Whiskey When We're Dry by John Larison

Whiskey When We're Dry

In the spring of 1885, seventeen-year-old Jessilyn Harney finds herself orphaned and alone on her family's homestead. Desperate to fend off starvation and predatory neighbors, she cuts off her hair, binds her chest, saddles her beloved mare, and sets off across the mountains to find her outlaw brother Noah and bring him home. A talented sharpshooter herself, Jess's quest lands her in the employ of the territory's violent, capricious Governor, who...


Details Whiskey When We're Dry

TitleWhiskey When We're Dry
ISBN9780735220447
Author
Release DateAug 21st, 2018
PublisherViking
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Westerns, Adult
Rating

Reviews Whiskey When We're Dry

  • Liz
    1970-01-01
    I confess that I'm always wary of female protagonists being written by male authors (and vice versa,) but I found the characterization of Jess absolutely believable. I think a reason this is true is because, while there was quite a bit of focus on gender throughout the book, it was always more important who each character was as an individual, rather than as a gender stereotype.Very enjoyable and compelling read from beginning to end.
  • Judy
    1970-01-01
    John Larison has spun a tale of the Wild West that will keep the pages turning - and I don't usually enjoy westerns. This story is told from Jessilyn's point of view. Jessilyn's brother left after a fight with their father, and her father died soon after. She was alone on the family homestead which she worked the best she could. She finally left in search of her brother who had become an outlaw. She cut her hair and bound her chest so she would l...
  • Virginia
    1970-01-01
    A brilliant adventure story that redefines home and family. Set in the untamed West, the reader follows Jess, a girl who cleverly disguises herself as a man to travel dangerous territory to find her outlaw brother. On her journey, she discovers what extents she's willing to go in order to keep her identity and stay alive. The people she interacts with both help and hinder her. All the while you're rooting for Jess to survive just another day and ...
  • Portia
    1970-01-01
    I am doing the Book Riot 2018 Read Harder Challenge this year and one of the requirements was to read a western.  I am not a big western reader (I am incredibly squeamish and don't handle blood and violence very well) so I was daunted by this one.  That was, until our Penguin rep, Brian, came into the store and said, "I have a book I need you to read.  It's a Western."  I jumped on the opportunity.What I got was Whiskey When We're Dry, a we...
  • Jillian Doherty
    1970-01-01
    Loooved this book- more so I loved Jess; she was the most realistic female protagonist I’ve ever seen of the time ~ who you want to see portrayed in a Quintin Tarantino film right now. The gritty open America of the Wild West is perfectly illustrated, while the characters and their dialogue keep you glued to their stories. Jess’s journey develops in ways you can’t believe, sometimes in ways you empathize with or don’t like, while brutally...
  • Shannon A
    1970-01-01
    Left to tend to her father and family ranch, Jess takes on a dangerous journey in attempt to bring her brother home. On the trail, Jess discovers not only her true calling, but that home is where you are. A sweeping and breath-taking tale of the untamed west comes to life as Jess recounts her journey of the search for home and family on a harsh land. I simply loved this wild-west novel. -Great read to enjoy a dram of Whiskey and for fans of One T...
  • Courtney Judy
    1970-01-01
    I really really enjoyed this book, and I'm having a hard time pin pointing exactly why still. I think I still need to simmer on the whole book before I can put my review into words. The writing style could sometimes give me reason to pause, forcing me to re-read a sentence or two to confirm who was speaking, but overall I had no trouble imagining what I was reading like a movie in my head.
  • Lydia
    1970-01-01
    WOW. Jess is a heroine for the ages. This book is incredible - if you like historical fiction, stories of settling the West, and powerful coming-of-age tales, you won't be able to put this down. Family, friendship, loyalty, perseverance - a fantastic read.
  • amanda eve
    1970-01-01
    This book took me longer than I'd like to finish, in large part because the book moves rather slowly through the middle. This isn't to say that it's poorly paced: rather, Larison takes his time, quietly ratcheting tension and upping the stakes while managing to create a deeply evocative and emotional landscape. Gorgeous, brutal read.
  • Patricia Uttaro
    1970-01-01
    Just finished this gorgeous, heartbreaking book and am still trying to process it. All I can say is get your hands on a copy when it’s published in August. Reminiscent of the best coming of age westerns, this one blows them all away. It’s News of the World meets The Sisters Brothers meets McCabe & Mrs. Miller meets Butch Cassidy, with a little bit of Peace Like a River thrown in. One of the best of the year.
  • Douglas Fugate
    1970-01-01
    At first glance, this is a story of Jess, the lone young lady seeking a reunion with her brother Noah, who is now a wanted man/notorious outlaw. The first half of the story reminded me of Mattie Ross in True Grit; here is a young lady moving with determination towards a well-defined goal. Half way through the book I was about to throw it aside as a poor imitation. At this point, Jess joins up with Noah. The plot shifts, the action and the story t...
  • Cheryl
    1970-01-01
    While not always an easy book to read, this glimpse into the life of a woman disguised as a man so that she can 'disappear' as she travels across the western U.S. in search of her brother was fascinating. Hard to imagine that she could live in a bunkhouse side-by-side with gunslingers and cowboys and escape detection, but I suppose that is a perfect illustration of the fact that she could 'disappear'. We tend to romanticize the 'wild west', but t...
  • Kate
    1970-01-01
    I would like to give this book 3.5 stars because it kept my interest and had a lot going for it, but it felt like a somewhat juvenile YA title. The fact that I had that thought while reading took away from losing myself in the story.Jess is a strong, complex, and imperfect character who made this Western enjoyable and different. It wasn't always easy to suspend my disbelief with some of the political correctness and acceptance, considering the ti...
  • Lisa
    1970-01-01
    I loved this book! Jess is such a strong protagonist! Jessilyn’s mother died after giving birth to her so she was raised by her father and brother. As a teenager Jess’s brother leaves and her father dies leaving her all alone. Jess decides to leave her home and search for her brother. In order to travel alone she must cut her hair and dress as a man. She had been taught to shoot by her brother when she was young, so she becomes a sharpshooter...
  • Janette Mcmahon
    1970-01-01
    Strong women westerns are few and far between and well written ones even less. Larison captures the determination of his character in wonderful writing. If you enjoy beautiful description of the west, this novel should be on your list.
  • Cheryl
    1970-01-01
    First of all I like this writer. I will look for his other work. I thought the writing was a bit uneven. The female character was a bit of the a stereotype 2.5 Stars
  • Peter Albertelli
    1970-01-01
    4.5*
  • Kim McGee
    1970-01-01
    A wonderful coming-of-age western in the same vein as "True Grit". Jess is left alone at 17. Her dad dead and her brother gone, she leaves the ranch with the intention of finding Noah, an outlaw, and bringing him back. She dresses like a boy and tries to act tough, keeping to herself and avoiding too many questions but along the way she has trouble knowing who to trust and open herself too. Violent and written in a completely authentic voice, you...
  • Jason MARTIN
    1970-01-01
    An evangelical Robin Hood fairy tale set in the post Civil War Americana when it was difficult to separate the bad guys from the “good” guys and gals