Kings of the Yukon by Adam Weymouth

Kings of the Yukon

One man's thrilling and transporting journey by canoe across Alaska in search of the king salmonThe Yukon river is 2,000 miles long, the longest stretch of free-flowing river in the United States. In this riveting examination of one of the last wild places on earth, Adam Weymouth canoes along the river's length, from Canada's Yukon Territory, through Alaska, to the Bering Sea. The result is a book that shows how even the most remote wilderness is...


Details Kings of the Yukon

TitleKings of the Yukon
ISBN9780316396707
Author
Release DateMay 15th, 2018
PublisherLittle, Brown and Company
LanguageEnglish
GenreTravel, Nonfiction, Environment, Nature, Cultural, Canada, Autobiography, Memoir, Adventure
Rating

Reviews Kings of the Yukon

  • Diane S ☔
    1970-01-01
    King Salmon, tied to the culture of the people of the First nation, now making it's last stand in the Yukon. Everything one ever wanted to know about this king of salmon, the days when they thrived, and now their decline. The author sets out on a 2000 mile journey, mostly by canoe, down the Yukon River, starting in Canada and continuing on into Alaska. Along the way he stops, visits villages, talks to natives who have depended on the salmon, as a...
  • Candi
    1970-01-01
    4.5 stars"The life of a fish and a river, as I have learned, is astonishingly complex."This isn’t the type of book I imagined myself picking up. But then, I do enjoy an excellent travelogue. However, I was just the tiniest bit hesitant to read about salmon; and I knew that the plight of the King, as it is called in Alaska (or the Chinook in Canada), was going to play a major role here. Enjoying a piece of salmon grilled to perfection or biting ...
  • Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader
    1970-01-01
    5 King Salmon stars to Kings of the Yukon! 🐟 🐟 🐟 🐟 🐟 We traveled to Alaska and the Yukon Territory on our honeymoon, and I must say, I have never seen anything more majestic, pristinely beautiful, and untouched, as the Yukon, its waters, the land, the mountains. In Kings of the Yukon, Adam Weymouth weaves a tale of adventure, his own in fact, as he travels the Yukon River by canoe in order to study the migration patterns of the kin...
  • Jeanette
    1970-01-01
    King Salmon of North American and Pacific Ocean Chinook history and lifespan tale told inside out and back to front. And also front to back again- or with the fingerlings going back downstream tail first.Others have said it better and also more lyrically, it's good. It was an intense Alaskan read. I agree that there are more reality tv stars out of Alaska than anywhere else. And the differences of people and nature, are only a few of the reasons ...
  • Jenny (Reading Envy)
    1970-01-01
    I squeezed in another book for my year of reading Canada and Alaska (and this book travels to both since the Yukon River extends through Alaska and Western Canada.) I was expecting more of a travel narrative about the author's canoe trip(s) up and down the Yukon River in 2016 and 2017, but this is almost exclusively about the king/Chinook salmon. It reminded me a lot of another book entirely about fish that I read, never expecting I'd read anothe...
  • Elizabeth☮
    1970-01-01
    This book takes us on a journey up the Yukon River until it breaks into the ocean. Weymouth spent two seasons canoeing up the river. He speaks to native persons and locals and people in the fishing industry to gain a better understanding of what is happening to the biggest salmon in the river, the King. We get a good handle of the indigenous cultures and how the government has done wrong by them (no surprise there). We also get a better understan...
  • Paul
    1970-01-01
    There are very few areas left in the world that haven't had some interference from mankind, but one of the true wilderness areas left is in Alaska. It is through this part of Canada and America that the Yukon River snakes its way to the coast and it is this 2000 mile river that Adam Weymouth is intending to canoe along. Even this remote wilderness is showing the signs of climate change and the results of our ruining the planet.Weymouth is also th...
  • Mike
    1970-01-01
    I just won a giveaway for this book! Yay! I'm so excited to read this one. Sounds like it will be a book I'll really enjoy. Review coming ASAP!Update: just received my goodreads giveaway copy in the mail! Hopefully review coming soon.Well, I finally finished this book and can happily say that I loved it!a beautiful mixture of nature, adventure, history, natural science, sociology and politics. The author shows how all of these things are intertwi...
  • Janis
    1970-01-01
    Author Adam Weymouth paddled thousands of miles in a four-month journey down the Yukon River in an effort to puzzle out the status and patterns of the king salmon migration. Here, he offers a fascinating account of his experiences, of the life cycle and current state of these magnificent creatures, of the people who have historically fished for them, and of the agencies that study and manage them. This is a thoughtful and powerful book, one that ...
  • Paul
    1970-01-01
    The travelogue is a type of writing that attracts the fellow adventurer and the envious spectator. My hope is that this book will create awareness of this cause and commit both parties to action. Kings of the Yukon serves as a homage to the animals, the people, the land, and the journey. The paddle is the only way this story could have been written. Excellent job Mr. Weymouth.Thank you to NetGalley, Little, Brown, and Co., and Adam Weymouth for t...
  • Donna
    1970-01-01
    Visited Alaska and the Yukon last summer. To be able to read about the places that we visited was a delightful experience, able to remember the scenery and people who make their homes along the Yukon. If you are planning a trip, read the book as you travel, you won't regret it. Well written book.
  • Ryan
    1970-01-01
    Amazing descriptions of Alaskan/Yukon Territory landscapes, Native ways of life, Western-Native interactions, commercial fishing processes, and how all these things affect the life cycle and future viability of King salmon populations. In turn, effects on the salmon disturb traditional and modern ways of life throughout the Yukon watershed.
  • Vera
    1970-01-01
    This is such a beautiful read. Both travel writing and an exploration of the relationship between fish and man, oddly enough both aspects just as captivating. I was very fond of reading about all the people Adam meets on his trip, their habits, their ways and traditions - it's also a very sensual account, whereby you can almost smell the fish and feel the wind and taste the clear water. Just beautiful. There is the odd trail-off into imagined (or...
  • Sondra Brooks
    1970-01-01
    I mistakenly thought this was a memoir about a canoe ride up the Yukon. Since I love adventure stories, it seemed a perfect choice for me. Little did I know, I would learn more about King Salmon than I ever thought possible. I was pleasantly surprised, however, with the author's beautifully descriptive voice, and I felt I was right there with him in that canoe. His writing about the plight of the salmon could have stood alone as an interesting no...
  • Eleanor
    1970-01-01
    The Yukon River in Alaska is home to the king salmon, a fish that has been commercially hunted to the point of absolute peril and which also forms a large part of the religious and cultural life of the indigenous folk of both Alaska and Canada. (Adam Weymouth, in Kings of the Yukon, uses the words "Indian" and "Eskimo" to distinguish between ethnic groups which are not differentiated by catch-all terms like "First Nations" or "indigenous peoples"...
  • John Shedd
    1970-01-01
    Picked this up at the local library thinking it was just the story of an adventure trip across Alaska, with the "Kings" in the title meaning that maybe the subjects felt like they felt like kings during their experience. It turns out that "Kings" refers to king salmon, and the book is somewhat an informal study of the decline in their numbers in the Yukon River. It was still an interesting book regarding the writer's experiences along the way, es...
  • Buck Edwards
    1970-01-01
    'Kings of the Yukon' is not a book, it is a journey. The author, in a canoe, has set out to try and understand the decline in the king salmon population over the years in Canada and Alaska. Paddling from the source to the mouth, some 2000 miles, Adam Weymouth, a Londoner, meets an array of river characters and listens to both their tales of woe as well as their speculations. Though Weymouth, like many others, throws out those tedious numbers--15 ...
  • Bookish Chat
    1970-01-01
    I have to be very honest from the outset.  I'm not a huge non-fiction reader as a rule.  Neither am I a reader of travel books or books surrounding nature or the natural world.  Therefore when I saw The Kings Of The Yukon on the shortlist I was very apprehensive.This is an account of Adam Weymouth's journey along the Yukon river in Alaska, largely alone in a canoe.  This is also an account of how the King Salmon (or Chinook as they are known)...
  • Stephen Richardson
    1970-01-01
    Only seems appropriate as I'll be canoeing 200+ miles down the Yukon this summer.Slightly disappointing. Don't worry Jack London, Pierre Berton, or Robert Service you're in no danger.
  • Kathleen
    1970-01-01
    Kings of the Yukon is a nonfiction book that defies classification. It serves several purposes: it chronicles the author's trip traversing the Yukon; follows the salmon's journey with stops along the way at places that count or propigate them as well as places where people catch them or factories process them; tells of the history of the salmon and the folk who depend on them for food and livelihood; and looks at the science and folk wisdom surro...
  • Steve
    1970-01-01
    I learned about this book from a review in The Wall Street Journal. The author, Adam Weymouth, paddles from the Canadian headwaters of the Yukon to its Alaska terminus at the Bering Sea. In this homage to the King Salmon, Weymouth tracks the salmons’ return to their birthplace, but in reverse. He paddles down the river. The salmon swim upstream (at first) to procreate. The offspring swim downstream with the river. In each direction, the salmon ...
  • Christine
    1970-01-01
    I got to this book via the Penguin "Read The Year" list and I was really sceptical about this one because it is not a book I would have picked up in a bookstore usually (Fish? Alaska? WTF?). But that's the point of a reading list: discovering new books. So what can I say? I enjoyed it a lot. It is not just a story about salmon it is more a documentary on how nature and men are interwoven and what happens when humans intervene in a highly effectiv...
  • Literary Soirée
    1970-01-01
    I was enthralled by the grand adventure described in “Kings of the Yukon: One Summer Paddling Across the Far North.” Solo adventurer Adam Weymouth thrills us with his poetic narrative of journeying by canoe across Alaska along the entire 2,000-mile Yukon river, where he follows the migration of king salmon over a four-month period.The author also reveals the connection of people and fish through moving portraits of the individuals he encounte...
  • Peter Kralka
    1970-01-01
    An interesting narrative of life on the Yukon River told by someone who paddled its entire length in a canoe. Vivid descriptions of the ever changing landscape, visits and discussions with the peoples who live on the river banks and their ways of life. The peoples lives historically revolved around the Chinook or King salmon and greed by both national and foreign companies have decimated the salmon populations which in turn greatly affected the p...
  • Ann
    1970-01-01
    What an enjoyable story that gives insight into the wild Yukon River, the salmon who head back to spawn and the people who depend on both the river and the fish. Mr. Weymouth travels the length of the Yukon on a 4 month journey where he catalogs what he finds with climate change, fish habitat and environmental pollution and how it affects man and wildlife. The history of the fishing industry and the native population along the river is fascinatin...
  • Bart
    1970-01-01
    Adam Weymouth recounts a 2000-mile canoe trip, from the upstream end of the Yukon River’s tributaries to its sprawling delta on Alaska’s Bering Sea coast. As a travel tale the book is first-rate. But Weymouth’s keen interest in the Chinook – aka King – Salmon, and his listening skills when he meets dozens of river-dwellers whose cultures have been shaped by the migrations of this fish, combine to fascinating, awe-inspiring, and often he...
  • Lizzi
    1970-01-01
    Loved this! Read for the Young Writer of the Year Award Shadow Panel 2018. Blog review here: https://theselittlewords.com/2018/11/...
  • Robin
    1970-01-01
    I loved this true, outdoor adventure padeling 2,000 miles on the Yukon in a canoe. This was passionate mission to follow the King salmon while along the way taking on the topics of ecology, conservation, the culture of Native (and transplanted) Alaskans and their relationship to this mighty fish. The descriptions of the journey and the terrain left me aching to go there and eat some salmon.
  • Lynne
    1970-01-01
    I learned a lot about salmon! Cool that they have an osmotic change when going from fresh to salt and back. Was expecting more of a man against nature story of a river trip. Guess you could say it is a nature against man story. Good writing. Recommend it for anyone with an interest in wildlife ecology or traveling in Alaska.
  • Sean Farrell
    1970-01-01
    Really wanted to give it 4 stars, but there were too many passages that were just a bit dull. I enjoyed the journey and the writing was good but in some ways it should have been longer. There was much switching between perspectives (indigenous, commercial) without proper context and the various 'conflicts' became confusing as a result.