Song of a Captive Bird by Jasmin Darznik

Song of a Captive Bird

A spellbinding debut novel about the trailblazing poet Forugh Farrokhzhad, who defied Iranian society to find her voice and her destiny“Remember the flight, for the bird is mortal.”—Forugh FarrokhzadAll through her childhood in Tehran, Forugh is told that Iranian daughters should be quiet and modest. She is taught only to obey, but she always finds ways to rebel—gossiping with her sister among the fragrant roses of her mother’s walled g...


Details Song of a Captive Bird

TitleSong of a Captive Bird
ISBN9780399182310
Author
Release DateFeb 13th, 2018
PublisherBallantine Books
LanguageEnglish
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Cultural, Iran, Poetry, Adult
Rating

Reviews Song of a Captive Bird

  • Fiona
    1970-01-01
    4.5 stars.Forugh Farrokhzad, known simply as Forugh, died in Iran 50 years ago aged 32. Her poetry was banned in Iran in 1979 and her grave is a place of pilgrimage still. At great personal cost, she broke down many barriers to pursue her art - cultural, social and structural. I had never heard of her and was attracted to the book mainly because I enjoy Middle Eastern writing. I don’t think I even realised that it was about a real person.Jasmin...
  • Nikki
    1970-01-01
    3.5 starsIn Song of a Captive Bird (a beautiful and perfect title), author Jasmin Darznik is the voice for Iranian poet, Forugh Farrokhzad. Forugh - an influential poet of the 20th century - was notorious for rebelling against cultural norms, especially in her work.Forugh's accomplishments come at the expense of her reputation and family life. In her thirty-two years she has been through so much pain; all she wanted was to be loved for who she wa...
  • Colleen
    1970-01-01
    4 StarsARC provided by Ballatine Books via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.This review contains minor spoilers concerning differences between known facts and fiction.Song of a Captive Bird caught my eye on Netgalley. I normally avoid fictionalized accounts of real people. It's a personal hangup, but it makes me uncomfortable when authors make such big presumptions about real people for the sake of fiction. But Song of a Captive Bird co...
  • Jill Dobbe
    1970-01-01
    An incredibly thoughtful, artistic, and well-documented book about the life of the famed Iranian poet, Farugh Farrokzad, by an Iranian-American author who still has roots in Iran. Farugh's poems live on today despite their banishment in Iran, and Farugh's notorious reputation. I could not put this book down from the minute I began reading it. I was enthralled with the story (some fiction, some non-fiction) and the author's honest writing, which g...
  • sylvie
    1970-01-01
    I'd like to thank Jasmin Darznik for her honest description of an Iran we do not often hear about, the Shah's modern Iran. It's restrictions, brutality.Forough Farrokhsad grew up in the Shah's Iran. One can only imagine the courage it took Forough to follow her calling, writing poems, poems that read like a story. Her courage to express herself as a woman, feelings we women experience along our lives.To understand her determination not to be sile...
  • Jamie
    1970-01-01
    This was a galley from Netgalley. Heartbreaking look into the life of poet Forough Farrokzad and life for her as an Iranian woman in the 50's and 60's. Good Read!
  • Guy Austin
    1970-01-01
    I recall in 1979 the first time I had heard of the country called Iran. From that first day I heard the words spoken, it would be many consecutive days that I would hear phrases that shaped my small understanding – The Hostage Crisis, The Shah of Iran, Ayatollah Khomeini. There were images that crossed the television screen – Young male college age students, blind folded Americans, large crowds gathered around the American Embassy. This was t...
  • Diane Perry
    1970-01-01
    I received this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Forugh Farrokzhad was a trailblazer way ahead of her time. She was a controversial poet in the sixties. She was defying all the rules in Iran. For that she paid a heavy price. This book sucked me in on the first sentence and I actually read it in a day. Powerful and relatable for today. Excellent writing!
  • Jennifer Lara
    1970-01-01
    Song of a Captive Bird by Jasmin Dapzink is a story inspired by the life and poetry of Forugh Farrokhzad. Born in 1935 to her father, a man she only knew as the Colonel and his wife, Turan, Forugh was a child who found pleasure in breaking the rules and even greater pleasure in the storytelling afterward. In the summer of 1950, she met her cousin and future husband, Parviz Shapour. He was a satirist who encouraged her to write poetry. They were m...
  • Nicole Harmon
    1970-01-01
    Book Review of Song of a Captive BirdAuthor: Jasmin DarznikPublisher: Ballantine BooksPublish Date: February 2018Book Blurb: “Besooz a bezaaz! Went the time-worn injunction to brides. Burn inwardly and accommodate.”I am a fan of history. Not just of history, I like but of history, I don’t like. My issue is I remember mostly what I like. But be that as it may, I have to say not knowing much of Iranian history I loved this novel. This is a st...
  • Maggie Holmes
    1970-01-01
    Song of a Captive Bird brings alive Forugh Farrokhzad, an Iranian poet and director, of amazing strength, genius, and humanity. Through the words of her verse, Forugh had shown her people the plight of women as second class citizens in Iran and shown the depth of their passion and understanding. Darznik uses fiction to tell Forugh’s story of love, divorce, motherhood, ambition, betrayal and fierce longing for freedom to be herself. This story r...
  • Zoe Mark
    1970-01-01
    Reading Song of a Captive Bird launched me into a world I knew nothing about, and beautifully educated me about it. One of my favorite lines is when Forugh defines art as something that connects people. It connects one human experience to another, and this is exactly what Jasmin Darznik did with her book. Through this book I understand so many things better, poetry, the literary process and what life was like as an Iranian women. Forugh redefined...
  • Jeremy Reppy
    1970-01-01
    This was a fascinating book. Although it is historical fiction, in that the author invented some of the characters and events and dialogue, many of the essential elements are based on what is known about the life and career of Forugh Farrokhzad, the first great (and very controversial) Iranian poetess of the 20th century. As I read the book, I looked up more information on Ms. Farrokhzad because I wanted to know what was true and what the author ...
  • Andrea
    1970-01-01
    I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.I thought I was going to love this book and I liked it a lot the first third; but as time went on — I just tired of it.This is a debut novel of historical fiction that begins in 1940s Iran. It is the story of the Iranian poetForugh Farrokzhad — a woman way ahead of her times.The book starts when Forugh is a child and ends with her death. However, there is an extremely intere...
  • Jennifer S
    1970-01-01
    I received this as a Goodreads giveaway.This is the part-fictionalized story of female Iranian poet Forugh Farrokhzad, who published in the 1950's and 1960's what was considered highly provocative/erotic poetry in an era when women were expected to submit to their fathers and then husbands. I was fascinated by her story of trying to pursue her own passions - including her writing, her love affairs, and her film-making - despite not only lack of s...
  • Kyra Johnson
    1970-01-01
    I read Jasmin Darznik’s eye-opening novel about the influential Iranian poet and film director, Forugh Farrokhzad. Darznik depicts pre-revolutionary Iran and captures the struggle of a determined Farrokhzad and her difficult path to fame. This is a heartbreaking tribute to the courageous poet who defied the oppression, traditions and prejudices of her time. She lived her life on her own terms and is an inspiration to young girls and women every...
  • Rachel Stansel
    1970-01-01
    Song of a Captive Bird is a nesut8ful novel based on the life of Iranian poet Forugh Farrokhzad. Based on research of her life as well as her poems, this was such an amazing story. I knew nothing about Forugh and little about Iran during the 50-60s. The life she lived was astonishing in its bravery despite the many hardships, brought on her both by the culture and her own choices. I enjoyed the excerpts of her poetry as well and plan to read more...
  • Rosann
    1970-01-01
    Jasmin Darznik's tale of an Iranian poet's journey is based on real-life poet Forugh Farrokhzad. It is a well written, well researched, gripping snapshot of the world in 1940's - 1960's Iran. The characters are explored with all of there faults and foibles. The time is vividly captured in language that gathers in and carries the reader along. The writer gives us a fascinating exploration of this feminist pioneer in all of her short life-- the goo...
  • Janet
    1970-01-01
    This book was well written but just not for me. I tried very hard to get to know Forugh and to care about her. But I didn’t especially find her likable until close to the end of the story. I thought she was selfish and self-serving. I understand that she came from a country that was very oppressive towards women. But Forugh had no respect for herself, her parents, her husband or even her son. No, not for me. Thank you to NetGalley and the publi...
  • Pumpkina
    1970-01-01
    From the moment I started reading this story I honestly couldn't put it down. This is a page-turner and a gorgeously written novel to boot. I was so moved by the story of this poet, an icon in Iran whose life and writing remind me in some ways of Sylvia Plath. This is for anyone wanting to fall into a richly imagined world while also learning about a fascinating time and period of history. I will be recommending this to many friends and also read...
  • Kaleena
    1970-01-01
    Initial Thoughts: Breathtaking and powerful, Song of a Captive Bird is an incredible piece of literature. The novel transports the reader to Iran in the 1940s and 1950s and offers a fictionalized account of the life of Forugh Farrokzhad, a woman who disregarded tradition and found her voice through poetry. I will post my full review closer to the publication date.Thank you Netgalley and the publisher, Ballantine Books, for the digital arc in exch...
  • Heather Persing
    1970-01-01
    ***I received this book from the publisher through Netgalley. All opinions and thoughts expressed are my own.***“Song of a Captive Bird” tells the story of Iranian poet Forugh Farrokhzad in this fictional book that’s inspired by Forugh’s real life letters, poems, films, and interviews. I found Forugh’s character captiving as she fought to become a poet in a time that often devalued women and their contributions to the culture. I also lo...
  • Lisa
    1970-01-01
    Review to be posted soon
  • Gail Nelson
    1970-01-01
    Very well written, interesting account of a young Iranian woman born way before her time...
  • Angela
    1970-01-01
    Beautiful book. I found it fascinating and hard to put down.
  • Joan
    1970-01-01
    I’d rate this a 3.8. A fascinating novel and portrait about the Iranian poet Forugh Farrokhzad. Personally I never heard of her before reading this novel but she was an interesting woman who lived during the Shah’s tumultuous and repressive regime. It was not easy for women in Iran but the protagonist was a trailblazer and shot through the norms. Her poetry was extremely provocative for the times and even more so from a woman. The struggles a...
  • Annette
    1970-01-01
    Even though the story is told by the main character, her life should be presented in action and not related in words. As a result the story is not an engaging [email protected]: Best Historical Fiction
  • Cynthia
    1970-01-01
    Forugh Farrokhzad, what an inspirational, motivational woman. One who wouldn't be imprisoned by tradition or misogyny. Extremely well written and captivating. thanks to netgalley!