Paris by the Book by Liam Callanan

Paris by the Book

A missing person, a grieving family, a curious clue: a half-finished manuscript set in Paris. Heading off in search of its author, a mother and her daughters find themselves in France, rescuing a failing bookstore and drawing closer to unexpected truths.Once a week, I chase men who are not my husband….When eccentric novelist Robert Eady abruptly vanishes, he leaves behind his wife, Leah, their daughters, and, hidden in an unexpected spot, plane...


Details Paris by the Book

TitleParis by the Book
ISBN9781101986271
Author
Release DateApr 3rd, 2018
PublisherDutton
LanguageEnglish
GenreFiction, Mystery, Cultural, France
Rating

Reviews Paris by the Book

  • Theresa Alan
    1970-01-01
    DNF When writer Robert Eady disappears, his wife, Leah, and daughters, Ellie and Daphne, don’t know if he’s alive or dead. I did want to find out the mystery of what happened to him, but unfortunately, the writing style made me not care enough to actually finish this book. Leah’s narration is incredibly odd. She’ll skim over months and months. Events will abruptly happen. There is just no continuity in the narrative, and it bugged the hec...
  • Lisa
    1970-01-01
    Paris by the BookLiam CallananMY RATING ⭐⭐⭐▫▫PUBLISHER Dutton PUBLISHED April 3, 2018A touching story of a family consumed by a mysterious disappearance that launches them on a literary journey in the City of Light. SUMMARYThey met outside a bookstore in Wisconsin! Leah, a former film student, whose favorite film was The Red Balloon by Albert Lamorisse and Robert, a struggling author, loved the Madeline books by Ludwig Bemelmans. The tw...
  • Nikki (Saturday Nite Reader)
    1970-01-01
    3.5 starsIs Leah a widow? For almost a year, she is unsure. Her husband, Robert, vanishes and I don’t say suddenly, because it is like him to take a break from the family from time to time: this time, he doesn’t leave a note and does not return. Is he leaving her clues to his whereabouts? Conflicted with her emotions, Leah and her daughters, Ellie and Daphne, take a trip to Paris in hopes of finding their father; if he is still alive.The book...
  • Bernadette
    1970-01-01
    3.5 StarsI requested Paris by the Book from NetGalley initially because I liked the title and the cover. Then there was that opening line: “Once a week, I chase men who are not my husband...”Liam Callanan’s novel is a charming yet mysterious story about Leah and Robert Eady. The couple have two daughters, Daphne and Ellie and the family appears to have a relatively happy life until Robert, a novelist, disappears. Leah finds a clue that lead...
  • Julie Failla Earhart
    1970-01-01
    First there is the title: What an enticement! Paris and books; I GOTTA read this novel.Then there is the synopsis: An eccentric novelist who has gone missing. His grieving family. A bookstore. An unfinished manuscript by said missing novelist. I was already anticipating how wonderful this book would be. Then there is the first sentence: “Once a week, I chase men who are not my husband.” I can’t wait to get my hands on a copy of this novel.A...
  • Mike
    1970-01-01
    After her husband mysteriously disappears, Leah finds a clue that leads her and her two daughters to track him in Paris. But as their search wanes, the three become increasingly enchanted by the City of Lights.An appealing premise and the story reads like a love letter to Paris.
  • Jo Dervan
    1970-01-01
    Leah and Robert met when she tried to steal a copy of the book The Red Balloon from a book store in Milwaukee. Leah was an impoverished grad student in film studies whose specialty was the movie, The Red Balloon. She knew everything about Lamorisse, the creator of the movie. Robert was a children’s book author and his favorite book about children in Paris was Madeline by Bemelmans. Their interest in Paris became a focal point for their romance....
  • Adriana
    1970-01-01
    The basic plotline of a disappearing father and the family's desperate moves to find him is gripping enough, add the fact that it's set in a Parisian bookshop and I was bound to enjoy it.However, solid character development and strong plot beats can't make up for the fact that the story moves at a glacial pace. I sometimes felt like I'd been reading for 100 pages when only 10 had been consumed, and it wasn't because it was super interesting or ma...
  • Kate Klassa
    1970-01-01
    Once a week, I chase men who are not my husband….I thought I'd be hooked from the first sentence, and the prologue certainly captured my interest, but the subsequent chapters quickly ended the appeal. The book follows Leah, the wife of an eccentric novelist Robert, as she decides to move to Paris with her two daughters after her husband goes missing. While I enjoyed the more minor parts of the story, particularly the two daughters' lives, I had...
  • Gwen
    1970-01-01
    I read this family drama/broken marriage thriller/book-for-book-lovers all nearly all the way through, hoping it would decide what kind of narrative it was so I could connect with it...but no luck.There are moments of good writing, interesting plot lines, and promising character development, and then it lapses back into jumbled time tables, endless, repetitive descriptions of the narrator’s emotions, and cliff-hanger chapter endings that end up...
  • Julia Wilson
    1970-01-01
    Paris By The Book by Liam Callanan is a contemporary tale of love, loss and books. It is a comprehensive read that will consume.The reader 'travels' to Paris from the comfort of the sofa. We 'experience' all the familiar locations and add some new ones too.Paris By The Book is a book lovers paradise as we take a trip through many book locations. Some I had heard of but not others. The book is a personal tale too. It is living through loss. It is ...
  • Laura
    1970-01-01
    If only the title and the blurbage hadn't led me to believe that there'd be so much more about Paris!The premise is simple: a husband disappears, the left-behind wife and daughters wait and then travel to Paris (based on a clue left by him) to search for him. It doesn't quite go that easily for them, but the life they make for themselves in Paris helps them get used to the idea that they can survive without him (although they keep searching). Wha...
  • Lauren
    1970-01-01
    Perfect example of when a good idea gets derailed by less than great writing. SO MANY COMMAS! I was annoyed within 20 pages, but kept going because the story is actually interesting. With the family drama and the disparity of losing their father/husband, the emotional depth was potentially there, but the writing was a huge distraction for me. Callanan has a definite issue with run on sentences that make it difficult to read and translate what is ...
  • Jill Frederickson
    1970-01-01
    I found this book enchanting. It draws the reader in and keeps them off balance with the protagonist as she negotiates her new normal. It represents Paris through a variety of literary filters and adds its own spin. I enjoyed the settings, the characters and the way it did not take the easy way out.
  • Cookie6102
    1970-01-01
    Paris by the Book is a combination of mystery and the idea of starting over again, as well as a tribute to the City of Light itself. The city features prominently as Leah and her daughters decide to create a new life there in the wake of their old one, one in which Leah's husband and the girls' father has left them. Robert has disappeared with only few clues as to why, and Leah tries to piece together the reasons for his absence from their existe...
  • Karin Schott
    1970-01-01
    If you are expecting a Paris Bookshop kinda read this is not it. A husband is lost. His family does not know if he is alive or dead. Clues, real and maybe imagined, lead a wife and daughters to Paris, where they buy a book store.I felt that the emotional weight of this book was weak. I found myself impatient with the abandoned wife who had this privileged opportunity. I wanted to see her more angry. I wanted this to be a story someone in limbo wh...
  • Sarah
    1970-01-01
    I received an eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. That has no bearing on my thoughts and opinions going forward. This story was frustrating to read. Not because I disliked it, but more because the main character, Leah, would say and do things that would just make me ask, "What are you doing?" aggressively, and wanting to throw the book (which happens to be on my Kindle) across the room, but I don't.What drew me to this book init...
  • Gaele
    1970-01-01
    Far from being a quiet story about the life of a Paris bookstore, this story is about the disappearance of a father and husband, and the family’s search to find him, or clues about why he left. Months after the eccentric Robert disappeared, his wife Leah and her daughthers are still finding clues – the most important being airline tickets to Paris. Armed with questions and curiosity, the women head off to Paris to start their search. When an ...
  • Kidlitter
    1970-01-01
    The idea of a protagonist escaping their current circumstances and fleeing to a foreign city to reflect and solve the mysteries of life is a classic literary trope. Tant pis that this book does such a poor job of it. Leah is a middle-aged mid-Western wife and mother, an academic speechwriter and frustrated academic. She is a wishy washy character, an unreliable narrator who seems shocked that her Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans-obsessed, failed nove...
  • Sandy
    1970-01-01
    The premise of “Paris by the Book” fascinated me. When Leah and Robert first met, they had an instant connection through their favorite children’s books. She “The Red Balloon” by Lamorisse, but her obsession was more with the film than the book. He, a children’s book author: the entire Madeline series by Bemelmans. They were both totally enamored with Paris. He promised they would go together someday.Their marriage was very impromptu,...
  • Marco
    1970-01-01
    A really serious book about a husband with mental illness, the wife who searches for him after he goes missing, and a city of love turned into a maze of grief.When her writer husband Robert first disappears for a few days, Leah doesn't worry. Then when he doesn't come back, Leah knows this time it's different (he's been gone for days at a time before). The only clue is an unfinished manuscript and a promise they made in the early days of their ma...
  • Jill Elizabeth
    1970-01-01
    I have been reading other First Readers' reviews, and am surprised that my reaction to the book was so different than so many others... I found the pacing to work for this novel - it is slower to build than many family dramas, but I felt that contributed to the feeling that Leah's life was floundering as she and her girls tried to come to terms with their disappeared father. I found Leah frustrating - Robert WAY more so (I have sympathy for him, ...
  • Zachary Houle
    1970-01-01
    Paris, France, is often viewed as a magical place in fiction, and with good reason. As the hangout of Hemingway and Fitzgerald among others, it is a place where a great deal of English and French literature has been born. Heck, there’s even a popular English language bookstore called Shakespeare and Company (and I know of a guy who worked there and — surprise, surprise — published a book about his time spent there) which just goes t...
  • Tamara Morning
    1970-01-01
    Robert Eady is a novelist, an unconventional one who takes writing breaks from real life and his responsibilities, leaving his wife, Leah, to pay the bills and take care of the kids. The marriage is faltering, but Leah is used to Robert’s disappearances—he’s an artist, after all—so she doesn’t think much of it when he doesn’t come back from a run one day, even though he didn’t leave a note like he usually does.Until the disappearanc...
  • Sharon
    1970-01-01
    I’ve loved the books I’ve read that were set in bookstores so I was eager to read this one after I read the description. The beginning was confusing but once the story moved to Paris and into the bookstore, it turned a corner for me and I was engaged by the charismatic George, the adorable Peter and Annabelle, crotchety Madame, and the enigmatic Declan as well as the sense of place Callanan’s descriptions of Paris provided. The single fly i...
  • Joan Happel
    1970-01-01
    Thank you to Dutton for an Advanced Reader’s Copy of Paris by the Book by Liam Callanan A novel set in a bookstore in Paris! How could I not be excited to read Paris by the Book. This engaging story opens in Paris where Leah has moved with her two daughters in search of her missing husband Robert. The story moves between the present in Paris and the beginnings of Leah and Robert’s relationship in Milwaukee. Robert, a writer, often disappears ...
  • Kim McGee
    1970-01-01
    Leah and her two young daughters are distraught when Robert loving husband and father, goes missing. Assuming he is off writing even though he left no note and no clue to his whereabouts, they continue to feel his absence and his presence. Leah feels in her gut that Robert is ok and has left clues for them to find him - the biggest being plane tickets to Paris. She packs up the family and leaves Wisconsin for the unknown in Paris. Days turn into ...
  • M.G. Camacho
    1970-01-01
    I'm not exactly sure what possessed me to request a galley of this book. I'm guessing mainly because of the description and the fact that one of the characters is a writer and another, a bookseller. I have to say though that the author Liam Callanan writes beautiful prose that has a lyrical quality to it and it shows in this book. Unfortunately, for me at least, that is the only good point to this book. Though the prose has that beautiful, lyrica...
  • Terri
    1970-01-01
    Paris by the Book is the story of a woman who has lost her husband--or at least that's what everyone is saying, though she and her two daughters are not convinced. They go halfway around the world to Paris, work at a bookstore, and yet still feel that Robert is nearby, though they have no evidence to corroborate that. This is a book you have to have patience with. No matter how much you love the sense of mystery, no matter how much you may love t...