Tropic of Squalor by Mary Karr

Tropic of Squalor

A new volume of poetry from the New York Times bestselling and esteemed author of The Liar’s Club and Lit.Long before she earned accolades for her genre-defining memoirs, Mary Karr was winning poetry prizes. Now the beloved author returns with a collection of bracing poems as visceral and deeply felt and hilarious as her memoirs. In Tropic of Squalor, Karr dares to address the numinous—that mystery some of us hope towards in secret, or maybe ...


Details Tropic of Squalor

TitleTropic of Squalor
ISBN9780062699848
Author
Release DateMay 8th, 2018
PublisherHarper
GenrePoetry
Rating

Reviews Tropic of Squalor

  • Tucker
    2018-04-05
    I read and loved Mary Karr’s memoirs: “Lit” and “The Liar’s Club,” but I had not previously read any of her poetry. In her new collection “Tropic of Squalor,” I felt as though I was reading a different author - both in character and tone. There were some poems and lines within poems that were thought-provoking and really resonated with me. However, on the whole this collection was too dark and bleak for this reader. Maybe I would ...
  • Rebecca Foster
    2018-02-12
    Mary Karr is mostly known as a memoirist, but this is actually her fifth poetry collection. Death is a major theme, with David Foster Wallace’s suicide (“Among genii, whoever dies first wins. / Or so he thought.”) and 9/11 getting multiple mentions. Karr also writes self-deprecatingly about her Texas childhood (“my kidhood (whose torments / Did fill many profitable volumes)”; “Whole years I lost in the kingdom / Of mine own skull”)....
  • Diane S ☔
    2018-05-22
    3.5 review soon.
  • Marne Wilson
    2018-03-21
    I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway, and I am definitely not the right reader for it. Karr deals with some dark subject matter here, and her coping strategy is a thick layer of cynicism. For example, take these lines from "The Age of Criticism," where she describes the suicide of a fellow poet: "I believed there might be no one more alluring alive./ But she killed herself. Last April, widowed at sixty,/ she jumped off the high stadium of some...
  • L K Simonds
    2018-05-24
    What can I say? This is classic Mary Karr: No holds barred poems about life in the Tropic of Squalor, that is, under the curse. Ms. Karr's observations are poignant and almost always have a comic element, even if it's dark. The poems are full of familiar themes for those who've read her memoirs. I don't read a lot of poetry, and my taste runs toward poets like Frost and Yeats and Dickinson, but I keep trying, mostly unsuccessfully, to expand my h...
  • Glenda
    2018-05-12
    “Tropic of Squalor” ranges in subject from the personal to the political. Many of the poems have an autobiographical voice, and an early poem, “Illiterate Progenitor,” speaks to life with a father “undiluted by the written word.” This poem inspired me to write about my own family. And although Karr never mentions political figures by name, astute readers will understand the subtext. As with her memoir “The Liar’s Club,” Karr inf...
  • Sara Habein
    2018-05-28
    So much good stuff in here. Sad, thoughtful, reverent, maybe sometimes a little too on the nose, but that's ok too.
  • Maughn Gregory
    2018-06-18
    All spiritual writing should be this grungy, this clear-eyed, this smart.
  • Harry
    2018-05-15
    Must reads:1. The Age of Criticism (DFW/Franzen influences?)2. The Child Abuse Tour3. Obadiah: A Perfect Mess
  • Melissa
    2018-04-28
    Book 2 for #readathon #deweys24hourreadathon - I’d never read Mary Karr’s poetry before, didn’t even know she had previous collections 🙀 but I have read her memoir Lit. Very interesting, I liked the poem cycle that made up the last half of this collection