Lawn Boy by Jonathan Evison

Lawn Boy

“Jonathan Evison's voice is pure magic. In Lawn Boy, at once a vibrant coming-of-age novel and a sharp social commentary on class, Evison offers a painfully honest portrait of one young man's struggle to overcome the hand he's been dealt in life and reach for his dreams. It's a journey you won't want to miss, with an ending you won't forget.” —Kristin Hannah, author of The Nightingale For Mike Muñoz, a young Chicano living in Washington...


Details Lawn Boy

TitleLawn Boy
ISBN9781616202620
Author
Release DateApr 3rd, 2018
PublisherAlgonquin Books
GenreFiction, Contemporary, Young Adult, Coming Of Age, Adult
Rating

Reviews Lawn Boy

  • Bud Smith
    1970-01-01
    A working class comic novel that doesn't play tough and put on a show. This novel is loveable and true. Lawn Boy is a look at what it means to start from nothing and simply have the aim of getting some points on the board rather than stay at zero in the weird game of life. Mike Munoz, the narrator, as well as all the characters in the novel (mostly his family and friends), are nobodies striving for success, but their success is something like 'no...
  • Patty
    1970-01-01
    Another great novel from one of my favorites, Jonathan Evison. I've been fortunate to be hired as proofreader by Algonquin for a number of his books and I always look forward to the next one. This one will go back on my list to read again when the book comes out!
  • Aaron Cance
    1970-01-01
    Experience has taught me that the release of any new novel by Jonathan Evison is truly a cause for celebration, and this year’s Lawn Boy is no exception. His early opus, West of Here, aside, Evison’s books typically operate around a small constellation of vividly imagined characters, characters so artfully and intricately rendered, they remind you of someone you either know or are related to. Lawn Boy is no different in this respect, but is a...
  • Rachel Watkins
    1970-01-01
    What Jonathan Evison has done in LAWN BOY is give us an unlikely hero in Mike Muñoz, who tells it like it is and just wants a fair shake. Only twenty-two but already beaten down, Mike knows what it means to go hungry, to share a house with too many people, to never get ahead. LAWN BOY covers issues like racism, immigrant rights, and homophobia in the same breath as dating misadventures, Mike's fledgling topiary carving artistry, and the pretenti...
  • Kayla
    1970-01-01
    I'm surprised by how much I loved this book! A fictional story about a landscaper wouldn't normally be one I'd be inclined to pick up, but I loved the realistic characters and truth of this novel. Mike Muñoz comes from a complicated family-life, and he is constantly dealing with cultural discrimination, financial issues, and a difficult job market. He is trying to find the secret to living the American Dream as he landscapes for minimum wage, bu...
  • Billie
    1970-01-01
    It's the relationship that develops at the end that really struck the only false note for me. The relationship itself was actually sweet, but how it got there...just something about it didn't quite ring true. But that was just a single flaw in what is otherwise a small gem of a book.
  • Sarah Obsesses over Books & Cookies
    1970-01-01
    Thank you Netgalley for the chance to read this book. Mike Muniz is a guy who just can't get a break. He's young but already has had a lot of responsibility with helping his mom with money and his older brother has mental challenges. He's a landscaper who loses it one day when his crappy boss asks him to pick up dog shit when that is definitely not in his job description. So he tries other jobs and meets up with an old elementary school friend wh...
  • Robin
    1970-01-01
    In Lawn Boy Jonathan Evison has given his readers another character to care about and remember. The story offers up Mike Munoz' quick-witted first person narrative as he navigates his world - his family, friends, employment or lack thereof, and questions of identity and where he fits in that world. Evison deftly but gently offers trenchant observations on class structure, wealth, social anxieties and finding ones true self. (And for us librarian ...
  • Robin
    1970-01-01
    As usual, Evison develops his story with appealing characters and clever and hilarious banter. A fabulous "feel-good" story with Evison's love of libraries and librarians front and center.More thorough review to come.Thanks to the publisher for the advance reading copy.
  • Marie
    1970-01-01
    Mike is a landscaper, but his life is stuck in neutral. Will he ever be free to sculpt topiaries and write the great landscaping novel? With masterful style, Evison raises awareness under a cloak of humor. He touches on poverty, immigration, sexuality, and puppy mills, all to surprisingly hilarious effect. Laugh-out-loud funny, yet achingly real.
  • Gerard Villegas
    1970-01-01
    Looking at the title, I'm thinking to myself, "Didn't I watch this video online?" You know the one where the hunky Latin gardener gets all sweaty cutting grass and offers his very 'special package' deal to the equally hunky owner of the house. Then they bless the newly cut grass in a spray of natural bodily pesticides. Or there is that one time in bandcamp where some other blessed endowed landscaper gets it on with the big busted cougar owner of ...
  • Dianah
    1970-01-01
    Jonathan Evison gives us the feel-good book of the year with Lawn Boy. Twenty-two year old Mike's world is falling apart: his job is toast, he has no money, he can't get a girlfriend, he worries constantly about his overworked mother and his special needs brother. All he wants to do is sculpt his topiaries, read great novels, figure out how to survive, and maybe find some companionship. Falling into one strange job after another, Mike is flounder...
  • Kathleen Gray
    1970-01-01
    Mike Munoz is the kid we see on the street or at the mall or anywhere else and think nothing about but we should. This funny, insightful novel is about finding yourself when you're really just trying to stay afloat. Nothing in Mike's life has been or will be easy but he plugs along, consistently with a sense of sometimes sarcastic humor. Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC. I don't always enjoy coming of age stories but this one caught my attention.
  • Brock
    1970-01-01
    I think this is my favorite of Jon's books so far. I am buying copies to give to libraries when it comes out. I flat out loved it. I was having a shitty week, and the story made me laugh out loud. The jokes were slapstick to subtle, and I know how it pained him to be subtle. You really should read it. It will lift your spirits. It's a great story and a great read. The story pulled me in and I put everything else aside. The book is transformative.
  • Amy
    1970-01-01
    Best book I've read in quite a while. Loved every minute of it. could not put it down. I really cared about the characters and the book made me laugh at times. wonderful!!
  • Andrew
    1970-01-01
    This novel is bighearted, unpretentious, and thoughtful--just like its narrator Mike Munoz, a Chicano landscaper in his early twenties in suburban Washington state. Mike is barely holding on, financially and socially, but he's holding out for what he wants--a sense of purpose on his own terms. He may just be able to achieve it, with help from a motley collection of friends and family. By the end of the story, Mike is out to save the world, as his...
  • Andrew Campbell
    1970-01-01
    When a book loses me as many times as this one did, I suppose it's some kind of endorsement that I nevertheless finished it.For starters, it opens with an anecdote so similar to a famous Deep Thought (you know, the ones from SNL, by Jack Handey) that a conscientious editor shouldn't've let it off her desk without revision.Other gophers in the greenery:On page 248 of 310 the narrator describes himself as "field independent," a diagnosis which expl...
  • Rebecca
    1970-01-01
    Man, Mike just can't catch a break or get out of his own way until he stops giving a fuck and then the world takes on a different slant. Spoiler alert? I don't think it is needed, because this book is so much more then it's plot line. It is a coming of age story, tackles racial, social & sexual discrimination/prejudice, a love letter to literature and is funnier then hell. True to Evison's style this book is full of unsentimental empathy and univ...
  • Cynthia
    1970-01-01
    I really like this author, but this novel didn’t work for me. Disappointing but still worth a quick read.
  • Debbie
    1970-01-01
    I absolutely loved this book. I laughed so hard. I sped right through this highly enjoyable read."They moved Disneyland" was just one of the first things that had me laughing out loud.A tale of a California Mexican who lives in a trailer with his older brother (who has mental deficiencies) and his mother on an Indian reservation. If it weren't for bad luck, Michael would have none at all."We occupied space" another quote that had me cracking up.I...
  • Anne Egbert
    1970-01-01
    Mike Munoz, in his early 20s, has had a hardscrabble life. His Hispanic father abandoned the family leaving Mike, his older brother with severe special needs, and his mother to try to survive. They are currently living in Suquamash, a reservation town near Poulsbo, Washington. Mike notes you don't have to be native to live on the rez, just poor. His mom works double shifts as a waitress to support them while Mike works as a lawn boy, and is often...
  • Sharon
    1970-01-01
    Mike Munoz can’t catch any breaks it seems. “I’d like nothing more than to spread my proverbial wings and fly the f**k away from my current life, or maybe just get above it for a while.” His only job skill is lawn maintenance which he enjoys, and when he loses his job and can’t find another, he is plagued by one grinding indignity after another, and says, “After all, most of us are mowing someone else’s lawn, one way or another....f...
  • Cathy Outten
    1970-01-01
    Thanks to Netgalley for the early read.Lawn Boy was a funny, happy coming of age story. Mike Muñoz is a likeable but flawed human struggling his way through a life that will be familiar to too many people. Set in the North Pacific, Mike grew up and lives on a reservation (although not a member of the tribe). In this book Mike tells us his story as he finds himself, both in his personal and professional lives. Although coming of age stories are c...
  • Linda Quinn
    1970-01-01
    When I started reading Lawn Boy I thought I was reading a social commentary, showing the absolute divide between the haves and have-nots. This novel is actually about so much more. It's a funny, honest and at times heartbreaking coming of age story where Mike Munoz is on a quest to find himself: his sexual identity, his artistic self and trying to figure out what his life's calling is. I love his persona and his willingness to see the best in eve...
  • Kathy Shaw
    1970-01-01
    “Lawn Boy” by Jonathan Edison is the best book I’ve read so far this year. Mike Munoz is a young man stuck in a Cesspool of poverty and bad choices. He meanders through different jobs, never fitting in, never happy with his situation and somehow making the difficult even worse. The only place where he feels comfortable is the library, and so he spends much of his free time reading. The setting is Seattle where there is much lawn mowing to b...
  • Ann
    1970-01-01
    Great coming of age story as the main character, Mike, sorts through his options after losing a job as a lawn boy. He travels through jobs and relationships as he discovers who he is and whee he wants to go. The character development of both major and minor characters is so rich. Great book!
  • Taryn
    1970-01-01
    AH-MAZING!!! I LOVED this book!! I will defnitely get myself a finshed copy (I won an arc through Goodreads). So many great laughable moments and lessons to take to take to heart. I did a lot of noting and dog-earing. :o) I don't think you'll regret picking this one up so go buy it now!
  • Kalen
    1970-01-01
    Evison's writing is gorgeous, as always, but Mike made me so sad that it was hard for me to get momentum until the second half of the book.