The Line Becomes A River by Francisco Cantú

The Line Becomes A River

"A beautiful, fiercely honest, and nevertheless deeply empathetic look at those who police the border and the migrants who risk - and lose - their lives crossing it. In a time of often ill-informed or downright deceitful political rhetoric, this book is an invaluable corrective."—Phil KlayFor Francisco Cantú, the border is in the blood: his mother, a park ranger and daughter of a Mexican immigrant, raised him in the scrublands of the Southwest...


Details The Line Becomes A River

TitleThe Line Becomes A River
Author
Release DateFeb 6th, 2018
PublisherRiverhead Books
LanguageEnglish
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Politics, Biography Memoir, Biography, Adult, The United States Of America
Rating

Reviews The Line Becomes A River

  • Maureen
    1970-01-01
    *3.5 STARS*Francisco Cantú grew up on the US / Mexican border where his mother, ( a second generation Mexican - American ) was a park ranger. Francisco loved the landscape - the national parks and desert landscapes, and living in close proximity to the border ignited a curiosity in him to learn more about border control. He decided to pursue a degree in border relations, and although his studies provided some insight into the problems, he needed...
  • Meike
    1970-01-01
    "When I was in school, I spent all this time studying international relations, immigration, border security. I was always reading about policy and economics, looking at all these complex academic ways of addressing this big unsolvable problem. When I made the decision to apply for this job, I had the idea that I'd see things in the patrol that would somehow unlock the border for me, you know? I thought I'd come up with all sorts of answers. And t...
  • Wendy Trevino
    1970-01-01
    This is a book for the #bluelivesmatter & #alllivesmatter crowd. I hate that crowd.
  • Oki
    1970-01-01
    I don't find the ethics of this book interesting, nuanced, complex, or human. What's being posed here, is the worst that literature has to offer, and is a variation of a genre already used by the cultural propagandists of the so-called "free world." It's a cop-loving dead end of a universe, made by collaborating with the forces of death that this book pretends to mourn, it is selfish and degrading. This book tries to humanize hunting down other p...
  • Stephen
    1970-01-01
    thanks to the publishers and netgalley for a free copy in return for an open and honest reviewfound this book very interesting in light of current developments in american politics and history. the author expresses himself as the dehumanisation of the whole process of deportation and border patrol but at same lights gives some insight into mexican history too. The first part of the book took awhile to get going for me but the latter part of the b...
  • Roman Clodia
    1970-01-01
    So you see, there is nothing that can keep me from crossing. My boys are not dogs to be abandoned in the street. I will walk through the desert for five days, eight days, ten days, whatever it takes to be with them. I'll eat grass, I'll eat cactus, I'll drink filthy cattle water, I'll drink nothing at all. I'll run and hide from la migra, I'll pay the mafias whatever I have to. They can take my money, they can rob my family, they can lock me away...
  • Neil
    1970-01-01
    "Some politicians in the United States think that if a mother or father is deported, this will cause the entire family to move back to Mexico. But in fact, the mothers and fathers with the best family values will want their family to stay in the U.S., they will cross the border again and again to be with them. So you see, these same people, the ones with the most dedication to their family, they begin to build up a record of deportation, they hav...
  • Jessica
    1970-01-01
    Whilst I was continually intrigued by the premise of this book, and eager to hear from the unique standpoint Cantú speaks from, I’m sorry to say that I felt the first half of this rather dry and detached. Rather like the desert landscape and laddish culture he starts work among.However, as Cantú begins to fall deeper down the rabbit hole that is his job, I began to get sucked in behind him. When he speaks from personal experience there is emo...
  • Neil
    1970-01-01
    I received a free copy via Netgalley in exchange for a honest review.This is a hard hitting Biography showing how a job affects the people and to what lengths people will go to cross a border.Scary.
  • Rebecca
    1970-01-01
    THE LINE BECOMES A RIVER, Francisco Cantú’s fiercely lyrical and eerily prescient debut, could not have come at a more urgent time. As the migration of human bodies across borders becomes more politicized and militarized, Cantú’s writing shines through the misinformation and propaganda with heartbreaking clarity, providing necessary insight into the tangled web of humanity, separation, violence, and legislation that characterizes the U.S.-M...
  • Virginia
    1970-01-01
    A refreshingly objective, yet personal look at the US-Mexico Border and the issues it carries. Francisco Cantu served as a field agent for the US Border Patrol and graduated up the ranks, eventually leaving to continue his studies. His perspective as an agent and a citizen as eye-opening and intriguing as he doesn't seem to take a side on this controversial issue. Instead, he presents his experience dealing with regular people as well as criminal...
  • Sara
    1970-01-01
    The author tells other people’s stories while directly causing and profiting from their pain. This is a book about his contributions to other people’s suffering that also gives extremely skewed look at life on the border that provides fodder for right wing anti-immigration sentiments.
  • Fox
    1970-01-01
    Disgusting. If you have any compassion for the people who cross the border, do not read this trash.
  • Jenn
    1970-01-01
    Pro-border patrol propaganda.
  • Jillian Doherty
    1970-01-01
    Read this book - everyone should!Open your mind to needed, unbiased perspective; Cantú brilliantly illustrates how blind we are to this razor fine line between humanity and objectification. Written with the literary charm of Juno Diaz, and the vitally informative voice of Masha Gessen. It's as personal as it is judgeless; the human stories that hit home, that we're all working to better understand today - the wall, boarder patrol, and gathering ...
  • Lydia
    1970-01-01
    Incredible. It has changed the way I read and digest the news. A poetic, honest, and heartbreaking look at life on the border, from the side of an agent whose duty is to uphold the laws, as well as those trying to get around them. So important and timely. Thank you, Francisco Cantu, for your work.
  • Kevin
    1970-01-01
    I expected this to be a somewhat dry but fascinating book. What I got was a curiously intriguing piece of writing.I think, given this was an account of a time in a branch of law enforcement, I was expecting a very procedural account of outlandish experiences. The reality is that it's a very stylised collection of everyday life in the border patrol. The first two sections of the book almost read like freeform prose - the paragraphs leap about, the...
  • Sara Cutaia
    1970-01-01
    This is definitely a book to look for in 2018. Fascinating and gripping, Cantu takes us through the deserts of the south as a Border Patrol Agent, showing us the humanity in the humans he routinely encountered crossing the border. I was blown away with both the emotional depth and the historical accuracy. Cantu is not only a talented writer, but also a deeply caring soul who presents the immigration issues as they are, without bias, while also be...
  • Amy
    1970-01-01
    I have an ARC copy of this book from the MPIBA Fall Discovery Show. Francisco Cantu spoke there, and I had the chance to meet him. Cantu writes well, showing us his experiences without commentary, allowing the reader to draw conclusions. I appreciated the way he wove in outside material from other writers or other sources. There were times I wanted to pick up a pen and underline sentences or note ideas in the margins. This is the type of book tha...
  • Uriel Perez
    1970-01-01
    Francisco Cantú writes with incredible insight and opens up the conversation regarding immigration and human rights that so desperately needs to be had right now. Cantú writes of his time in the Border Patrol, the ethical and moral conflict he faced as a second-generation Mexican American in the business of deporting migrants and assess the state of the US's broken immigration system. THE LINE BECOMES A RIVER is written with ferocious honesty, ...
  • Sophie Childs
    1970-01-01
    This is a bittersweet, thought provoking memoir that gives an insight into what life is like for border patrols and migrants alike. Through Cantu's personal experiences, we learn more about an issue that is far from black and white. Detailing his experiences both as a border guard and then in trying to build a life after leaving the service, we learn more about how difficult life is like living near the border, told through a stream of easy-to-re...
  • Phil
    1970-01-01
    This book is best described as skittish. Whilst the writing is good, the editing or structure really needs work. It almost appears if the author has taken his diary and removed the dates. One paragraph telling one story will end and the next will be completely unrelated. I also think the dream sequences are filler and offer very little to the reader. All in all this felt like a good writer without a story to tell. It wasn't until the end and the ...
  • Michael Veselik
    1970-01-01
    Would give this a 4.5 if I had that option. the first part of the book is a little slow and disjointed, but is important to understand the second half. Cantu brings a unique perspective on the border to an important debate. He also shares the voice of those deeply affected by a majorly flawed immigration system. I learned a great deal about this artificial construct of the border and how it has shaped a deadly and bloody history. Definitely worth...
  • Andrew
    1970-01-01
    One of those lyrical takes on current events told from the ground level. An American border guard of distant Mexican heritage patrols the desert in Arizona. The border gets too close to him, and he brings it very close to you.
  • Kristen Beverly
    1970-01-01
    Lots of really great food for thought.
  • Ryan
    1970-01-01
    A stirring and heartfelt look at the crisis unfolding daily on the US-Mexico border. Cantu writes with compassion and heart, and his words sing with both love and mourning. Whatever you think you know about immigration, you owe it to yourself to see the spotlight Cantu has shone on this incendiary topic. Highly recommended!
  • Amy
    1970-01-01
    I would recommend this book to anyone with even a vague interest in the US Mexico Border. Exceptionally well-written, and thoughtfully put together. Cantu brings a vast range of personal, academic, and professional experience to the table.
  • Charles
    1970-01-01
    The Line Becomes a River is an interesting book on a subject I would probably not have really thought to read about. Generally law enforcement autobiographies seem to hinge on people who have been involved in high profile cases or with high profile agencies/areas (e.g NYPD), which is something that sets this book aside from the others. Definitely a plus there.However, the book falls into a number of other somewhat predictable traps, such as the "...
  • Marilyn Smith
    1970-01-01
    This is a "third rail" book about the US/Mexico border. Cantu's daily experience as an agent focuses on the dichotomy of the border. These words say it best for me about this extraordinary piece: searing, brilliant,barbaric and ultimately human.