Ivy Aberdeen's Letter to the World by Ashley Herring Blake

Ivy Aberdeen's Letter to the World

When a tornado rips through town, twelve-year-old Ivy Aberdeen's house is destroyed and her family of five is displaced. Ivy feels invisible and ignored in the aftermath of the storm--and what's worse, her notebook filled with secret drawings of girls holding hands has gone missing.Mysteriously, Ivy's drawings begin to reappear in her locker with notes from someone telling her to open up about her identity. Ivy thinks--and hopes--that this someon...


Details Ivy Aberdeen's Letter to the World

TitleIvy Aberdeen's Letter to the World
ISBN9780316515467
Author
Release DateMar 6th, 2018
PublisherLittle, Brown Books for Young Readers
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Lgbt, Contemporary
Rating

Reviews Ivy Aberdeen's Letter to the World

  • Lola Reviewer
    1970-01-01
    Ivy knew that wondering was what life was all about. Wondering was how you found yourself. This book is an explosion of emotions.3.5 stars. I did not expect to be reading a middle grade story. This is my fourth book from this author, and I was sure I knew her style and genre of choice by now, but this just shows that authors will try different things—sometimes it works for them, sometimes it doesn’t.Well I sure hope Ashley Herring Blake will...
  • Ava
    1970-01-01
    Ashley Herring Blake does it again. She's crafted another perfect book about family and love and loss, all centered around a 12 year old girl who's discovering her identity. Middle Grade isn't my favorite, but Ashley is an author whose work means so much to me, so I knew I had to read it. I'm so glad I did. This story is important and gorgeous and stunning and I highly, highly recommend it.
  • Jenn Bishop
    1970-01-01
    As the author of another book that could be described as "girl loses house to tornado," what I loved in reading this was seeing how differently another person can approach the same general concept. I absolutely LOVED the direction Ashley Herring Blake takes her book -- Ivy's journey of self-discovery felt so true to that age and the details of the tornado itself was so vivid and fully realized. I loved the mystery of who was leaving Ivy the notes...
  • Flor Méndez
    1970-01-01
    Hermoso por donde lo mires. Un middle grade LGBTQ+ sobre el audescubrimiento y la autoaceptación, además de que es F/F, lo cual no se ve mucho ni siquiera en el YA. Que podamos expresar quiénes somos a través del arte le da un plus. De lo mejor que leí en el año.
  • Janday
    1970-01-01
    This is a book about so many things, it has something for everybody. Homelessness in the aftermath of a natural disaster. Growing old enough for secrets and maturing attitudes towards family. The freezing isolation of the first hints of queer identity. Grasping at art and the idea that art education is an essential part of community health. The shifting boundaries of adolescent friendships. A girl who wants to ask another girl to the spring dance...
  • Lori
    1970-01-01
    This was amazing! Such a great story and so beautifully written. I hope this book will get into the hands of so many kids. And adults. Because it's a story that's relevant for all of us. Ivy is just trying to figure out who she is, how she fits in with her family, and how she relates to the world around her. So it's definitely one that's moving for everyone. But I'm especially excited that this book will be out there for young girls (and boys, to...
  • Zayda (Babybibliophile)
    1970-01-01
    I received an ARC of this book from Little Brown Young Readers. Here is my honest review!This story follows a girl named Ivy Aberdeen who is struggling to cage her feelings from her family and the world. Ivy's home is destroyed by a tornado and she misplaces her journal. Her journal contains a deep secret of Ivy's. There are drawings of girls holding hands in the same way a boy and girl would hold hands. Ivy is frightened with thoughts of being f...
  • Liz Lannutti
    1970-01-01
    A really touching story following a twelve year old girl just beginning to figure out her identity. Ivy Aberdeen’s home is destroyed in a tornado, her parents seem to have forgotten she exists, she can’t trust her sister anymore and everything sucks. Except the pretty girl at school who makes Ivy laugh when everything else in her life is so sad. This lovely story touches on a lot of themes for middle aged readers like balancing out independen...
  • Sarah
    1970-01-01
    Throughly impressed with this debut novel.Like many great books it begins on a dark and stormy night. Twelve-year-old Ivy Aberdeen's life changes dramatically when her home is completely destroyed in a tornado. Couple that with the usual challenges of impending adolescence and friendship. Attempting to sort out the confusion she feels about her attitude towards a new friend Ivy finds an outlet in her artwork for a school project focusing on resil...
  • Kari Duet
    1970-01-01
    ARC review.What can I say other than that this was a wonderful coming of age novel for a underrepresented demographic in most MG/YA novels. I managed to read it in just two days. I honestly couldn't put it down. For someone who experienced most of what Ivy went through emotionally during their tween and teen years, this novel really hit home. Hiding your secrets from the world is difficult to bear and Ivy's trauma of losing her beloved notebook w...
  • Casey Jo
    1970-01-01
    I love so much about this book - the way that Ivy's figuring out who she is, the way that her sexuality is intertwined into a larger story about recovery from a disaster, they representation of being a middle kid in times of crisis, how Ivy's issues reflect her older sisters', etc. And yet, something really gets in my craw, namely (view spoiler)[the straight girl gets a pass for fucking with her supposed best friend, and a one-line apology suppos...
  • Alisha Marie
    1970-01-01
    I didn't realize how scarce LGBTQ+ middle grade books were until I started searching them out and only came up with a few titles (none of which were in my town's library). So, I was super stoked to check out Ivy Aberdeen's Letter to the World. I had previously read Blake's How to Make a Wish and it became one of my favorite books ever. However, I have to say that Ivy Aberdeen's Letter to the World has surpassed it.Ivy Aberdeen's Letter to the Wor...
  • Nat
    1970-01-01
    This was a charming, wonderfully satisfying read. I like how the author captured big disasters and small ones, the biggest being a devastating tornado in rural Georgia, and the smaller disaster being figuring out who you really when you are in the seventh grade... and then the smallest (but most relatable) disaster of having your first crush. I mean, can you think of anything messier? Or more beautiful?
  • Jessi
    1970-01-01
    I have a lot of feelings right now.
  • Shelly
    1970-01-01
    This was definitely one of the more heartwrenching but also uplifting books that I've read. I definitely recommend this one. Full review to come!
  • Emily
    1970-01-01
    I LOVED this book. 4.5 stars. Middle grade teachers, get a copy of this one for your school and classroom libraries. The novel opens powerfully when a tornado levels Ivy's house. She and her family are displaced and end up (eventually) renting a room in a local B&B. It's tight quarters. Not only must their room accommodate Ivy, her older sister and her parents, they must also share space with Ivy's twin baby brothers.As Ivy's family deals with th...
  • Mariana Calderon
    1970-01-01
    This book completely blindsided me. I have a few different girls-loving-girls middle grade books on my radar for the next few months right now, and I picked this up expecting it to be pretty good - it was amazing. Blake perfectly depicts the simple confusing beauty of tween crushes and before I knew it, I was good crying all over this book. One thing I loved was that it's not assumed that just because there are openly gay people around Ivy, she w...
  • Yapha
    1970-01-01
    Ivy Aberdeen's entire world is turned upside down when a tornado rips through their small town and complete destroys the only home she's ever known. Truthfully though, things had started changing before that. She has started growing apart for her best friend, and she is incredibly angry at her older sister after overhearing a conversation. Plus her mother hasn't been the same since her twin baby brothers were born three months ago. Thankfully she...
  • Lindsey
    1970-01-01
    A beautiful, emotional, coming of age story. I cried at least three times. Ivy Aberdeen is hiding a secret. She let's that secret out in her art, but hides the art away. Then a tornado comes ... and suddenly her house is gone. Ivy no longer trusts her older sister, her parents are caught up with the newborn twins and dealing with insurance and day to day life without a house, and her secret has her distancing herself even from her best friend. Iv...
  • K.E.
    1970-01-01
    Make room on your bookshelf for this heartwarming treasure of a book. Ivy Aberdeen is a stellar protagonist whose passion for drawing is palpable on every page. I love how Blake weaves that passion into the way Ivy sees the world: bursting with color, every scene and person a possible subject. All the family dynamics feel textured and true-to-life. And then there is June, who is simply the best. She's fun and fearless and bursting with life—so ...
  • Bjipson
    1970-01-01
    This was the most compelling book I have read in a long time; I read it in one day, all 307 pages. The description of the tornado hitting Ivy's home was vivid and gave immediacy to the rest of the book. Not only does Ivy have to deal with the destruction of her family home and the turmoil that brings to her immediate family, but she also overhears a fight between her older sister and the sister's lesbian friend that makes Ivy think her sister is ...
  • Emily
    1970-01-01
    WONDERFUL. This is a book I wish I had when I was 13 years old. It is like a comfy gay hug. Not only is it about figuring out sexuality, it's about family dynamics. And man, if anyone else was middle child, you will get Ivy. But she's not an annoying middle child syndrome kid. Like you understand why she does the things she does. Ivy's relationships throughout the book provide a great example of what happens if you trap yourself within your own m...
  • R
    1970-01-01
    Ivy Aberdeen’s Letter to the World was a fascinating read. It covered many relevant topics such as homelessness, divorce, cancer, a fearful journey of coming to terms with one’s sexuality and the potential rejection by family/friends. This book should be in every library. It’s important to have stories like this to give middle graders hope and to understand that they are not alone. As an educator, I would have loved to have stories like th...
  • Alexis Jackson
    1970-01-01
    I loved this because Ivy’s story is absolutely necessary to the age group it’s designed for. It’s integral to shaping LGBT children’s literature moving forward.Her and her friends are colorful and realistic, and I’m sure readers will be able to identify with many, if not all of them. However, the incorporation of “blackmail”/notes to blackmailer just didn’t feel fresh to me. While the exposure of her notebook is a metaphor for her...
  • Shari
    1970-01-01
    What a sweet, tender and very well-written story! The tornado premise really pulled me in, but then Ivy and the other characters kept me reading, wanting to know how Ivy was going to deal with her feelings for girls--and one girl in particular--and if/how the world around her was going to support Ivy. I also love the artistic side of Ivy and how that plays into the plot and her character development as well. Highly recommended!
  • Sunny Ostrom
    1970-01-01
    This is the most I've cried from a book in a long time, and it was good, sympathetic cries. Though the writing could be a little flowery for me, it really did a wonderful job of capturing the struggle and making it accessible.
  • J Taft
    1970-01-01
    As a young kid trying to figure myself out as well, I could really feel for Ivy. It was such a nice narrative to see as well, it's not all too often you get to see this point of view unless you live it. A lot of this book made me cry - but entirely good tears. The book, in three words, gives me hope.