1970-01-01
    (1 1/2). This is a really interesting concept, one that I am assured has occurred to many of us, that computers, tablets, phones, technology and screens so occupy us that we are not able to perform intellectually and emotionally at levels we are capable of. The research seems reasonable, but we all know you can spin this information all kinds of ways. I like the thought but I thought the presentation was a little dull and lacking.
  • Marije
    1970-01-01
    I definetely liked the book and the science that goes with it. It made me aware of my own digital habits and helped me change them in a way that suits me better.On the other hand, English is not my native language and this book is filled with very long sentences and rather difficult words. That made it hard to get through. I would advise someone in, for example, the Netherlands to read this in Dutch.
  • Mark
    1970-01-01
    A subject relevant to everyone who uses technology. What is your relationship to technology and how is it changing the way you perceive yourself and relate to the world? The author is not anti-tech, Bored and Brilliant offers a way to become more aware,change/improve our use of technology and quality of our lives.
  • Terry McIntire
    1970-01-01
    The book is about the value of escaping from our electronics. Points out we are more creative and our brains function differently without all the screen time. Includes procedures to wean yourself away from some of the devices or apps. "If you spend 25 minutes per day on FB, this will be 2 years of your life". Wonder if on our deathbeds we will wish these 2 years were spent differently?
  • Jennie Mayfield
    1970-01-01
    A solid read. If you've listened to the Bored and Brilliant series this might feel kind of repetitive, but it was nice that they included comments from those that completed the challenge. I like the ideas and I'm definitely going to be more conscious of my social media and screen usage.
  • Tricia Friedman
    1970-01-01
    Thoroughly engaging--a perfect blend of anecdote, wit and research. Fans of the podcast will not be disappointed--the book reads with the same personable and accessible wisdom. I'm recommending this immediately to friends and family.
  • Ampersand Inc.
    1970-01-01
    The importance of being bored (which seems terrifying to most) is unearthed in this book; Zomorodi also teaches us how to be bored, which in the age of all access internet, apps and social media, can seem impossible. I learned tons of tips and will go back to this book many times.
  • Sarah Booth
    1970-01-01
    A book about turning off your phone and letting your mind wander based on an experiment/challenge that started on a WNYC podcast. Useful info about distraction and how we need to realize where we spend our time and not cheat ourselves out of creative day dreaming.
  • Meli
    1970-01-01
    This made me think a lot about my "scrolling" habits. I will try to use my phone and the internet more intentionally. Lots of interesting things to think about.
  • Jaymie Shook
    1970-01-01
    Excellent. Bringing it to my book club so we can all do the challenges together.