Future Home of the Living God by Louise Erdrich

Future Home of the Living God

The world as we know it is ending. Evolution has reversed itself, affecting every living creature on earth. Science cannot stop the world from running backwards, as woman after woman gives birth to infants that appear to be primitive species of humans. Thirty-two-year-old Cedar Hawk Songmaker, adopted daughter of a pair of big-hearted, open-minded Minneapolis liberals, is as disturbed and uncertain as the rest of America around her. But for Cedar...


Details Future Home of the Living God

TitleFuture Home of the Living God
ISBN9780062694058
Author
Release DateNov 14th, 2017
PublisherHarper
LanguageEnglish
GenreFiction, Science Fiction, Dystopia, Adult, Fantasy
Rating

Reviews Future Home of the Living God

  • Angela M
    1970-01-01
    I woke up thinking about this book and even though I had finished reading it, I wasn't ready to leave it behind. I haven't been able to get it out of my head enough to engage in another book. This captivating story is beautifully written as we expect from Louise Erdrich. To those who hold dear Erdrich's stories filled with her love of her Native American heritage, I would urge you to not shy away from this book because you think she may have move...
  • Diane S ☔
    1970-01-01
    So, we have screwed up the world, no surprise there, but this time it has reached a cellular level. Evolution is taking a backwards step, chickens that now have the skins of lizards, a dragonfly with a three foot wing span, winter's that are no more and childbearing women are desperately needed. Pregnant women become prey to a new government intent on studying them and their fetuses. Not your typical world for an Erdrich novel, but a captivating ...
  • Cynthia
    1970-01-01
    I've never been a big fan of Erdrich though she's undeniably an excellent writer. With Future Home of the Living God I've become a fan. This is a grim book and what I've often found objectionable in Erdrich's writing is her over emphasized political views strangely even as I often agree with her stance I object to being hit on the head repeatedly with it. Future is a haunting story of a young woman caught in a grim future where women are reduced ...
  • Nancy
    1970-01-01
    In a world of governmental breakdown, wars, and natural disasters, winters without snow, the over expansion of American government, something--perhaps a virus-- has tampered with genomes to set off a cavalcade of reverse evolution. In this world lives one twenty-six year old pregnant woman, Cedar, writing to her unborn child. After an ultrasound, the doctor tells her to flee and go into hiding. Congress has revitalized articles of the Patriot Act...
  • Amanda NEVER MANDY
    1970-01-01
    **I received this book for free through Goodreads First Reads.**This book was a Dystopian Science Fiction mixed with a smidgen of something else I can’t put my finger on. Sarcastic humor…nope…umm…damn…what is that thought. Man I hate that. My brain is not connecting the dots that I need it to right now. I’m picturing The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy…shit. I could google this but I feel like that is the lazy way out. Sit and st...
  • Rebecca Foster
    1970-01-01
    (2.5; DNF @ 32%) This starts out feeling like the simple story of Cedar meeting her biological Native American parents and coming to terms with her out-of-wedlock pregnancy. It takes a long time to start resembling the dystopian novel it’s supposed to be, and the signs that something is awry seem too little and come too late to produce even mild alarm. I’d try something else by Erdrich, but I didn’t find her take on this genre worthwhile.
  • Katy
    1970-01-01
    I received my copy free through Goodreads Firstreads. I have an uncorrected proof so I'm sure the final book will be perfect. This one started out a bit slow, but builds very quickly. Stayed up reading past my bedtime. Written as a series of letters (a journal in a sense) to her unborn child. This one works -- I don't usually like stories told in 1st person, but this book held me captive until the end.
  • Alicia
    1970-01-01
    http://wordnerdy.blogspot.com/2017/07...I am both intrigued and depressed by this wave of post-apocalyptic fiction that is looking at issues of women's fertility. In this one, an unexplained event is causing evolutionary throwbacks--things seem to be going backwards. And so a pregnant woman begins writing a diary for her unborn child, chronicling political and natural events, domestic and larger-scale, as she (a Native child adopted by white uppe...
  • Diana
    1970-01-01
    Never have dystopian novels felt so potentially realistic.I love Louise Erdrich. I love her storytelling ability, I love the poetic language she uses, and I love how I learn odd, fascinating things when I read her books. What I love most is her humor, how it comes out of complex, interesting characters and often has a bitter tang. This one is different from most of her books, the linked novels that ambitiously create a whole world, set in and aro...
  • Bruce Katz
    1970-01-01
    OK, here's the thing: Every time I finish a book by Louise Erdrich, my first instinct is go out and buy another. This time is no different, but I do so with a sense of disorientation. "Future Home" feels like something of a mash-up that draws on dystopian fiction, feminist allegory, political commentary, religious meditation (there are many quotations from and references to Catholic writers, and then there's the title, of course), and more. By an...
  • Latkins
    1970-01-01
    This is a surprising and unusual novel, and at first I wasn't sure what to make of it. But I think it was its narrative voice which captured my attention and kept me intrigued to the end. Set in Minnesota, some time in the near future, it follows Cedar, who is Native American by birth, but was brought up by white, liberal parents, Sera and Glenn. The novel takes the form of Cedar's diary, addressed to her unborn child as she goes through pregnanc...
  • Amy Leigh
    1970-01-01
    If you enjoyed The Handmaid's Tale you will love this book! Cedar is 26 years old & four months pregnant. She lives in this dystopian world that is just beginning to change. Cedar lives with her adoptive parents who are liberal but mainly just hippies with degrees. Her mother gave her a letter from her birth-mother a year ago and now, while the world is falling apart, she decides to open it. It doesn't take long for her to decide to go meet his b...
  • Mainlinebooker
    1970-01-01
    Not having read any of the reviews, I had no idea what I was getting into. Having been a big fan of Erdrich's other novels, I assumed that this would again be a comparable success.However,it is a novel quite unlike anything she has written before. This speculative fiction portrays a young woman, Cedar, telling the story of her life to her unborn child through a notebook diary. Contrary to most dystopian novels, this was not set in the future. In ...
  • Shannon A
    1970-01-01
    Set in a near-dystopian world where nature has rebelled causing evolution to hit reverse; Cedar, a mother-to- be is attempting to find her real parents to gain some knowledge to her baby’s future. While society is going haywire the government begins rounding up all pregnant women, Cedar discovers the real truth behind her family and adoption.While reminiscent of Atwood’s The Handmaids Tale, this a fresh, moving reflection on the natural right...
  • Hanna
    1970-01-01
    3.5 ⭐'s. I really enjoyed this book and thought it was a worthwhile read. Erdrich played with some really interesting concepts here; I love the idea of evolution moving backwards & what that looks like in humans, animals, & our environment. Unfortunately, I didn't feel like there was enough world building to really understand what this looked like outside of the main characters experience. I found myself left with more questions than answers, w...
  • Kristin
    1970-01-01
    Powerful, prophetic and absolutely pertinent to our times, Louise Erdrich’s new novel "The Future Home of the Living God" is a horrifying haunt through women’s reproductive rights and the lengths the government will go to ensure the success of mankind as we know it. Riveting, yet repulsive and revealing at the same time, Erdrich captures the essence of “The Handmaid’s Tale” by Margaret Atwood and spins a new twist sure to tantalize and ...
  • Megan
    1970-01-01
    Classic Erdrich magical writing style, timeless themes of family and self-determination, plus a super dystopian twist in which the planet is fighting back with evolutionary/genetic tricks. The ending was not what I expected but I hope it's the first book in a series. The main character and the set up definitly justify another book.
  • Uriel Perez
    1970-01-01
    Like ‘The Handmaid’s Tale,’ ‘Children of Men,’ and ‘California,’ ‘Future Home of the Living God’ is a dystopian novel with a political bent, concerning female and natural rights. The world is moving backwards (i.e. extinct fauna is reclaiming the earth, landlines and snail mail are the most efficient forms of communication, children born bear the marks of our last hominid ancestors) and there is no explanation for it. The story ...
  • Diane Payne
    1970-01-01
    I thoroughly enjoyed "LaRose,"Erdrich's most recent novel. When I saw the word "dystopia" in a review for this novel, I paused, wondering if I was up for more bleakness. I wasn't. Like "The Handmaid's Tale," this novel also focuses on women and pregnancy. I thought it would focus more on taking back tribal land, but that part of the novel was on the back burner. I expected, probably unfairly, that Erdich would come up with a better tool/platform ...
  • Alyson
    1970-01-01
    I am still recovering from reading this book. Dystopian, apocalyptic, religious, anti-religious, gripping... So much to digest, A perfect choice for book clubs who are up for a challenge.
  • Kathy Cunningham
    1970-01-01
    Louise Eldrich’s FUTURE HOME OF THE LIVING GOD is a post-apocalyptic nightmarish novel that brings to mind Margaret Atwood’s HANDMAIDS TALE and MADDADAM trilogy, with bits of P. D. James’s CHILDREN OF MEN thrown in for good measure. The story is set in an undetermined future where genetic anomalies have resulted in the devolution of life on earth. Plants and animals both are mutating back to their ancient roots (saber-toothed tigers materia...
  • Vintage274
    1970-01-01
    I first encountered Louise Erdrich in a Contemporary American Literature class in grad school when I was entranced, intrigued, and mesmerized by Tracks. That encounter led me to reading all of her books, branching to other contemporary Native American authors, and finally settling into a concentration in Native American Literature and Native Spiritual Studies. Needless to say that when offered the opportunity to read Future Home of the Living God...
  • Portia
    1970-01-01
    Holy crap this book was AMAZING! I'm always excited to see a new book by Louise Erdrich and this one blew me away.  The prose is beautiful, the story is spooky and insanely topical, and I found myself wanting to do nothing but read this book.  Perfect for fans of The Handmaid's Tale (but more frightening in my opinion), I found it so easy to relate to Cedar and the other characters in this book.This book is a beautiful (yet terrifyin...
  • Cristine
    1970-01-01
    Dystopia is my favorite genre so I was excited to see this ARC arrive. I liked it well enough but didn't find it amazing. The parallels to "HandMaid's Tale" were obvious throughout the book but it didn't give me enough info on what was happening in the world beyond the main characters. The concept was extremely intriguing, that evolution was going backward. However, other than mentioning 3 feet long dragonflies and chickens that looked like iguan...
  • Gretchen
    1970-01-01
    Erdrich is a gifted writer. Her characters are vivid, complex, their lives feel real in both the quotidian details and the inestimable effects of their position in society. These strengths, and the bitter humor of a protagonist trapped by circumstances and fears beyond anyone's control, make this book gripping. However, it's hard not to compare a literary dystopia to all the ones that have come before, especially when it retreads so much ground c...
  • Sandra
    1970-01-01
    Cedar Hawk Songmaker, aged 26, is an Ojibwe, adopted by a Minneapolis couple years ago. Now that she finds herself pregnant, she goes to visit her birth parents to find out more about her roots. But the journey is perilous. Cedar lives during a strange time in the history of man, one in which evolution has suddenly started going backwards. It is also a time when it has been made illegal to be pregnant. As Cedar struggles to carry her pregnancy to...
  • Kim McGee
    1970-01-01
    Cedar has been raised by a nice Midwestern couple but when she goes searching for her birth mother she finds out that she is Native American. Something weird is happening to the birth rate and soon everyone is on the verge of hysteria. This affects Cedar because she has a secret that she tells her birth mother - she is pregnant. As the government begins rounding up all the pregnant women supposedly so that they can help what will be difficult pre...
  • Katy
    1970-01-01
    3.5 stars. I was deeply impressed with the author's ability to conjure up vivid, believable, and utterly unique characters and look forward to reading more of her books. I even enjoyed the searching, half-mystical Catholicism of the imperiled, pregnant main character, found it credible and engaging. And, having just read T.C. Boyle's disappointingly sketchy future-set stories in The Relive Box (one of which features a new pet called the catdog, s...
  • Heather O'Leary
    1970-01-01
    A departure from Erdrich previous books, Future Home of the Living God is the story of Cedar, a young pregnant woman who goes looking for her birth family as the apocalypse unfolds around her. The novel is written as a journal from Cedar to her unborn baby she tries to piece together her Native American heritage, her Catholic faith her and place and the place of her child in a world where evolution seems to be rapidly reversing and society is bre...
  • Caitlin
    1970-01-01
    In some ways reminiscent of The Handmaid's Tale (mainly through religious references), Future Home of the Living God takes the next step, imagining the sequestering and debasement of women as part of an apocalyptic regression of evolution. Time is turning back and healthy human babies are a rarity, as are any species of animal, as cats turn into creatures like sabertooth tigers, and birds to what appear to be dinosaurs. The format of this story i...