Red Clocks by Leni Zumas

Red Clocks

Five women. One question. What is a woman for?In this ferociously imaginative novel, abortion is once again illegal in America, in-vitro fertilization is banned, and the Personhood Amendment grants rights of life, liberty, and property to every embryo. In a small Oregon fishing town, five very different women navigate these new barriers alongside age-old questions surrounding motherhood, identity, and freedom.Ro, a single high-school teacher, is ...


Details Red Clocks

TitleRed Clocks
ISBN9780316434812
Author
Release DateJan 16th, 2018
PublisherLittle, Brown and Company
LanguageEnglish
GenreFiction, Science Fiction, Feminism, Dystopia
Rating

Reviews Red Clocks

  • Emily May
    1970-01-01
    I guess we can probably expect more of these weird feminist(?) dystopias in the wake of The Handmaid's Tale's Hulu series. Between this and the superhero-movie-turned-superhero-book trend, you can pretty much predict the new book trends based on what's popular on the big and small screens.Here, Zumas imagines a United States where the Personhood Amendment gives rights to unborn embryos, outlawing abortion and IVF (because said embryos cannot give...
  • Lotte
    1970-01-01
    4.25/5.Red Clocks can be described as a dystopian novel, but it feels entirely contemporary. Instead of creating a far-off dystopian society, Leni Zumas picks up on trends in our current political climate and thinks them through. What are the consequences of making abortion illegal in the US? How does a woman trying to have a baby on her own navigate a world in which in vitro fertilization is banned and only married couples are allowed to adopt? ...
  • Lolly K Dandeneau
    1970-01-01
    via my blog: https://bookstalkerblog.wordpress.com/“Everyone wants charms, but thirty-two years on earth have convinced the mender charms are purely for show.”In this novel, abortion is illegal, in-vitro fertilization is banned and soon single people won’t be allowed to adopt. The Personhood Ammendment grants rights to embryos (that cannot possibly give permission to be born) and desperate women seek help, anywhere they can. For some, it is...
  • Claire Fuller
    1970-01-01
    Really enjoyable and thought-provoking read about five women in a version of the United States where abortion and IVF are banned, and all adoptions must be by couples (which doesn't seem so far from reality). The story ticked over quickly, and I found the structure very easy to get into (many short sections - some of which are about an Icelandic explorer). All of them find the courage to stand up for what they want, rather than agreeing to what t...
  • Kirsten
    1970-01-01
    this book wrecked me. i wanted to read it over again immediately.
  • Hanna
    1970-01-01
    I've never quite understood what it meant for someone's writing to be "lyrical" and then I picked up an ARC of Red Clocks and suddenly knew. Leni Zumas tells the stories of five different women (4 primarily) with beautiful prose. We follow the trials of a young girl seeking an abortion in a world where abortion is illegal & dangerous, a woman on the quest to have children when in vitro fertilization is illegal & folks aren't allowed to adopt with...
  • Chelsea Bieker
    1970-01-01
    This book. Read this book. Not only is it a terrifying glimpse of our current and future political times (women's reproductive rights completely taken away) it's a layered, intense portrayal of women and the demands society places on them. But it's also the most beautiful innovative writing you could hope to read, every line, every description a surprise. I have loved Zumas' other works as well, and this is no exception. I read it in a single sit...
  • Cynthia Shannon
    1970-01-01
    This book really resonated on so many levels.
  • Megan Tristao
    1970-01-01
    Really more of a 3.5, but I'm rounding up to give this book the benefit of the doubt as I've been in a bit of a reading slump. It took me longer than it should have to finish this book, but I did enjoy Zumas' descriptive writing and characterization. Overall, I didn't feel the "oompf" from this book that I probably should have. I do anticipate this will be a popular title in 2018 given current debates around reproductive rights. I also thought Ei...
  • Toni
    1970-01-01
    Thank you to A Likely Story Book Store for the ARC of Red Clocks in exchange for a review.I actually gave this 3.5 stars but rounded it up. I don't usually do that but..........it was appropriate in this case.I never in a million years believed that I would enjoy this novel (a 3 day read) and it may be hard to explain why. Chapter 1 was very confusing so the story didn't grab me at first nor did I get warm fuzzies as to what was to come. Zumas ha...