Crown of Blood by Nicola Tallis

Crown of Blood

"Good people, I am come hither to die, and by a law I am condemned to the same.” These were the heartbreaking words of a seventeen-year-old girl, Lady Jane Grey, as she stood on the scaffold awaiting death on a cold February morning in 1554. Minutes later her head was struck from her body with a single stroke of a heavy axe. Her death for high treason sent shockwaves through the Tudor world, and served as a gruesome reminder to all who aspired ...


Details Crown of Blood

TitleCrown of Blood
ISBN9781681775555
Author
Release DateDec 12th, 2017
PublisherPegasus Books
GenreNonfiction, History, Biography, Historical, English History, Tudor Period
Rating

Reviews Crown of Blood

  • Orsolya
    1970-01-01
    Jane Grey will forever be immortalized as the “Nine Days Queen” (it was actually 13) having ‘usurped’ the crown from Mary Tudor before Mary decided she had enough of that and snatched it off Jane’s head (figuratively). This tragic young lady, beheaded for her role at age 17, was more than just a martyr: she had poise, intelligence, decorum, and religious fortitude. Nicola Tallis, the resident historian of the Alison Weir Tours (which sh...
  • Anna
    1970-01-01
    I admit I knew little of the story and history of Lady Jane Grey, and much of my knowledge of that time period I gained through watching the TV show "Reign". Lady Jane was a girl of high intelect, virtue and piety. But even in her life of privilege and her royal blood line, her destiny was in the hands of her parents and men of political power. Unfortunately for Jane, those who sought to gain power upon Jane's royal lineage were only interested i...
  • Margaret Sankey
    1970-01-01
    Like a lot of the new Tudor stuff, this is an attempt to use modern methods on the available sources and break loose from Victorian assumptions about the motivations of Early Modern women. Tallis, who is a protegee of Alison Weir in the for-profit Country House tourism game, is looking at Jane Grey, and the world in which Tudors were two generations rooted, it was reasonable to try for a throne grab because it had worked before, and where religio...
  • Caroline
    1970-01-01
    Most people know the story of Lady Jane Grey, the 'Nine Days Queen' - actually thirteen but who's counting? She is perhaps one of the most tragic victims of the Tudor era - a girl who was only ever a pawn for the ambitions of unscrupulous men seeking power. She never wanted the throne, never sought it, and paid with her life for the mistakes of others. No wonder the sentimental Victorians swooned over her. Sadly, it seems Nicola Tallis does too.I...
  • Katie
    1970-01-01
    I received an advance copy of this book from NetGalley, and although Jane Grey is a terribly depressing subject, this was a fantastic read. Nicola Tallis does an amazing job of breaking down the myths surrounding Lady Jane and clears up some of the foggy details of her life. Deeply researched and carefully constructed, the story is easy to follow, providing a lot of detail about Jane's family and her contemporaries which helps readers understand ...
  • Margaret
    1970-01-01
    An excellent debut for historian Nicola Tallis.I learned a lot about Jane Grey from her excellent research. I knew that Lady Jane was educated, I just hadn't realised to what degree. I also didn't realise just what a complete fecking idiot she had for a father.Well written, well researched and totally readable.
  • Gumble's Yard
    1970-01-01
    Nicola Tallis together with Sarah Gristwood is one of the resident historians on Alison Weir's Tudor themed historical tours, something which explains a number of aspects of this solidly written biography: the front and back cover reviews from Weir and Gristwood; the concentration on the various stately homes and other historical sites where Jane was based and the Appendix describing those sites; the way in which the book often strays towards his...
  • Susan Abernethy
    1970-01-01
    Link to my review of this book:https://flhwnotesandreviews.com/2017/...
  • Cynthia
    1970-01-01
    Lady Jane Grey is not someone with whom I am very familiar and that is what caught my eye when I saw this on the Goodreads First Reads page. Tudor history is quite fascinating to me. And I now have a picture of the 17 year old who was thrust onto the British throne for thirteen days before being arrested and ultimately beheaded as a traitor.Nicola Tallis writes history that is well researched and she tells a rich and satisfying story that does no...
  • Caroline
    1970-01-01
    Meh. If you love the Tudors and don't know anything about Jane Grey, this might be for you. Or if you are someone who doesn't mind the "nobody expected the Spanish Inquisition" style of writing. At the end of every chapter and sometimes several times in between, we are told that someone couldn't have imagined what was going to happen or what had just happened and I got sick of it. Otherwise, not badly written. But if this is a subject you already...
  • V.E. Lynne
    1970-01-01
    The title of this book, 'Crown of Blood: The Deadly Inheritance of Lady Jane Grey', says it all about the short and extremely tragic life of the famous 'nine days queen' (it was actually thirteen days). When it became obvious in early 1553 that the boy king, Edward VI, was dying, the throne was effectively up for grabs: there was no male heir and Henry VIII's two daughters, Mary and Elizabeth, were still officially illegitimate, although they had...
  • Samantha
    1970-01-01
    The story of Lady Jane Grey has captivated many people since her death over 460 years ago. She is typically thought of as a romantic figure, a pawn in greater men's schemes. Of course, she was that to a certain extent, but this biography demonstrates that she was also a young woman of unusual intellect and fanatic faith. She did not ask for the crown, but once she had it she also demanded the crown jewels. She held fast to her faith and had conte...
  • Carolyn Thomas
    1970-01-01
    So how was it that LADY Jane Grey became QUEEN Jane (even if only for 9 - or 13 - days)?In 1544 Henry VIII felt no need to look further than his three children - Edward, Mary, Elizabeth - when ordering the succession. But as he lay dying at the end of 1546 things obviously looked a little different. Edward was still to remain his undoubted successor, followed by Mary and Elizabeth (who still remained legally illegitimate) and any heirs that they ...
  • Joy
    1970-01-01
    My review on Crown of Blood: The Deadly Inheritance of Lady Jane Grey by Nicola Tallis.I enjoyed this book and found it well informed and for sure a lot of work has been put into it. It’s hard to cover Jane’s life, I’ve read others books on Jane and how much I love the film ‘Lady Jane’ I’m aware that some people could be disappointed that Jane’s life was no love story. But this book I feel covers move the truth on how Jane’s life ...
  • Gillian
    1970-01-01
    This book is heart-shattering - but in the best possible way.I was first introduced to Lady Jane Grey when I was in the sixth grade and at the very start of a life-long obsession with all things Tudor. I wish I remembered the name of that book, but all that I remember is that it was a historical fiction told from Jane's POV and, having read Tallis' book, was remarkably accurate. Crown of Blood is well-researched and well-written: a winning combin...
  • Angela Powell
    1970-01-01
    This book was so thoroughly researched and I commend the author for including such a hearty Notes and References section, appendixes, and bibliography. As a "Google reader", I tend to pause my reading to look things up I want to know more, and every paragraph of this book had several notations that added more at the back of the book. For good reason, there was plenty in this book. Lady Jane Grey, the 9 Days Queen, was a victim of several bad circ...
  • Inés
    1970-01-01
    A very complete and mild look to the life and death of the Nine Days Queen.Since I started to develop interest for History and the Tudor era, I was curious about the forgotten ones: for me, Edward VI and Jane Grey. Most people know about Mary I and Elizabeth I, but I've met people that didn't even know that Henry VIII had a son who got to reign for six years. Much less about his cousin Jane, who only ruled for nine days days.Her story is indeed a...
  • Jonathan
    1970-01-01
    The Crown of Blood: The deadly inheritance of Lady Jane Grey by Nicola Tallis is a fast enjoyable read bc the author keeps the focus on Jane with few tangents. Jane Grey is the great niece of Henry VIII. The power hungry John Dudley, Duke of Northumberland convinces Jane's weak-minded father Henry Grey (perhaps the stupidest man one will ever read about in their life) to marry his daughter Jane off to Northumberland's son Guildford while Northumb...
  • Manda
    1970-01-01
    The short, tragic life of Lady Jane Grey is more often than not overlooked in Tudor biography, so it's good to see her get her due as a Queen of England - albeit briefly - and as a well-known intellectual of her day whose fate served as a cautionary tale to the Lady Elizabeth, as the future queen was then known, not to press her own claim too strongly as long as Mary Tudor still lived. Tallis rightly supposes that much of the fascination with Jan...
  • Eline
    1970-01-01
    Lady Jane Grey has been a mysthical person, of royal blood, for almost 400 years but thanks to Tallis you can finally have a grasp on the person that was devoted to her religion, her person, her family, who was a brave and courageous young woman who was dragged into the evil plans of her parents and parent's in law. The young girl who did not even wanted the Crown has been punished for the crimes the adults around her had commited. She did inheri...
  • Rachel Schuldenfrei
    1970-01-01
    I've been interested in Jane Grey since visiting the Tower of London as a teenager. I've read briefly about her in various histories about the Tudor era but this is the first extensive study of her I have read. The book focused on her studies and religious convictions which as it turns out were very impressive for someone so young. Rather than portraying Jane as just a victim of her time and place (which she certainly was), Tallis shows her stren...
  • Lauren
    1970-01-01
    As a person with a very limited knowledge in English history, I found this book very easy to read and understand, well researched and very approachable. Nicola Tallis is able to make her argument while telling a stirring narrative of Jane Grey's life and death. She does add in speculation such as "Lady Jane might have felt/though..." with little or no evidence to back it up, but I don't believe that this impedes the quality of the book.
  • BonnieL
    1970-01-01
    Not a terrible book - the history is all there, the few real facts known about Lady Jane Grey are well presented. But there is far too much speculation, thoughts and motives attributed without any historical proof and it becomes semi-fictional. Perhaps it should have been characterized as historical fiction. There are better biographies of Lady Jane Grey already published.
  • Hannah
    1970-01-01
    An accessible account of the life & death of Lady Jane GreySeems well researched, debunking some of the assumptions that are traditionally made about Jane. It explains the background and the political manoeuvrings well.
  • Lucy
    1970-01-01
    Not a fan of her style of writing. Way too gushy and breathless style. Much prefer Eric Ives' Jane Grey. Am I the only one who thinks it weird that Sarah Gristwood, Tracey Borman, Alison Weir and Nicola Tallis continuously give each other 5 star gushing reviews?
  • Don
    1970-01-01
    excellent book. felt as if I was there. strongly recommend. Has enlightened me on a subject I never really understood before and in a way that held my attention throughout even though I knew the ending.
  • Maura Heaphy
    1970-01-01
    Fascinating topic, well-researched, but the author has been poorly served by her editor/publisher: frequent use of awkward phrasing and misused words, assuming (I suppose) that it sounds "posh." (Things don't "happen," they "transpire." On almost every ...single ...page ...)
  • Mike Shoop
    1970-01-01
    Good readable nonfiction about this terrible Tudor tragedy. Tudor fans will not find a whole lot of new material here, but this would serve as a good introduction to someone new to the subject of Lady Jane Grey and her place in England's history.
  • a catesby
    1970-01-01
    Very easy readWell written and enjoyable read despite the dark subject. Gives a good insight of both the times and of Jane , breaking a lot of the misinterpreted stereotypes of her. Good history writer.