The Poison Squad by Deborah Blum

The Poison Squad

From Pulitzer Prize winner and New York Times -bestselling author Deborah Blum, the dramatic true story of how food was made safe in the United States and the heroes, led by the inimitable Dr. Harvey Washington Wiley, who fought for change By the end of nineteenth century, food was dangerous. Lethal, even. "Milk" might contain formaldehyde, most often used to embalm corpses. Decaying meat was preserved with both salicylic acid, a pha...


Details The Poison Squad

TitleThe Poison Squad
ISBN9781594205149
Author
Release DateSep 25th, 2018
PublisherPenguin Press
GenreNonfiction, Science, History, Food and Drink, Food, Food History
Rating

Reviews The Poison Squad

  • Brenda Ayala
    1970-01-01
    Dude.The Industrial Revolution, for all its major leaps toward with invention and innovation, definitely fucked over some people.Like a lot of people.The biggest take away from this nonfiction book is that given the opportunity, big business will screw us over tenfold unless someone holds them accountable. They put copper, lead, formaldehyde and so much more in our food. Kids died from drinking milk. That’s so mind boggling that I had to reread...
  • Jillian Doherty
    1970-01-01
    Page turning and solicitous! This incredible story widens the view of what we think we know about how our nation’s food. From flood shavings in the chowder, to exactly how much plaster makes sour milk looks just right again – this book is for anyone who loves reading about history that you can’t believe is true. Where the Food Explorer took us on a wild ride, discovering where our food came from – this wowzers of a history will make you s...
  • Virginia
    1970-01-01
    An intense historical narrative about the fight to regulate food in the US. Deborah Blum's book will shock and intrigue you as she goes through the life of Harvey Washington Wiley's whose research and strength pushed legislation to protect the current and next generation of Americans from terrible ingredients food companies added to make their food last longer or produce faster. You mouth will drop at her descriptions of formaldehyde being used i...
  • Erin
    1970-01-01
    Absolutely fascinating. I guess I should feel glad that the American political system has always been full of craven, venal blowhards. Frankly we’re all lucky to be alive, given this history of the pure food and drug act.
  • Jill Heather
    1970-01-01
    I do not think I love the balance in this -- I would have preferred more on the political or more on the science, but this felt unsatisfyingly short on both, somehow. Still a very fascinating book.
  • Margaret Myers
    1970-01-01
    You know how some things seem like such an entrenched part of our society that we’ve forgotten how they got there? Deborah Blum reveals the story of one those facets of America: food and drug law (did you ever stop to think what “unbleached” flour means, or why labels are so proud of this fact? Mystery solved thanks to this book). Blum details Dr. Harvey Washington Wiley’s decades long quest (1880s-1906) for food and drug regulation, agai...