The Indian World of George Washington by Colin G. Calloway

The Indian World of George Washington

George Washington dominates the narrative of the nation's birth, yet American history has largely forgotten what he knew: that the country's fate depended less on grand rhetorical statements of independence and self-governance than on land―Indian land. While other histories have overlooked the central importance of Indian power during the country's formative years, Colin G. Calloway here gives Native American leaders their due, revealing the re...


Details The Indian World of George Washington

TitleThe Indian World of George Washington
ISBN9780190652166
Author
Release DateApr 6th, 2018
PublisherOxford University Press
LanguageEnglish
GenreHistory, Nonfiction, North American Hi..., American History, Biography, Politics
Rating

Reviews The Indian World of George Washington

  • Matt
    1970-01-01
    “In the course of almost fifty years [George] Washington grew from a young man out of his depth in the cultural practices, foreign policies, and geopolitical strategies of Indian country to the most powerful man on the continent, whose policies and precedents affected the lives and futures of thousands of Indian people. He had spent his life grasping for Indian land, although he never called it that. He had fought alongside Indian allies, and h...
  • Bob H
    1970-01-01
    Even after all the books written about George Washington, this is an important new look at the first president, and focused on his dealings with the native peoples of the colonial American frontier. It's well-researched, with good and pertinent maps and illustrations, with clear prose and narrative, and it's not a flattering portrait. We find Washington, as a young man, begin as a land surveyor, and quickly become a speculator in frontier lands, ...
  • Terri
    1970-01-01
    George Washington's nickname was "Conotocaurius" (Town Destroyer/Burner) by the Iroquois Native Americans. Do yourself a favor and pick up a copy of this well-researched book of American history that was never taught to us in school. Eye opening explanation of George Washington, his family and how they "acquired" the lands that they desired.
  • Randall Wallace
    1970-01-01
    “Washington knew what the Indians knew: the war in the West was a war for Indian land”. “In Washington’s day, the government dealt with Indians as foreign nations rather than domestic subjects.” So, encroaching on the lands of others has been US foreign policy since day one (and even before). Natives accurately called George Washington “Conotocarious” which means “Town Destroyer” or “Devourer of Villages”. Washington even to...
  • Katie
    1970-01-01
    This book is pretty dense, which made it a little hard for me to retain specific information in it, but the overall story it tells and the way it recontextualizes George Washington's life is interesting and valuable.
  • Rama
    1970-01-01
    Formative years: President Washington’s efforts to reform the new nation on Native American land George Washington spent his life turning the Native American land for the new republic as well as his personal real estate. He believed that land acquired for a song would sell for a fortune. When European immigrants flooded the country, he owned extensive lands in what is now known as VA, WV, MD and PA. White immigrants settled in western territori...
  • Hannah Brislin
    1970-01-01
    As it attempted to be unbiased, this book really only presented the view of the winners or European imperials. For the full historical context of this time period and subject matter, this book would need to be paired with another book that provides the experience of Native Americans.
  • Marcia
    1970-01-01
    This book is amazing. If you have any interest in the early years of this country, the Native Americans, and our first president— read this book. I knew little about Washington as a person, only as I was taught about him in school. I also knew little about the Native American tribes and their leaders at that time. This book opened a window on what really happened in our country's early history and the role Washington and the Native Americans pl...
  • Ted Hunt
    1970-01-01
    I took a week long Gilder Lehrman class at my alma mater, Dartmouth College, in the summer of 2016, and it was taught by Colin Calloway, so I'm a bit partial to this book. I found that it really succeeded in meeting its goal of putting the world of the American Indians, most notably their interaction with the European colonists (and then American citizens), right at the center of the history of the nation in the last half of the eighteenth centur...
  • Kathleen
    1970-01-01
    This is not a book to be read in one sitting. However, it is a well-researched account accessible to the non-specialist. I was surprised how little I knew about the Indian policies articulated by Washington and their lasting affect. The book also describes Indians as actors, a real force to be reckoned with in the colonial period and the early years of nationhood.
  • Chris Chester
    1970-01-01
    “In the course of almost fifty years Washington grew from a young man out of his depth in the cultural practices, foreign policies, and geopolitical strategies of Indian country to the most powerful man on the continent, whose policies and precedents affected the lives and futures of thousands of Indian people. He had spent his life grasping for Indian land, although he never called it that. He had fought alongside Indian allies, and he had wag...
  • Bonnie_blu
    1970-01-01
    As Calloway ably relates in this extremely detailed work, George Washington had many admirable qualities and talents, and it's likely that we would have lost the Revolutionary War without him. However, he was also a man of his time and social position, which strongly influenced the evolution of his attitudes toward Native Americans. And while not an excuse for his actions, it does help us to understand why he did what he did (and didn't do).Washi...
  • Riet
    1970-01-01
    Geen 5 sterren, omdat ik het heen en weer gaan in de tijd af en toe nogal verwarrend vond. Maar los daarvan: een bijzonder knap geschreven boek. Het geeft een totaal nieuwe kijk op de persoon George Washington. Hij was beslist niet de halfgod, die de Amerikanen van hem maken. Daarnaast een heel goed beeld van de Indianen volken, die in die tijd in Amerika woonden. Niets primitiefs, het waren goed georganiseerde maatschappijen; alleen niet volgens...
  • Jer Wilcoxen
    1970-01-01
    Interesting topic, eye opening experience learning about some one we would deride if they were operating like this now, but hold in respect instead. style was repetitious and a little disorganized. but some fascinating information, a good look at the mindset of the players of the time and the culture they lived in, and very well researched.
  • Ron Burr
    1970-01-01
    Indian World of George Washington is extremely detailed in story telling but a very good account of Indian-European/American relations through the 18th century in trade, warfare, and especially real estate.
  • Gayla Bassham
    1970-01-01
    All things being equal, I probably admire the project more than the execution but this is still a really useful book if you are interested in the life and presidency of Washington.