In Pursuit of Memory by Joseph Jebelli

In Pursuit of Memory

Alzheimer's is the great global epidemic of our time, affecting millions worldwide -- there are more than 5 million people diagnosed in the US alone. And as our population ages, scientists are working against the clock to find a cure.Neuroscientist Joseph Jebelli is among them. His beloved grandfather had Alzheimer's and now he's written the book he needed then -- a very human history of this frightening disease. But In Pursuit of Memory is also ...


Details In Pursuit of Memory

TitleIn Pursuit of Memory
ISBN9780316360791
Author
Release DateOct 31st, 2017
PublisherLittle, Brown and Company
LanguageEnglish
GenreNonfiction, Science, Health, Medical, Psychology, Biology, Neuroscience
Rating

Reviews In Pursuit of Memory

  • Rebecca
    1970-01-01
    (4.5) Debut author and neuroscientist Joseph Jebelli has a personal stake in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease: his beloved grandfather succumbed to it back in Iran in 2012. With the world’s population aging, it’s expected that by 2050 Alzheimer’s will be the second leading cause of death (after heart disease). What to do in the face of what Jebelli calls a “global and inescapable epidemic”? You might expect a book like this to be...
  • Paul
    1970-01-01
    When you think of diseases that kill people cancer and heart disease would most top peoples list, but with the population in the western world getting older, other illnesses are having an effect on mortality rates and people’s quality of life. One of the most significant is Alzheimer's and dementia, a cruel disease that leaves the shell of the person whilst stealing their personality, dignity and their memories. The first time that Joseph Jebel...
  • Amy Leigh
    1970-01-01
    Fantastic book full of history on the disease and things we can hope for, like a cure. Having a grandmother who had Dementia through my late teen years I wound up babysitting her and reminding her who I was all too often. Now I have a future mother in law with it and she is very stubborn. My fiancé says I have helped them both so much but I hate witnessing what they both go through.This book gives you ideas for situations you may be in and an id...
  • Natalie S
    1970-01-01
    We are currently staring down the barrel of an epidemic with respect to the aging disorders Alzheimer’s and dementia. Human beings are living longer and these diseases have increased to the point where it will soon be our leading cause of death, overtaking things like cancer and heart disease. There are claims that one in three of us will develop Alzheimer’s and that one in two people will care for someone with it. These claims are confirmati...
  • Darryl
    1970-01-01
    This excellent book by a young British neuroscientist explores the history of Alzheimer's disease, dating from its discovery by a German psychiatrist over a century ago, and examines the promising multifaceted research currently taking place in the UK and the rest of the world in order to provide treatments or cures for this dreaded and ever more prevalent disorder. Stories of people with Alzheimer's are also included, particularly the one involv...
  • Ben
    1970-01-01
    I received this book through GoodReads' "First Reads" in exchange for a review.Firstly, there is a very important topic for me. My great grandmother had Alzheimer's, as well as numerous others that I've gotten to know throughout my lifetime. One of the biggest things I often think about, and worry about, is the loss of my 'brain' in a working capacity, the memories, how to function, how to think, how to rationalize, philosophize, etc. Ever since ...
  • Nancy
    1970-01-01
    Lots of interesting and probably accurate information about the history of and research about Alzheimer's. One obvious error made this a 4 rather than 5 star book for me. (The author asserts that Kurt Vonnegut got the idea for Ice 9 in Cat's Cradle from Stanley Prusiner's discover and description of prions. Cat's Cradle was first published in 1963. Prusiner described and named prions in 1982.)My mother had dementia which was probably Alzheimer'...
  • Christina Dudley
    1970-01-01
    I found this book unputdownable, and I've read plenty of Alzheimer's and brain books. Jebelli writes engagingly and with sympathy, tracing the history of the disease's discovery, its certain and possible causes, and its possible avenues toward a cure. Although it's too late for my mother-in-law, it made me want alternately want to give her a blood transfusion from a young person, hit her with a round of cancer drugs, and prepare some curry dishes...
  • Sid
    1970-01-01
    Joseph J, the author, demonstrated an extremely thoroughly researched and easy to read style of writing. My favorite quote from the book, The idea is to die young as late as possible.The disease is caused by a gene mutation. Certain countries are less prone to Alzheimer's, incl. India, Iceland and Nigeria. Certain families and countries are more prone to the disease, Columbia. Nature "loads the gun," lifestyle can "pull the trigger."Certain lifes...
  • Kathy Heare Watts
    1970-01-01
    In pursuit of Memory: The Fight Against Alzheimer's is an in-depth look into study and research of this devastating disease with no cure. More and more, families have been affected by this diagnoses and loved ones learning about dementia and Alzheimer's. The book is broken down into five parts:1. Origins2. Research3. Prevention4. Experimentation5. DiscoveryI won a copy of this book during a Goodreads giveaway. I am under no obligation to leave a ...
  • Brittany
    1970-01-01
    Someone I love has Alzheimer's disease, and it is usually too painful for me to read books or watch movies about the condition.However, after hearing an interview about this book on Fresh Air, I found it and read it in a day and a half.I found it both overwhelmingly well-researched, it's obvious the author has credibility on the subject, but the balance of this with the interviews with patients and his own reflections were poignant and painful. V...
  • Deepa Krishnan
    1970-01-01
    A great book. I think it is important to know what’s happening in the world of Alzheimer’s research, given how rampant it is. This is a great sequel to the other book on Alzheimer’s that I had read earlier in the year which was about a proven way to combat Alzheimer’s. Thankfully the authors say the same thing - the disease can’t be cured with a single pill but continued research should give us all hope. Fantastic end to the end of the ...
  • Heidi
    1970-01-01
    A fascinating read about the research into Alzheimer's.
  • Danielle Gunkel
    1970-01-01
    Very interesting and engaging for a rather medically technical topic. Jebelli provides a deep summary of Alzheimer's - its history, disease progression, impact, and research - using the stories of real people.
  • Joodith
    1970-01-01
    Here's a frightening thought:“.....Globally, there's a new diagnosis every four seconds, and even that's a conservative estimate. In England,for example, it's thought that only 48 per cent of people with dementia receive a diagnosis. The remaining 52 percent may be people whose symptoms are mistaken for something else – like stress, the side effects of medication, normal ageing – or elderly people who live on their own.”I have a personal ...
  • Dan
    1970-01-01
    This is one of the best books on Alzheimer's disease that I have read. It combines interviews with Alzheimer's patients and their families with a comprehensive history of research on the disease from ancient times to 2016. I am a retired neurologist with early stage Alzheimer;s disease. I would strongly recommend this book to anyone interested in the disease but especially to those with Alzheimer's disease who are still able to read. From both of...
  • Payel Kundu
    1970-01-01
    I picked this book up because I’m starting some research projects on AD as part of my new job, and wanted a broad history of our understanding of the disease. The author travels widely to visit both researchers in AD, as well as patients and their family members affected by the disease. As such, the book alternates between discussion of the science of AD, and the experience of AD. The science portions cover both previous landmark breakthroughs ...
  • Ben Zimmerman
    1970-01-01
    In Pursuit of Memory takes us on a path connecting narratives of the history of Alzheimer's research, current research being conducted, and stories of personal interactions with the disease. I know a little bit about Alzheimer's disease, and I felt that the book did a pretty good job covering most of the big lines of current research. However, I felt that Jebelli didn't do a great job of bringing things together. Small areas of research, with new...
  • Pam Coon
    1970-01-01
    This is a history of Alzheimer's and a chronicle of the race to its cure. This book was shortlisted for the Royal society Science Book Prize of 2017. It's a worthwhile read chronicling the history and pursuit of a cure for what is considered now the great global epidemic of our time (the leading cause of death in Great Britain, and affecting 1/3 of our aging population). This is not a depressing read. It is an informative and fascinating book. Th...
  • Bonnie
    1970-01-01
    Jebelli does an excellent job of summarizing the history, the research, the physiology, etc. of that elusive disease called Alzheimer's. In the studies, Alzheimer's is not actually considered a disease but a process. Every brain ages, every brain shows some of the "components" believed to be associated with Alzheimers- dying brain cells, plaques, tangles. Why do some brains progress to dementia; others showing the same components do not.The brain...
  • Kerena
    1970-01-01
    I received a copy of 'In Pursuit of Memory' as part of a Goodreads giveaway in return for an honest review and I was not let down! The book is beautifully written. Although there is a lot of scientific knowledge and research that Jebelli has searched to the ends of the world to collect, he entwines a very personal and hopelessly sad journey of Alzheimer's within the pages of the novel. It was absolutely thrilling and captivating to read. It is a ...
  • Kerena
    1970-01-01
    I received a copy of 'In Pursuit of Memory' as part of a Goodreads giveaway in return for an honest review and I was not let down! The book is beautifully written. Although there is a lot of scientific knowledge and research that Jebelli has searched to the ends of the world to collect, he entwines a very personal and hopelessly sad journey of Alzheimer's within the pages of the novel. It was absolutely thrilling and captivating to read. It is a ...
  • Snoakes
    1970-01-01
    In this interesting and informative book Joseph Jebelli tells us the story of Alzheimer's. Starting with the history of the disease - how and when it was first described, he leads us through the history of its diagnosis and the discoveries of the different variants, research into genetics, prevention and potential treatments. Along the way he meets patients and their families, doctors and the scientists at the cutting edge of the research. Packed...
  • aaliyah Rafeeq
    1970-01-01
    I am going to be honest this is not a luxury read and far away from my usual fantasy genre but having had family members suffer with this disease i wanted to read this book!! Omg it was so interesting!!! To be honest i cannot remember all of the information but it really helped me to understand the illness and understanding the process around memory! Obviously it a slightly sad read as shows the absolute need for more research and statistics are ...
  • Nick Clark
    1970-01-01
    Nice idea, but poorly structured. Obtains the maximum of the three-star rating given the low word count. For a book of some 240 pages, 22 chapters with blank pages in between is a bit rich. There is so much more to be said about most topics. Yet key points are often briefly cited at which point the author moves on. E.g. the chapter on exercise is less than three full pages(!)In my view, Jebelli thus does not get the balance right between the spac...
  • Audrey
    1970-01-01
    This is a wide-ranging overview of the current state of Alzheimer's research, in lay terms. Jebelli's interest in the subject arose from his grandfather's battle with the disease, and the book incorporates many personal stories. I also enjoyed the stories behind the researchers making breakthroughs. Despite the huge toll Alzheimer's is taking on societies around the world (and, according to many, it will only get worse as populations age), Jebell...
  • Traci S
    1970-01-01
    I'm not saying anything that hasn't been said - this book does for Alzheimer's what Emperor of All Maladies did for cancer. This disease is unfortunately entirely too close to my heart, and at times I had to close this book due to emotion. But Jebelli does not leave us without hope, and that's why this gets 5 stars. He writes about scientific aspects that I have NO concept of in ways that make it as clear as a pie recipe. I hate that there is a n...
  • Rachel Blakeman
    1970-01-01
    What makes this book good in the first half is what makes it maddening in the second, that being that scientists don't really understand the mechanisms of the disease, thus they don't know how it can be treated or prevented. If you were hoping to learn something new about prevention, it's not in this book. There are some nice personal accounts and the book is easy to read but when I finished it, I didn't feel like I came away with much.
  • I Read, Therefore I Blog
    1970-01-01
    In this fascinating, frightening but always very human book, Jebelli tracks the history of Alzheimer’s from its discovery by Alois Alzheimer in 1906 to the research into how we think it operates in the brain, the link to genetics, the development of drugs to try and combat it, research on lifestyle changes to try and prevent or mitigate it and - most terrifyingly - research into whether it’s transmissible in an easy-to-follow and gripping rea...
  • Wayne Coltrane
    1970-01-01
    Before you go...I read this book because I'll be 65 soon and had a grandmother who was stricken with Alzeimer's. The author provides an excellent overview of the disease with his own personal account with a relative as well as others. The history, research, and prognosis provide adequate details without getting too deep in the weeds. There are plenty of footnotes and resources at the end of the book for further research. The book overall is very ...