Dopesick by Beth Macy

Dopesick

The only book to fully chart the devastating opioid crisis in America: An unforgettable portrait of the families and first responders on the front lines, from a New York Times bestselling author and journalist who has lived through it. In this masterful work, Beth Macy takes us into the epicenter of America's twenty-plus year struggle with opioid addiction. From distressed small communities in Central Appalachia to wealthy suburbs; from dispara...


Details Dopesick

TitleDopesick
ISBN9780316523172
Author
Release DateAug 7th, 2018
PublisherLittle, Brown and Company
GenreNonfiction, History, Politics, Health
Rating

Reviews Dopesick

  • Michelle
    1970-01-01
    In 2012, author and investigative social journalist, Beth Macy began writing about the worst drug (heroin) epidemic in world history. “Dopesick: Dealers, Doctors, and The Drug Company That Addicted America” began in the hills and valleys of Appalachia, the mid-western rust belt, rural Maine before rapidly spreading throughout the U.S. In 2016, 64,000 Americans perished from drug related causes and overdoses-- outnumbering the total of those k...
  • Ang
    1970-01-01
    This was ridiculously excellent. Macy is a fantastic writer, and she is so good at getting you to care about the people and issues in this book. I read Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic but didn't think it was particularly good, in terms of helping me understand WTF was going on with the opioid crisis. Macy's book is just SO. MUCH. BETTER. at that aspect of this, while including narrative and biography.(Abandon Hope All Ye Who...
  • Geoffrey
    1970-01-01
    (Note: I received an advanced electronic copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley.)Beth Macy has crafted a work that expertly utilizes both a grander narrative and the personal tragic tales of numerous figures and families, all to great effect to show how the ongoing epidemic came to be. This is a work that will tear out your heart before filling you with a ferocious fury. Fury at the shameless drug companies who targeted economically depressed co...
  • Stephanie
    1970-01-01
    If you want to know the backstory of America's opioid epidemic, look no further than Beth Macy's meticulously researched book. The personal vignettes bring a face to the stories we read about in the paper. I know many people will compare it to Hillbilly Elegy, which I learned a great deal from, but this book raised more questions for me. I think it would be a fantastic book club discussion. It points out a broken health care system that will cont...
  • lp
    1970-01-01
    An emotional, powerful, important must-read. This book wasn't trying to do what HILLBILLY ELEGY was trying to do, but it did it, anyway. It did a great job getting close to answering those big questions. I got a huge understanding of the cycle of addiction and struggle in Appalachia. Beth Macy writes with her heart and her skill. Both are enormous.
  • Paul
    1970-01-01
    From Roanoke to Maine to Humbolt County, the opioid crisis has swept across the United States with pundits on every side calling for action. Macy cuts through the debate with well-documented research that advocates for a combination of Medication-Assisted Treatment and a twelve step program. Word by word she builds a most striking argument for change. Even in the face of a lack of federal action and the complaints of nimbys, the author provides r...
  • Liz Bartek
    1970-01-01
    Great work by Macy, as always; truly heartbreaking, we're not doing enough to address this epidemic.
  • Betsy Holcombe degolian
    1970-01-01
    A fascinating look into the history and reality of the opioid epidemic. Macy did her research and compassionately tells the story of those touched and living in the throes of the epidemic.
  • Tfalcone
    1970-01-01
    Thank you Net Galley for the free ARC.I had barely started reading and I was immediatly getting fired up. First of all - the greed of drug companies, salespeople and doctors.Whatever happened to "First do no harm"? I never realized the amount of money that was at stake here. I also did not realize that doctors caved in so easily to drug reps. But then, really in the end the decision to take the drugs lies within each individual. On some level you...
  • Lissa
    1970-01-01
    4.5 stars. It's not often that you read a book that just feels so important and relevant to current society.  This follows the Opioid epidemic from the time that OxyContin was being aggressively hyped to doctors treating overworked mineworkers in Appalachia to the current time as Heroin is being used across class lines.  This is a frightening book and anger-inducing book but I think it is so important for as many people as possible to understan...
  • Jaime
    1970-01-01
    I could only read this book in short spurts - it’s densely packed with a ton of reportage and research, but Macy brings it to life with compassion and insight. Even if you think you know about the opioid epidemic, this book will tell you more. It should be required reading for everyone.
  • Betsy Kipnis
    1970-01-01
    I had to go slowly with this book because I wanted to process and organize the data buffering the narrative. Macy does a nice job of showing the geographic trajectory of the Opiod epidemic. She highlights the region, early dealers, underlings and fighters of what would become the rebirth of the next Hepatitis C and AIDS epidemic. She showed how Purdue pharmaceutical corporation made it easy for people to gain access in a medical and governmental ...
  • Robin
    1970-01-01
    Full disclosure: I received this book as the winner of the Goodreads Giveaway! Everyone needs to r ead this book! Drug overdose is the leading cause of death for Americans under age 50! Everyone is either an addict or knows someone who is. Beth Macy,s "Dopesick" is a well research account of the epidemic's roots in the Appalachia coalfields through the suburbs to finally leaving no one untouched by its sting. She documents the part that Purdue Ph...
  • Susan
    1970-01-01
    Calling Beth Macy a "great" writer is akin to saying that His Holiness the Dalai Lama is a "nice guy." This amazingly well-written book tackles the opioid crisis from all perspectives.
  • R.K. Cowles
    1970-01-01
    3 1/2 stars. A Goodreads giveaway. There has been plenty of books on these subjects. This one focus on certain incidents with much info from them. I liked this book but not as much as most of the other readers that has reviewed it.
  • Kim
    1970-01-01
    A very important book. Well reached and written, Macy has brought the story of our Opioid Crisis to the forefront and there are a lot of things to blame and very few ways to fix it.
  • Christine
    1970-01-01
    I received a free copy of this book from Goodreads Giveaways. Though exceptionally well-researched and very well written, this book is so hard to read. Watching the progression of how greed and inaction and corporate greed all combined to make and spread the opioid crisis is heartbreaking and astonishing. The stories of those affected, whether by their own addiction or by the recovery process or loss to overdose of a loved one, are reported truth...
  • Scott Paul
    1970-01-01
    Was honored to read a review copy. A haunting, timely narrative of how economic circumstances and pharma company greed conspired to poison large swaths of urban and rural America alike. Even if you think you know a lot about the opioid epidemic, this book will enhance your understanding of the toll this crisis has taken on families and communities. Beth Macy's prose always flows so well that you think you could be reading a classic novel, but eve...
  • margaret newkirk
    1970-01-01
    This is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand where the opioid disaster came from and how it got to where it is now. It shows how the public -- and the Virgnia and West Virginia public in particular -- were left to deal with the epidemic by themselves, as drug companies fought off accountabiliy for years. It shows how the public is still largely on its own as entrenched treatment models and interests compete with what actually might work...
  • MBP
    1970-01-01
    (4.5) A great book, but not surprisingly, a heartbreaker. Looks at the opioid epidemic from many angles: the culpability of Big Pharma; the socioeconomic conditions that made opiates attractive; the dogged work of doctors, counselors, law enforcement and parents to fight back; and the stories of the users. Well written & researched. Only drawback is that it's sometimes confusing to keep track of the many strands as they're dropped and interwoven....
  • Lauren Stewart
    1970-01-01
    *Received as a Goodreads Giveaway* Dopesick is a must read as it details the causes of the opiod epidemic, the current national emergency, and the best hopes for recovery. It focuses on Appalachia, and Western Virginia specifically. Macy spoke with doctors, pharmacists, addicts, family members, law enforcement personnel, and rescue workers over many years. Macy makes the opiod crisis heartbreakingly real and urgent.
  • Dree
    1970-01-01
    Thanks to NetGalley and Little, Brown, and Company for providing me with this galley in exchange for an honest review.—————This book is both fascinating and infuriating. Macy looks at the history of opium and its various iterations over the last 200+ years. She then traces the origins of Oxycodone, the drug that began the current opioid epidemic ravaging our country. She examines Purdue Pharma's marketing of the drug: claiming it was no...
  • Elizabeth Jamison
    1970-01-01
    You can count on any book by Beth Macy to be a master class in excellent research and reporting, while never losing sight of the most important element of any story - the people at its center. In this regard, Macy's Dopesick continues her streak of excellence while tackling the brutal topic of opioid addition and the insidious way that it is has invaded our nation's communities by using three Virginia communities as the book's heartbeat. The pers...
  • An
    1970-01-01
    According to the NIH, over 115 people in the United States die from opioid overdoses every day. That is a staggering number, especially when one considers how suddenly it started. Beth Macy traces the beginning of the opioid epidemic to the release of OxyContin by Purdue Pharma in the mid-1990s. Hailed as a medical breakthrough, OxyContin was designed to heal and relieve moderate to severe pain. However, it is also highly addictive and can serve ...
  • Kim
    1970-01-01
    Impeccable research provides insight to the opioid epidemic. Excellent.
  • Paul Greenberg
    1970-01-01
    Engrossing, readable, heart wrenching account of the opioid crisis in America. Highly recommended.