Suspicious Minds by Joel Gold

Suspicious Minds

What if you woke up with the alarming suspicion that you were being watched?One day in 2003, a patient unlike any other that Dr. Joel Gold had seen before was admitted to his unit at Bellevue Hospital. This man claimed he was being filmed constantly and that his life was being broadcast around the world like The Truman Show—the 1998 film depicting a man who is unknowingly living out his life as the star of a popular soap opera. Over the next fe...


Details Suspicious Minds

TitleSuspicious Minds
ISBN9781439181553
Author
Release DateJul 8th, 2014
PublisherFree Press
LanguageEnglish
GenreScience, Health, Mental Health, Mental Illness, Psychology, Medicine, Sociology
Rating

Reviews Suspicious Minds

  • Peter Mcloughlin
    1970-01-01
    Delusions of psychotics seem as random as they strike us as ridiculous. However the author as a clinical psychiatrist started noting patterns that would recur in the delusions of psychotics. One that he would see over and over again is a scenario that mimicked the plot the movie the Truman Show. Patients often thought reality was staged in some way around them and that they were being scrutinized by an audience. When this happened with several pa...
  • Lark Benobi
    1970-01-01
    What a disappointment. For some crazy reason I thought, given the title, that this was a book about "how culture shapes madness." I took the authors at their word and expected a reasoned discussion of how "madness" is defined from the culture surrounding a person and what is 'mad' in one culture is 'sane' in another. I've been thinking about this ever since I read "The Confessions of St. Patrick," in which Patrick reports the devil came and sat o...
  • Robert Miller
    1970-01-01
    The author essentially argues that social stress is an important aspect of mental disorders and that the current trend towards using neuroscience to the point of exclusivity from the social world is misplaced. The Gold brothers (mostly Joel, it appears) set forth a number of delusions and explain how various social interactions impact or cause certain disorders. The authors sprinkle in some actual case studies to further reinforce or explain how ...
  • Bert
    1970-01-01
    This is a remarkable book, something that you don't need to be a mental health professional to read and appreciate. There is a nice succinct history of psychiatry, refreshing the reader's recollection of how we got where we are today. Then the authors do a comprehensive analysis of how delusional thinking morphs into psychosis, including a healthy and objective debate on whether everything can be explained by neurons and genetics, or whether soci...
  • Jake
    1970-01-01
    I got a copy of this from a goodreads giveaway. The authors (brothers: a psychiatrist and a philosopher) begin by describing The Truman Show Delusion. This is where someone believes that they are the subject of a TV show and everyone else is in on it. They then outline the history of delusions, including possible evolutionary reasons that they exist. There are super-interesting case studies throughout. Wherever there are delusions, they are influ...
  • Ann
    1970-01-01
    An accessible, easy-to-read book about one of the most fascinating aspects of mental disorders - delusions.The authors start by describing a couple of cases of what they name "The Truman Show Delusion" , a feeling expressed by psychotic patients that their lives are a show, scripted by a not necessarily benevolent mastermind, and peopled by actors/impostors. They then take the reader on a quick and rather superficial history of the field of psych...
  • Anita
    1970-01-01
    Fascinating must-read for anyone interested in psychosis (and actually, a must-read for anyone interested in either belief or delusion). This book is an accessible mix of intellectual history, history of psychiatry, compassionate and sometimes-tragic anecdotes about patients, and philosophical explorations of the theories of cognition that were developed to try to explain a condition with substantial social ramifications that still remains a huge...
  • Paula
    1970-01-01
    This is a wonderful book. I am impressed with the good Doctors' knowledge, experience and humanity in discussing and explaining delusions and schizophrenia, a very difficult mental disorder to treat. I'm getting the book to read in print because it's worth reading again, in print, because it is so good. The book also does a great service in enlightening ordinary, everyday people about the tragedy of mental illness and how pervasive it can be. Men...
  • Margaret Sankey
    1970-01-01
    A student asked me who mentally ill people claimed to be before Napoleon. Although this is an exaggeration, delusions have followed along with technology, celebrity and perceived power that forms a veritable Q score of madness, from Cold War fixations on the KGB bugging you, romantic attachments to Elvis or George Clooney, beliefs in messages via microwaves and digital billboards, and the wave of people who, having seen the Truman Show movie, bel...
  • Uwe Hook
    1970-01-01
    Incredible insight into how modern culture influences mental health and paranoid delusions. Must read for amateurs and academics alike. The writing style is very accessible and the case histories are fascinating. It also doesn't take itself too seriously. If you're a fan of Oliver Sacks you'll definitely find this book interesting as well, and in many ways more satisfying as it digs deeper and reveals brand new insights into how the outer world c...
  • Cristiano Grigori
    1970-01-01
    Suspicious Minds was a very interesting book that gave me a new perspective on mania, paranoia, and delusions. I have suffered through my fair share of manic episodes, delusional rabbit holes, and Truman Show experiences. It is humbling to read that I am not the only person who has experienced this delusion/feeling and puts it all into perspective. A great book that I would recommend to anyone with an interest in psychology.
  • Michelle
    1970-01-01
    Having encountered a friend with a similar story to those therein, this book provided a thought provoking frame for what may be happening in his/her reality. Plenty of patient cases and anecdotal evidence. I enjoyed listening to the author read on CD.
  • Rose
    1970-01-01
    I was disappointed to find that it was not a study of delusions that are found only in various cultures.
  • Jetty
    1970-01-01
    Recomendado para cualquier lector interesado en el tema de los delirios y sus modelos explicativos. Yo lo incluiría para cursos de psicopatología.
  • Al Bità
    1970-01-01
    It is, perhaps, an inconvenient truth that we are fascinated and intrigued by stories (as opposed to personal experiences) of the maladies of others, particularly those of the mental kind. From this perspective, this book provides over a dozen case files scattered throughout, which are inherently interesting. They are presented as some examples of stories which might help elucidate the authors’ thesis that psychiatry should consider the possibi...
  • Heidi Ness
    1970-01-01
    I received this book as a part of the Goodreads Giveaway.I was excited to read this book as it presents an fascinating premise, but it didn't quite stick the landing for me. While presenting an interesting look at how we have viewed and treated mental illness in the past, the book struggles with condensing competing theories and drawing firm conclusions into why these illnesses occur. This is highlighted by structural and pacing issues that eithe...
  • Tom Boates
    1970-01-01
    I have been curious about the mentality of conspiracy theorists, and thought this book would help me better understand how average people get there, but for me it never quite got there. There was a lot of discussion about clinical schizophrenia and psychosis, with plenty of case studies that showed some signs of how "normal" people share traits with psychiatric patients, but I found the discussion of every day people's behavior lacking. Maybe thi...
  • Rayann Reid
    1970-01-01
    This book wasn't exactly what I was expecting, and I enjoyed that. It was about the various delusions experienced by people with mental illness, and how and why these delusions come about. It also had a lot of interesting case studies interspersed throughout the book.
  • Leni Krsová
    1970-01-01
    Honestly I expected a bit more but was over all satisfied with all the interesting information I got from this book. It's amazing how much can cultural phenomenons influence people's minds.
  • Sophia
    1970-01-01
    Suspicious Minds: How Culture Shapes Madness is an ambitious and fascinating work on the nature of delusions, which are defined by DSM-5 (the latest version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, the standard reference for classifying mental disorders) as “fixed beliefs that are not amenable to change in the light of conflicting evidence.” Brothers Joel and Ian Gold, a psychiatrist and a psychologist, respectively, introduce this topic thr...
  • Jeff
    1970-01-01
    Based on the subtitle of the book (and, if I recall, the blurbs on the dust jacket, though I always throw that away and thus don't have it handy), I was expecting a book more in line with my broad thought on the whole mental health thing (mainly, that the Mental Health Industries are largely just making shit up and unduly pathologizing every little deviation from "the norm") - something along the lines of "well, this is Madness in the West but no...
  • Borax
    1970-01-01
    This was an interesting book...took me a while to absorb it b/c it is pretty dry...but here are some things I will remember from it:- We are stronger as a group...but that group mentality requires us to leave ourselves vulnerable...we must trust- People take advantage of that vulnerability...this is mainly why we are suspicious- We have a two-tiered approach to suspicion...our instant reaction (ex: an emotional response when you are asked to walk...
  • GONZA
    1970-01-01
    The history of "madness" with particular attention to delusions. Everything starts from patients who develop the " Truman Show syndrome", id est those who believe that their life is not real, but part of a drama and then taken by the cameras 24 hours a 24, an interesting name for one of the infinite variations of paranoid psychosis. Through the stories, which sometimes seem surreal if they were not sad, the authors illustrate the various paths th...
  • Paul McNeil
    1970-01-01
    Pretty much everyone my age sat around with friends and, under the influence of The Truman Show and The Matrix, joked about what it would be like for our lives to be TV shows or how we could tell if we were in a massive simulation of some kind. Brain-tickling ideas, to be sure, but as this book shows, when they come into contact with a mind predisposed to madness, the results can be tragic for all involved. Joel and Ian Gold have written a two-pr...
  • Craig
    1970-01-01
    I'll start by saying this wasn't a book I instantly saw and coveted. Rather, it was a book suggested on the back of others I had combed through on Amazon. Regardless, I was quite looking forward to what I'd learn only to be left with a bad taste in my mouth for a reason I can't really put a finger on.First of all, the positives - like with other similar works, the best part of this book was the borderline clinical analysis of case studies. Howeve...
  • Sarah Novak
    1970-01-01
    I heard about the Truman Show delusion on a podcast, and I feared this book might be too narrow if that were it's sole focus. That fear was unfounded as "Suspicious Minds" uses that specific psychotic delusion as a starting and ending framework, but also discusses psychosis and theories of delusions more broadly. The authors present historical and modern theories of psychosis very carefully and weave in vignettes about patients to illustrate and ...
  • Sophia
    1970-01-01
    The best thing about this book was the collection of case histories. They were really interesting, as most delusions are.While there was nothing really bad, I found the author to be only a mediocre "thinker". He provided a fairly good outline about what delusions are, and what theories have been made to try and explain them. He did a really good job in pointing out the flaws in these theories, but he did only an ok job piecing together clues from...
  • Jay
    1970-01-01
    The Truman Show delusion: the belief that you are the subject of a TV show… that your whole life and all the people in it are paid actors who know that they are on a TV show. Everyone knows except you. That delusion is the start and center of this book. There’s a quick history of how medical science treated and thought about delusions, and then the authors’ theory about delusions being more closely aligned with social situations than most p...
  • Kayson Fakhar
    1970-01-01
    I liked those immersive case reports but to me, the suggested theory (despite plausibility) seems to be highly improbable.
  • Danielle Morency
    1970-01-01
    Dr. Gold makes a good case for popular culture and technological advances being the focus of delusions and mental illness. I am reminded of the fact that before War of the Worlds was aired over radio, people didn't have much of a thought of life outside Earth. Afterwards, though, the beliefs in abduction, alien experimentation, etc has sky-rocketed, leaving the supposition that previously people had other driving beliefs for their delusions. The ...