29 Dates by Melissa de la Cruz

29 Dates

Jisu's traditional South Korean parents are concerned by what they see as her lack of attention to her schoolwork and her future. Working with Seoul's premiere matchmaker to find the right boyfriend is one step toward ensuring Jisu's success, and going on the recommended dates is Jisu's compromise to please her parents while finding space to figure out her own dreams. But when she flubs a test then skips out on a date to spend time with friends, ...


Details 29 Dates

Title29 Dates
Author
Release DateDec 18th, 2018
PublisherInkyard Press
GenreYoung Adult, Romance, Contemporary, Fiction
Rating

Reviews 29 Dates

  • Samantha (WLABB)
    1970-01-01
    Rating: 3.5 StarsJisu was devastated, when her parents shipped her off to San Francisco in hopes that she could perform better in an American school, but they may have given her the greatest gift, since her new environment did yield some stellar results.• Pro: Jisu was easy to like and root for. My heart broke, when her whole life was uprooted, but I admired the way she took it in stride, and also commended her on fulfilling her filial duties. ...
  • Olivia (The Candid Cover)
    1970-01-01
    I was intrigued when I first saw 29 Dates by Melissa de la Cruz since I don’t know much about Korean culture, and the story sounded super cute. It tells the story of a girl who goes on dates set up by a matchmaker, and I loved reading about each of her 29 dates. The main character is also enjoyable, and I would say that this is the perfect pick-me-up.Full Review on The Candid Cover
  • Cindy ✩☽ Savage Queen ♔
    1970-01-01
    Rating ~2.5Man I really wanted to love this book. Because I want to support books that have minorities in lead roles. But it just never clicked with me. Most of the book felt like a hollowed out K-drama with all the ridiculous family dynamics, but none of the heart. It often felt too rushed and too easy, rather than authentic. The book was a light, quick read, but it was very predictable. I wouldn’t say it’s a bad book, but it isn’t particu...
  • Safiya A. Mannan
    1970-01-01
    I have one question: why was it necessary for a non-Korean to write about a Korean and criticize Korean culture while she's at it? According to the author's note, the author is Filipino-American, learned about seons from a Korean friend, and dedicated this book to her Korean sister-in-law. The author states that seons typically take place during or post-college, but she says in the author's note, "as an author of fiction, I've taken some libertie...
  • Laura Altmann (laurabookish)
    1970-01-01
    29 Dates by Melissa de la Cruz is an adorable romantic comedy that's sure to elicit many giggles from its' readers. However, the book lacks the depth required to be truly memorable, and like many within its' genre, falls into the trap of silly twists and unlikely happenstance in its' second half.This book tells the story of Jisu, a talented photographer and student of one of South Korea's most elite high schools. While Jisu is happy to float her ...
  • Kristy Mauna
    1970-01-01
    I think Melissa de la Cruz is a fantastic author who has done wonderful things to bring more diverse books to teens.. But I'm not sure how I feel of her writing a Korean (not even Korean-American) MC with a detailed Korean background. I'm not Korean so I can't speak on how well of a representation this book was so I'm not going to. A lot of moments did feel a bit jarring for me as a reader, though. It was like watching a kdrama but without the he...
  • Blodeuedd Finland
    1970-01-01
    Jisu is about to start her last year of HS when her parents sent her to San Francisco. There she will focus on school, get great grades and get into a great College. I must say that school in Seoul sounds horrible, Jisu thinks so too. And at the same time she wants those good grades because that is what ger parents want. As for her parents, evil! They just said pack your bags, you are leaving tonight! But San Francisco is great for her. She gets ...
  • Barbara Senteney
    1970-01-01
    Ji-su is a 17 year old girl from Seoul Korea. She is about to begin her last year of high school, but her grades are not up to her parents standards. During the summer she has been ordered to go on Dates, arranged by a matchmaker hired by her parents. One night she decides to cancel a date and go to a club with friends to see a bunch of bands. When she comes home her parents break the news, she must go to America where she might excell in the lax...
  • Renee Taylor
    1970-01-01
    "I received this copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review"Jisu's traditional South Korean parents are concerned by what they see as her lack of attention to her schoolwork and her future. Working with Seoul's premiere matchmaker to find the right boyfriend is one step toward ensuring Jisu's success, and going on the recommended dates is Jisu's compromise to please her parents while finding space to figure out her own...
  • Sherry
    1970-01-01
    3.5 starsWhat I most enjoyed about this book is that it allowed me to learn more about Korean culture through the lens of the dating misadventures of a teenage girl.The 29 dates referred to in the title are seons, meetings set up by a matchmaker to see to introduce a couple with proper social backgrounds in hopes that they will hit it off. Jisu doesn’t really want to spend time looking for a potential boyfriend; she’s got enough on her plate ...