The Ninth Hour by Alice McDermott

The Ninth Hour

A magnificent new novel from one of America’s finest writers—a powerfully affecting story spanning the twentieth century of a widow and her daughter and the nuns who serve their Irish-American community in Brooklyn.On a dim winter afternoon, a young Irish immigrant opens the gas taps in his Brooklyn tenement. He is determined to prove—to the subway bosses who have recently fired him, to his badgering, pregnant wife—“that the hours of hi...


Details The Ninth Hour

TitleThe Ninth Hour
ISBN9780374280147
Author
Release DateSep 19th, 2017
PublisherFarrar, Straus and Giroux
LanguageEnglish
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Literary Fiction, Religion, Audiobook
Rating

Reviews The Ninth Hour

  • Angela M
    1970-01-01
    Alice McDermott is one of my very favorite writers. I found in her new novel the same subtle, quiet storytelling with simple prose, descriptions that defy you to stay in your present place and send you to this place, this Catholic, Irish-American Brooklyn in the early twentieth century. She invites you through her ordinary characters living their everyday lives in spite of their flaws, to see the extraordinary things of our humanity. This is a st...
  • Diane S ☔
    1970-01-01
    I absolutely adore this author, and have been waiting for a few years for this her next offering. Her novels aren't suspense filled, no thrill a minute, no car chases or knife wielding psychopaths, just slices of life in all it's messy permutations. Early twentieth century, Brooklyn, a neighborhood of Irish Catholics during a time period when most medical care was performed by nuns, in this case the Little Nursing Sisters of the sick poor, the on...
  • Jill
    1970-01-01
    During this cynical point of time when the words “sacrifice” and “service” have become quaint and puzzling, The Ninth Hour seems a bit of an anachronism or at the very least, historical curiosity.Alice McDermott, however, in exquisite prose, captures the world of early twentieth century Catholic Brooklyn, with its lens on the Little Sisters of the Sick Poor, their laundress Annie and her daughter Sally.The beauty of the novel is that it d...
  • Myra
    1970-01-01
    This is it – my favorite book from 2017. Growing up Catholic, I had an immediate connection to the story. McDermott clearly excels at creating the quiet stories of humanity. THE NINTH HOUR is a sublime piece of literary fiction by this award-winning author. Highly Recommended!PUBLICATION DATE: September 19, 2017
  • Mary Lins
    1970-01-01
    Here’s the gist of my review of “The Ninth Hour”, by Alice McDermott: I loved it and I didn’t want it to end. Keep reading and I’ll tell you why.Beginning with a suicide on a dismal winter’s day in Catholic/immigrant Brooklyn near the beginning of the 20th century, McDermott completely and vividly captures the time, place and denizens of this moment in the history of New York, the US, and of the Catholic Church.The novel is narrated b...
  • Mary Lou
    1970-01-01
    Alice McDermott captures accurately and beautifully the memory of a time of certainty in Irish Catholic communities, when the rules were promulgated by priests and nuns, and deviation from the prescribed path in this life resulted in eternal damnation. I cannot comment on how anyone who has not been brought up in such circumstances can relate to The Ninth Hour, because I was, and therefore can. The Ninth Hour starts quietly as the overworked nuns...
  • BookBully
    1970-01-01
    (Big Sigh.) Hmmm. What to say about THE NINTH HOUR, the new novel from Alice McDermott? As always, I am awestruck by her command of language. Honestly, McDermott is one of the most talented stylists I've ever come across. And her ability to set her reader into a specific place and time is unmatched. In THE NINTH HOUR, McDermott takes us to Brooklyn in the early part of the last century. We meet Annie, a young pregnant woman newly widowed by her h...
  • Jill
    1970-01-01
    On one level, The Ninth Hour is a story about a young widow, Annie, and her daughter. We meet Annie at the lowest point of her life which also happens to be when she meets Sister St. Savior, a spirited nun who will take Annie and her infant daughter under her wing. Annie works in the laundry at the nunnery and Sally grows up knowing the sisters as her family. On a broader level, this is a story full of strong women fighting to live the lives they...
  • Jaclyn Crupi
    1970-01-01
    I love a good NYC stoop cover. McDermott explores the reverberations of depression and suicide through generations/years in her latest novel and in that way it has echoes of Imagine Me Gone but without the humour. The writing is luminous as it always is from McDermott. But this book was too nun heavy for me and I ultimately didn't care enough about the fate of the characters.
  • Debbie Krenzer
    1970-01-01
    For me this book was just okay. I would have, however, liked to have seen more of Sally and a lot less of the nuns. I think that had I'd known that most of it was taking place in a convent, I would not have requested this book.Thanks to Farrar, Straus and Giroux and Net Galley for providing me with a free e-galley in exchange for an honest, unbiased review.
  • Yukari Watanabe
    1970-01-01
    It's an exquisite novel which portrays Catholic Brooklyn in the early twentieth century. I loved the nuns McDermott introduced us. They make you care about them and ultimately our lives.
  • Jean Brown
    1970-01-01
    5 Stars...
  • Bonnie Brody
    1970-01-01
    Alice McDermott has long been a favorite of mine. She has a unique ability to evoke a sense of place and time, usually Catholic families in New York in the first half of the 20th century. Oftentimes, what is not said is as rich and laden with information as that which is clearly spelled out.This novel begins with Jim's suicide. He has been let go from his job and leaves his pregnant wife Annie behind. Serendipitously, shortly after his death, Sis...
  • Sue
    1970-01-01
    Review copy courtesy of Bloomsbury via NetGalley - many thanks for the opportunity. The characters make this book stand out. The nuns of the Little Nursing Sisters of the Sick Poor, Congregation of Mary Before the Cross who ‘appeared in every household whenever crisis or illness disrupted the routine, whenever a substitute was needed for She Who Could Not Be Replaced’. Women of all sorts who became nuns and gave up (but didn’t, of course, e...
  • Dan Radovich
    1970-01-01
    FIVE STARS... 'nuf said. Alice McDermott has created a masterpiece of Irish-American Catholic fiction with THE NINTH HOUR. Yes, I did think of 'Call the Midwife' (for those familiar with the British television show and books) as I began reading. The nuns of the Little Sisters of the Sick Poor, care for the neighborhood of Brooklyn where this glorious piece is set. 1940's/1950's life is captured with brilliant prose, told in a unique 'voice'. Her ...
  • Rosemary
    1970-01-01
    The "Ninth Hour" is not, as I thought, 9 a.m, but 3 p.m., the time for afternoon prayer in the Liturgy of the Hours observed by the Little Nursing Sisters of the Sick. The lives of Annie "Mc-something," Sally, her daughter, and their Brooklyn neighbors intertwine with those of the Sisters who spend their days visiting and caring for those who need them. Their work often necessitates missing organized prayer in the convent chapel. Sally's unnamed ...
  • Jossie Solheim
    1970-01-01
    I wanted to love this book, but I just couldn't get into it. It rambled on quite a bit, without the story seeming to really get anywhere and felt repetitive at times. It really wasn't for me. I did however like the small glimmers of story that occasionally found its way through, but sadly it was overshadowed by the writing style, which didn't flow and made reading it hard work. The layout of the story and the way it jumped around only further con...
  • Kirsty
    1970-01-01
    This wasn't at all a bad novel, but I simply wasn't overly impressed with it. I had heard great things about McDermott's writing before I began to read, and it did not live up to my expectations; it felt a little pretentious at times, and I was not enamoured with her prose style.
  • Liz
    1970-01-01
    http://cavebookreviews.blogspot.comThe early part of the twentieth century is replete with immigrant stories about New York, especially Brooklyn. Alice McDermott is a master of Irish legends, creating a story here that kept my nerves on edge, hoping some good will come to some of her Irish American characters. The Ninth Hour begins with a scene in a tenement building where Jim, recently fired from his job on the BMT railroad, kills himself, leavi...
  • Julia Wilson
    1970-01-01
    Beautifully written story of a young woman coming of age with her single mother and the community of nuns that surround them. Anything by Alice McDermott is worth reading although the theme of this book wasn't my favorite.
  • Lillian
    1970-01-01
    Alice MacDermott is always championing women but never more so than in this quietly beautiful novel.
  • Siobhan
    1970-01-01
    The Ninth Hour is a short, warm novel about the life of a Brooklyn widow and her daughter and their help from the Little Nursing Sisters of the Sick Poor. Annie’s husband Jim commits suicide in their small apartment and Annie, newly pregnant, finds herself at the mercy of Sister St. Saviour. She gets a job in the convent laundry and her daughter, Sally, grows up amongst the sisters, planning to become one of them once she grows up. The narrativ...
  • Marlene
    1970-01-01
    No one gives life to the Irish-American Catholic experience like McDermott. She's done it again in The Ninth Hour. The quiet story explores faith, organized religion, familial love and most of all, the ultimate sadness of the human condition. The brooding sadness is gloriously brightened by wonderful insights into the lives of the characters. The most generous, loving and brave hearts belong to the nuns of the Little Nursing Sisters of the Sick P...
  • Sarah Kennedy
    1970-01-01
    This novel about Irish immigrants in Brooklyn is a lovely character study--with a mystery at its heart. The writing is subtle and evokes the early twentieth century in its details and dialogue. The nuns who inevitably people the world of this book are believable--and human in their faults. No perfectly devout and pious nuns for McDermott! Her women are complex and though they believe in their various callings they also devote themselves to their ...
  • Lynn
    1970-01-01
    Catholic readers will identify totally with the nuns, parents who want their daughters to be nuns, and the daughters who question a vocation. For those unfamiliar, this novel provides a well-crafted look inside the Catholic families of the mid-20th century.I read this EARC courtesy of Faraar Strauss and Edelweiss. pub date 09/19/17
  • Susan
    1970-01-01
    I received a free copy of this book at an event for librarians. At the event, I heard the author speak on a panel, and I later got to speak to her one-on-one at a book signing. She was so incredibly gracious and down-to-earth. The fact that this National Book Award winner and Pulitzer Prize nominated author was willing to shoot the breeze with me about a college class my daughter is taking on Catholicism and how this book might fit into her cours...
  • Sharon May
    1970-01-01
    Many thanks to NetGalley, the publishers, and Alice McDermott for the opportunity to read and review this wonderful book.This story puts you at the beginning of the 20th century in Catholic Brooklyn. It opens with a death and the pregnant wife, Annie, left behind. The nuns of the Little Nursing Sisters of the Sick Poor step in to help Annie, with a job in the laundry room of the convent. There, she and the sisters raise Sally.The writing in this ...
  • Paula Kaufman
    1970-01-01
    I very much admire Alice McDermott's ability to paint character portraits with the detail she offers but without any tedium. In The Ninth Hour she presents us with an interesting story dominated by its well-drawn characters and written in prose that sings from its pages while drawing this reader into the intimacy of so many situations; the laundry, sickrooms, a pivotal train journey, a funeral, all come to life in ways rare in contemporary litera...
  • Claudia Tessier
    1970-01-01
    This was my introduction to McDermott, and a wonderful one it was. I started and finished the book in a single day because it captured my interest immediately and that interest never flagged. I suspect part of the attraction came from my having been raised Catholic and so much of the book brought back memories of the church and of the nuns in my life (including my older sister). Each character - Annie, Sally, Sister Jeanne, Sister Illuminata, and...
  • Sharlene
    1970-01-01
    After losing his subway job, Jim decides to end it all committing suicide by gas from his apartment stove. He leaves behind a pregnant wife but luckily elderly Sister St. Saviour of the Little Nursing Sister of the Sick Poor is passing by and thus begins out story. She takes pregnant Annie in hand, helps clean up the apartment. When baby Sally arrives the nuns give Annie a job in the convent's nursery where she can keep her baby with her as she w...