Care of the Soul by Thomas Moore

Care of the Soul

This "New York Times" bestseller (more than 200,000 hardcover copies sold) provides a path-breaking lifestyle handbook that shows how to add spirituality, depth, and meaning to modern-day life by nurturing the soul.


Details Care of the Soul

TitleCare of the Soul
ISBN9780060922245
Author
Release DateJan 26th, 1994
PublisherHarper Perennial
LanguageEnglish
GenreSpirituality, Psychology, Nonfiction, Self Help, Philosophy, Religion
Rating

Reviews Care of the Soul

  • Keriann
    1970-01-01
    The chapter "Gifts of Depression" is phenomenal. One cannot feel true happiness until they've felt true pain. Our society today is so focused on the quick-fix in order to 'feel' happy, that we don't allow people to go through the NORMAL ups and downs of life. It is NORMAL to hurt, and cry, and feel pain. By going through those emotions we are able to move on to greater happiness. I would not give up the pain in my life for anything in this world....
  • Candace Morris
    1970-01-01
    SECOND REVIEW, MARCH 2008:There will be many revisions of this review because I will probably have to read and re-read this book for my entire life just to fully absorb it.Freaking Thomas Moore. He grabs my soul where no other nonfiction spiritual author has managed. The other night, I craved some spiritual comfort (don’t' even talk to me about opening my bible right now! :), and his words jumped from the pages and balmed my broken soul. Let me...
  • Ganesh
    1970-01-01
    Many of the religions I've been exposed to preach reaching for an impossible ideal, and my attempts as transcendence have left me inevitably frustrated with myself, others, and my life. That is why I appreciate Thomas Moore's philosophy. Here is, in a nutshell: don't try to transcend your humanity, embrace it. Moore's ideas would resonate with spiritual wanderers and people who view life as an artistic work in progress. Here is what I took away f...
  • Hussam Elkhatib
    1970-01-01
    It takes the reader to great depths within the realm of their soul. There are no words that may describe what this great book can offer to someone in the midst of their suffering, as it provides healing that comes with a deep understanding. Such outlook could replenish contentment and restore warmth to someone's life with a reason. Thomas Moore had valuable information to share. He also contributed significant knowledge that enriches both the min...
  • Rachel
    1970-01-01
    Ok, the title sounds cheesy, but this is basically the best book of all time. It has absolutely informed my approach to my life, my friends', and my clinical work. Basically, Moore addresses what he terms our culture's overly "hygenic" approach to mental health - the idea that we need to clean up and get rid of undesirable parts of ourselves. Having been educated in theology, psychology, and musicology, Moore is in a good position to advocate for...
  • Leslie Reese
    1970-01-01
    Thanks to Rowena https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...--- who suggested we “buddy-read” bell hooks’ 1995 book Art On My Mind earlier this year, my love for that book was re-kindled. Like I told Zanna https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...--- who recently began reading Art On My Mind --- “this book is my jam.” In her essay “The Poetics of Soul: Art for Everyone” ---hooks takes to the pulpit to speak about the sanctity of the sou...
  • Kimber
    1970-01-01
    Care of the soul is much neglected by the individual in our society and this neglect effects personal happiness, how we view relationships, and our feeling of fulfillment. Soul is who we are and soul is the prescription we need for our sicknesses and disorders of mind. Moore, writing in 1992, definitely saw clearly the problems of the future: "One day I would like to make up my own DSM-III with a list of disorders I have seen in my practice. For ...
  • Lcbogota
    1970-01-01
    Although this book was presented to me as "not a self-help book," it really is. The most important point that this book made for me was the value of accepting contradictions, why we accept or reject certain behaviors/characteristics. All behaviors exist on a continuum, and the actions that we pursue change in response to our circumstances and maturity. These behaviors may be opposites and they would appear to contradict each other, but we draw on...
  • Diane Challenor
    1970-01-01
    This book if full of wisdom. I've abandoned it because it relies heavily on mythology for analogies and I have a personal dislike of mythology, therefore I had difficulty getting through the book. When authors use mythology within their prose, a knowledge of the myths is required. I have very little knowledge of the myths and have very little desire to learn more about them. AS Byatt referred to a lot of myths in her book "Possession" and I cross...
  • Miriam
    1970-01-01
    This is such an amazing book that really helped me shift my perspective of the healing journey. In one of many metaphors that stuck with me, he describes the soul journey as a following the path of a labyrinth rather than a climbing up a mountain, reaching a spiritual peak. There's a place for those spiritual ascents, too, but Moore always brings our attention back to our ordinary broken humanness--which is where we can find true nourishment. I w...
  • Miyuki
    1970-01-01
    Thomas and I had a great deal of conversations over 6 months. He introduced me to the Greek mythology, invited me to see differently the emotions I preferred to avoid, and encouraged me about imagination and mystery. What was once called hallucinations is now the soul of the world again, and this time, I am so happy to be Home.
  • Colleen
    1970-01-01
    This is the sort of book that I'll keep near my tissue box for the rest of my life, not because it made me cry. Rather, when I cry, I'll go for a tissue, see Thomas Moore's brilliant book, and feel better, hopefully. I'll give myself time to brood, time to weep, and time to allow my soul to grow. There's a chapter in here for nearly every modern major problem. I'll be memorizing the ones on jealousy and depression. Sex, relationships, love, caree...
  • Chelsea
    1970-01-01
    I was attracted to this book because of Thomas Moore's scholastic background in mythology, musicology and theology. It was a nourishing book, with little to no overtones of "churchiness". In fact it is a direct challenge to the traditional religious way of thinking about spirituality. He casts the obstacles of life in a soothing light, using the tales of Greek/Roman mythology and traditional shamanic dreamwork to add richness to our understanding...
  • Aryeh
    1970-01-01
    Admittedly, the first part of the book bored me. I went into this expecting a spiritual work and got psychology. However, in the 4th chapter when Moore really hit his stride the book began to take off. Although throughout the book, Moore uses Greek mythology to illustrate points, his Christian monastic background is evident in his understandings. Moore's writing throughout is thoughtful, eloquent, and inspiring. If you're reading it to help someo...
  • Sleasterling
    1970-01-01
    Care of the Soul addresses the problem that so many people today face: how to love one's self (yet also explaining the monumental difference between loving one's self and ego). I've never read a book that was as genuinely real as this one. Although referencing some Christian aspects, Moore remains religiously unbiased. Moore also frequently comments upon the difference between "care" and "cure." One must accept his or her human traits and appreci...
  • Kylie Sparks
    1970-01-01
    I read this book years ago but I frequently remember stories and examples from it. One of the major insights that I gained from Thomas Moore is that there is a value to depression/sadness and that the only way out of it is to really go into it. I feel that reading this book helped me to deal with many events that came afterwards in a much more present way. There's much more to be said about this book but I've have to re-read it first!
  • Carl R.
    1970-01-01
    Thomas Moore brings an impressive background and set of degrees to his psychiatric practice. He was a monk before he got into psychology, and he has a Ph.D and a number of other impressive certificates to his credit. He also plays the piano, he lets us know, as a way of relieving grief and anxiety in strenuous moments such as 9/11, which spurred him into a three-hour communion with Bach. Care of the Soul he envisions as a “Guide for cultivating...
  • Matthew
    1970-01-01
    I wasn’t prepared for his interpretation on myths and the souls that walk this earth today. The book started off well. It helped me ponder more of a shade of grey than simply black and white regarding good and evil. My perception of narcissism and depression have been on the side of evil. Moore treats it as an undeveloped side to your soul and a part that is screaming out for attention. I started to skim a little towards the end when he started...
  • Carla Rodrigues
    1970-01-01
    Leitura fantástica. De crescimento, de questionamento, a fazer repensar alguns dogmas.Daqueles que queremos sublinhar do início ao fim!"(...) uma verdadeira relação com a natureza tem de ser alimenmtada pelo passar do tempo com ela, observando-a e estando aberto aos seus ensinamentos. Qualquer relação verdadeira requer tempo, uma determinada vulnerabilidade e abertura para ser afectada e modificada."
  • Meghan Pinson
    1970-01-01
    Exactly what I needed to read to cross the bridge from self-help/psychology to the concepts I keep coming back to: the exploration of spirituality vs. soulfulness, of soulful work, of archetypal psychology, all of it. The very end doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me yet, but it probably will someday. I borrowed this book from the library and got halfway through before I knew I'd need it for real; picked up a used copy for $5 and plan to keep ...
  • Mommalibrarian
    1970-01-01
    I read Care of the Soul because it belonged to one of my daughters and she left it at my house. I almost quit multiple times and had large periods of time in which I did not touch it. Somewhere during one of these breaks I read Freud & Jung by Stevens also left by my daughter. F&J contains the barest outline of their thought. The section on Jung gave me some insight into what the COTS author was trying to explain. Couple of things - Soul is not t...
  • Vicky
    1970-01-01
    It took me some time to finish this book, but it was worth the effort. Here is an important book that teaches you how to accept the everyday life, to understand yourself and not be afraid to fail, to be sad, to be ordinary. To care for your soul is to appreciate the everyday moments, to feel the sadness and happiness in small things, to know how to be quiet, to contemplate. The author, who was brought up as a Roman catholic, has an education in t...
  • Helynne
    1970-01-01
    This is a short, but very wise and soothing read, just as one might imagine from the title. While providing a lot of suggestions for treating ourselves with gentlessness and respect to better our daily lives, Thomas Moore urges readers to remember that our souls are only partly on the earth, and partly in eternity, "We might remember the part the resides in eternity when we feel despair over the part that is in life" (96). An especially interesti...
  • culley
    1970-01-01
    "Care of the soul is not a project of self-improvement nor a way of being released from the troubles and pains of human existence. It is not at all concerned with living properly or with emotional health. … To the soul, memory is more important than planning, art more compelling than reason, and love more fulfilling than understanding. We know we are well on the way toward soul when we fell attachment to the world and the people around us and w...
  • Joyce
    1970-01-01
    I read this book twenty years ago at a time when I needed to understand something that was very difficult for me to accept. Often, it amazes me how books find their way into our hands exactly when we need them. The gist of this councilling book was the lesson of respecting every person's right to make choices for themselves even when those choices are hurtful and seemingly unacceptable to us. What is unacceptable? Nothing! It is what it is, only ...
  • Angella
    1970-01-01
    This book reminded me of the richness in life and that if I just slowed down to notice, I would be a happier person.Moore draws on Greek myths such as that of Echo and Narcissus and Tristan and Isolde to exemplify his ideas around Self-Love and Love. He has a poetic way of writing that while it may not agree with everyone (at times myself included), it did remind me that we all have our own ways of expression.The biggest take away I had was his t...
  • Dayna Reid
    1970-01-01
    This book relies heavily on mythology to make its points. I am not a big fan of mythology. I don't mind an analogy once in awhile to make a point, but long, drawn out stories used to make a point, tend to lose me. There is some good information in this book, for example ... "Strangely, perhaps jealousy itself contains the seeds of fulfillment of both sex and intimacy," talks about how allowing your soul to feel its inferiority and dependence with...
  • Nick Duretta
    1970-01-01
    This a wonderful antidote to a world where, in our quest for efficiency, growth and constant activity, we lose touch with that part of us that makes us alive--our soul. Although the term "soul" means different things to different people, Moore's multifaceted definition that encompasses mystery, uncertainty, wonder and beauty resonated very deeply within me. At several points I stopped and realized the myriad ways, in collusion with the daily worl...
  • Carola
    1970-01-01
    I almost gave this one four stars but then thought that might be a little stingy. Moore takes an opposite approach to life from someone like Tolle (Power of Now: New Earth), but in a way, you get the same result: a more peaceful existence. This author, who spent twelve years in a monastery before leaving the priesthood, sees the ego not as an enemy that is out to gain power, but as an integral part of us. He uses archetypes as a means of describi...