The Jemima Code by Toni Tipton-Martin

The Jemima Code

Women of African descent have contributed to America’s food culture for centuries, but their rich and varied involvement is still overshadowed by the demeaning stereotype of an illiterate “Aunt Jemima” who cooked mostly by natural instinct. To discover the true role of black women in the creation of American, and especially southern, cuisine, Toni Tipton-Martin has spent years amassing one of the world’s largest private collections of coo...


Details The Jemima Code

TitleThe Jemima Code
ISBN9780292745483
Author
Release DateSep 15th, 2015
PublisherUniversity of Texas Press
LanguageEnglish
GenreHistory, Food and Drink, Food, Cookbooks, Nonfiction, Cooking
Rating

Reviews The Jemima Code

  • Mackey
    2018-09-25
    There is more than one way to burn a book and there are plenty of people running around with matches.  ~Ray Bradbury, author of Fahrenheit 451blockquote>#BannedBookWeek continues at #Macsbooks as I take a look at The Jemima Code by Toni Tipton-Martin. While this book has not been "banned," the contents of the book have been questioned, hidden and lied about for centuries. As Bradbury states in the quote above, you don't have to literally ban or ...
  • Paul Falk
    2018-12-06
    Having eluded my attention over the years, the author revealed some startling news concerning the world of cooking. Getting to the heart of the matter, the art of African American cooking evolved from its early beginnings in the Deep South. Many slaves blessed with talented culinary skills provided outstanding meals for their owners. Back in the day, a preposterous notion was born out of a robust stereotypical black woman. Portrayed as happy-go-l...
  • Addy
    2015-03-19
    Background:Toni Tipton-Martin is an award-winning food and nutrition journalist. She grew up in sunny L.A., California and with the dispute her southern born relatives and their cooking, she herself could create soul food dishes. She admits this because of the negativity surrounding black women and the [soul] food they worked hard to create to feed their families (and their employer's families). Because southern food is often associated with Afri...
  • Meg
    2016-09-15
    While not a cookbook itself, The Jemima Code is an amazing resource which compiles the history of African American cookbooks from the 19th century to the present. I wasn't really sure how interesting a encyclopedia/resource type book would be, but it was fascinating to see what the cookbooks looked like and read how African Americans, specifically women, and the ingredients that they used shaped the food history of America. I initially thought th...
  • Read In Colour
    2015-10-31
    Would have liked more recipes. Instead it's more about who created the recipes & what cookbooks they published.
  • Kristine
    2016-06-22
    The Jemima Code: Two Centuries of African American Cookbooks by Toni Tipton-Martin is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in late June just after my boyfriend's birthday.After a couple of introductions from her colleagues about the offensive smarting sting of a racial stereotype like Aunt Jemima, Tipton-Martin sweeps in and talks about purchasing cookbooks, domestic service missives, and catering guides by African American authors, as well as the ...
  • Erin
    2015-11-29
    You would think cook books would be free of racial prejudice, but after reading The Jemima Code you see a long history of racial segregation that still exists in cook books today. Over hundred years of racial history told though cooks. The Jemima Code is great and highly recommend it.
  • Carolyn Fitzpatrick
    2015-09-18
    This is neither a cookbook nor a history book. It is more like an annotated bibliography, with really long entries. African American cookbooks published from the 1820s to the 1990s are described in great detail - how the book is organized, the kinds of recipes that are included, and any special features like illustrations. They are addressed chronologically and grouped into eras, each with a few pages of historical background at the beginning. Ve...
  • Andrea
    2018-11-28
    *sigh* This was the October 2018 selection for Nerd Night Out book club and, while we are all big fans of food history and foodways, I think we were all expecting something different. Most of us read some of this book but I don’t think any of us read it all. I, for one, started to lose interest as the cookbooks featured became more modern. Some of the older ones – I’d love to read sometime. Overall, my rating reflects what this book IS rath...
  • Janet
    2017-10-17
    From the publisher --- Women of African descent have contributed to America’s food culture for centuries, but their rich and varied involvement is still overshadowed by the demeaning stereotype of an illiterate “Aunt Jemima” who cooked mostly by natural instinct. To discover the true role of black women in the creation of American, and especially southern, cuisine, Toni Tipton-Martin has spent years amassing one of the world’s largest pri...
  • Denise Billings
    2017-03-30
    I'm not a great cook. In fact I don't even like to cook. I do like to eat. This collection of cookbooks is wonderfully historic. It tells the truth about who has been doing the cooking in this country for centuries. Painstakingly researched, with beautiful illustrations of the cookbooks and sample recipes that make your mouth water. Showing how we made do with what was available to becoming high end chefs. Sisters in the kitchen (and a few men) h...
  • Melise
    2018-08-07
    This was an interesting book, in a format I don’t think I have ever seen before. According to the publisher’s notes about the book, the author has one of the largest private collections of cookbooks by/about African American cooks, and this book is a compilation of reviews/descriptions of more than 150 of these cookbooks. The book is divided into chapters that are broken down by time periods. Each chapter begins with a short essay about the h...
  • Arielle
    2017-09-18
    2017 Reading Challenge - A book about foodI wanted to love this book. I think I also wanted more from this book than it offered. In reality, it is a very detailed annotated bibliography of African-American cookbooks with small prefaces to each section. It didn't feel like an analysis of the cookbooks. It didn't have a lot of materials that historically contextualized them. There was very little information on how they were received, if they were ...
  • SmartBitches
    2016-07-27
    Lightning review at Smart Bitches, Trashy BooksHistory buffs and foodies rejoice – The Jemima Code: Two Centuries of African American Cookbooks is an amazing resource. This book is not a cookbook, although it does reprint some recipes. Instead, this is an encyclopedia of about 150 cookbooks by Black authors. They are arranged chronologically, from The House Servant’s Directory (by Robert Roberts, 1827) to Jerk: Barbeque from Jamaica (by Helen...
  • Lara
    2016-07-18
    This is a fascinating book. The author collected and reviewed cookbooks by African American authors from the 19th century through the 20th, and provides information on books published more recently. The role of history, power, culture, trends all come into play as she illustrates how the cookbooks changed over time. The discovery/invention of Soul Food is addressed and it is sad how many books had to be self-published (nearly all). The author did...
  • Marian
    2017-11-04
    It was illuminating reading this book after reading "American Cake" and other cookbook histories. As others noted on Goodreads, this isn't a cookbook. It occasionally includes a photo of a sample page but that sample is not always a receipe. This book does provide a historic timeline from (a) early American cookbooks where recipes were attributed to the mistresses of the house, to (b) cookbooks of the the Jim Crow era when those mistresses admitt...
  • Critterbee❇
    2016-08-17
    An extremely engrossing and well-ordered compilation of cookbooks written by African Americans, and definitely worth a read. The earliest example, 'The House Servant's Directory' is from 1827, and is followed by a guide to 'Hotel Management.' Authors included are celebrity not-chefs like Mahalia Jackson and Pearl Bailey, as well as the legendary chef and restaurant superstar Leah Chase.I found Soul to Soul: A Soul Food Vegetarian Cookbook especia...
  • P.e. lolo
    2016-11-18
    My wife and I collect cookbooks so when I came across this book it looked very interesting to me, and I was not disappointed. The author takes you back in time with a look back at the history of the African American cookbook. Some from the 1800’s up to the early 2000’s. You get a personal look at the art work and how the cook books changed over the decades. You also get a look at the different types of food and language that was used in a dif...
  • Denice Langley
    2018-09-21
    WOW! the extensive research and planning the author devoted to this one of a kind cookbook and historical example of African American cooking has resulted in one of the most comprehensive cooking manuals I've ever seen or had the pleasure of reading. Toni Tipton-Martin has put together so many differing examples of cultural cooking that it is hard to believe their history started in the same place. The Jemima Code is NOT a tribute to Aunt Jemima,...
  • Christina
    2016-10-20
    I am extremely interested in the history of food and, if i'm honest, all foodways. I read the introduction quickly, enjoying the history of the author's subject. I bogged down when it came to the archive of historical cookbooks and the descriptions of each that are the bulk of the book. Like others have expressed, I am interested in the subject but would have liked more writing about the subject and less summaries of each cookbook. And more recip...
  • Den
    2017-11-18
    I am reviewing this book for Toni Tipton-Martin, University of Texas Press, and NetGalley who gave me a copy of their book for an honest review.I wasn’t sure if this would be for me. I’d read elsewhere it wasn’t exactly a cookbook but a collection of recipes and advice from the 19th century to modern day and this is precisely what it is BUT it gives you so much history and the sense of being there. It is fantastic. It makes me want to try o...
  • Sarah
    2018-04-26
    The Jemima Code presents an extremely useful investigation of the leading role that black women have played in the production and dissemination of American food cultures. The research involved in this project is astoundingly thorough and the compilation of cookbooks it extremely lively and readable. This book is one of those rare works that is beautiful enough to be a coffee table book, yet learned enough to serve as an academic textbook. I would...
  • Jennie Rosenblum
    2017-12-03
    I had the pleasure of seeing this author at the Texas Book Festival where she was moderating a session for another author. Out of curiousity I looked her up and found this book - am I glad I did. This is an extensive, detailed and historically accurate book of African American Cooks and Cookbooks. The many photos of cooks, cookbooks, receipes and articles were incredible. This is a history book more than a cookbook and I am very glad it is. As mu...
  • Patricia Reyes
    2017-12-06
    While not a cookbook itself, The Jemima Code is an amazing resource which compiles the history of African American cookbooks from the 19th century to the present. I wasn't really sure how interesting a encyclopedia/resource type book would be, but it was fascinating to see what the cookbooks looked like and read how African Americans, specifically women, and the ingredients that they used shaped the food history of America. I initially thought th...
  • Vanessa
    2017-09-04
    Shame its not a cook book. But, I found this book very interesting with lots of history of African American cookbooks from the 19th century to the present. There were a few old recipes which was reprints from old recipes book s of their past. This book is more of a encyclopaedia / resource type book about African American cookbooks. But I found this fascinating to see what the cookbooks looked like and read how African Americans, specifically wom...
  • roxi Net
    2016-06-21
    It's a fascinating history book of African American Cookbooks which is a great reminder of not just the issues we've had in US history, but also the charm of southern hospitality, the amazing food and almost a guide of food history. This book includes photos of old cookbooks, hotel management textbooks, old tips and tricks, and even the "House Servant's Directory". While there are a few recipes interspersed throughout the book, it really is a gre...
  • Julie (Jewls Book Blog)
    2017-03-15
    The Jemima Code is more of a resource book, and not an actual cookbook, that provides a chronological compilation of the history of African American cooking beginning in the 19th century to 2000's. Although the book wasn't what I was expecting, the sheer wealth of information the author dispensed was fascinating. The presentation was a little on the dry side, but the sections were spaced in such a way that I never felt overwhelmed while reading. ...
  • Larissa Lio
    2018-03-27
    great book giving a history on African American cooking in the United States from two centuries of cookbooks. There aren't a lot of recipes which i wish there were a few more but i really enjoyed that the focus is on the history of cuisine. Its a great resource book with research and analysis on deep and thoughtful look into African American cooking. Worth a read, it's not a casual read book, so keep yourself some time to read through.
  • Shaunda
    2017-01-23
    Many thanks to NetGalley, the University of Texas Press and Toni Tipton-Martin for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.I went in thinking that this book would have more recipes than it does. The history of cookbooks and their authors was interesting in places, but fell flat in others. Really liked seeing the old cookbooks from way back when.This would not be a keep in the kitchen book, but a nightstand stack book.