Lost Empress by Sergio de la Pava

Lost Empress

From the author of the acclaimed, PEN/Bingham Prize-winning A Naked Singularity; a shockingly hilarious novel that tackles, with equal aplomb, both America's most popular sport and its criminal justice system.From Paterson, New Jersey to Rikers Island to the streets of New York City, Sergio De La Pava's Lost Empress introduces readers to a cast of characters unlike any other in modern fiction: dreamers and exiles, immigrants and night-shift worke...


Details Lost Empress

TitleLost Empress
ISBN9781524747220
Author
Release DateMay 8th, 2018
PublisherPantheon Books
GenreFiction, Sports and Games, Sports, Abandoned, Novels
Rating

Reviews Lost Empress

  • SueKich
    1970-01-01
    Sergio de la Pava overplays his hand.It seems to me that Sergio de la Pava’s extraordinary novel, A Naked Singularity, was just that – a singularity. Here, with Lost Empress, I’m sure he set out with the best intentions to create something even more spectacular. But instead he ends up, in my view, with a misjudged and highly self-indulgent melee. On the plus side, Lost Empress has some inventive characters, most notably Nina Gill, the strik...
  • Michael
    1970-01-01
    If Thomas Pynchon, now 81, never pens another novel I’ll be sad, grateful for his epic novels like GRAVITY’S RAINBOW and AGAINST THE DAY, but content we still have Sergio de la Pava hanging around writing novels like A NAKED SINGULARITY and his latest LOST EMPRESS. While he’s no Pynchon, who is? de la Pava is certainly standing precariously on Pynchon’s shoulders. De la Pava is of the same, to put a label on it, Postmodernist tribe as Pyn...
  • Mark
    1970-01-01
    Frustrating book. The winding of characters and even the bones of the story are good, but too many sitcom dialogues, lectures, and eye-rolling shortcuts on development of story and of character. Audible book performances were pretty good but I’m too lazy to enter that edition in here myself.
  • Gianna
    1970-01-01
    Nina Gill, daughter of the owner of the Dallas Cowboys has benn put aside. Her brother has inherited the team, even though she is the real great mind that has moved the team forward. But Nina hasn't told her last word yet. Having inherited an IFL team instead, she is determined to put the IFL on the map; and take her revenge in the process.Nuno DeAngeles is preparing himself for one of the most ambitious crimes that have ever been committed. And,...
  • Jonathan Hiskes
    1970-01-01
    A brilliant, funny, crude, violent, wildly inventive ensemble novel featuring an oligarch NFL owner, a Rikers inmate, a 911 dispatcher, an EMT, art thieves, a genius parking-garage attendant, and--my favorite character--a sandwich deliverywoman turned fake lawyer turned into deputy commissioner of a semi-pro football league. This massive story is impossible to summarize. It's also the best case I've read in ages for the continuing social relevanc...
  • Chris Via
    1970-01-01
    Bravo!
  • Mike
    1970-01-01
    I read the authors “A Naked Singularity” years ago and absolutely loved it. This however, was a gawd damn freaking slog to finish. Left me shaking my head that I kept thinking it would get better. What an idiot I was. Reading this book is like watching a television show that keeps getting interrupted for absurd news bulletins or car chases. The author leaves the main storyline and constantly takes off on riffs about damn near everything imagi...
  • Richard Noggle
    1970-01-01
    (Maybe minor spoilers)I'd say that slightly more than half of de la Pava's wildly uneven postmodern romp works pretty well, and that it gets stronger in its second half, with at least some resolution to its many spiraling plotlines. Negatives: The screwball comic elements are a mixed bag for me along with some of the novel's skimmable metaphysical rambling. Some of the "collage" elements could be omitted entirely (especially the long prison ruleb...
  • Dax
    1970-01-01
    Pava likes to deal in the absurd, and it works well for "Lost Empress." This is a novel that focuses on the underclass with a close examination of the justice system. The actual story line is entertaining and there is an abundance of memorable characters, but what makes this novel stand out are the long extrapolations that seem to spring out of nowhere in almost every chapter. A lot of readers will find these tangents too tedious, but it provides...
  • Danny Caine
    1970-01-01
    Lost Empress by Sergio de la Pava is a novel so intellectually restless, so stuffed with ideas, that summary is futile. I’ll try anyway. The aging owner of the Dallas Cowboys is dividing his estate between his two children, and his daughter Nina gets the football team: the Paterson Pork of the Indoor Football Leauge, that is. Meanwhile, Nuno DeAngeles sits in a cell in Rikers Island plotting a truly outrageous crime. As Nuno plots his move, and...
  • Larry Ggggggggggggggggggggggggg
    1970-01-01
    Read this book,! Parts I liked were the chapter about Sylvester scarpetti anything with nuno, nelson de Cervantes, feniz, uh nina and dia and the joni Mitchell stuff just basically a real cool book lots of laughs and thrills yall
  • MGF
    1970-01-01
    Loved this book. An awesome amalgamation of social commentary, humor, law, mystery, relationships, and football. Yes, it is a bit strange at times, but it’s just so well-written and compelling. Hope there is a sequel!
  • Barry
    1970-01-01
    It's not obvious that I would enjoy a book based on football, American or otherwise, but this is truly something special. The true scope of the narrative is breath-taking, but what really shone was some of the dialogue, showing deep humour despite the grandiosity.
  • Chuck Bunting
    1970-01-01
    It's a tough read but in a good way.
  • Steve Hench
    1970-01-01
    Somewhat entertaining plot and connecting storylines. But with the exception of perhaps several keen observations, far too many intellectual asides and ramblings. And instead of supplementing the story in any particularly meaningful way, these just felt jarring, contrived, and unnecessary.
  • Tim
    1970-01-01
    DFW, Jr. right here
  • Michael Sedor
    1970-01-01
    Too. Too many words, characters, ambitions, subplots, ideas, digressions, infinitejestisms.
  • Steve
    1970-01-01
    Loved it. It's weird, sprawling, hilarious, moving and sometimes thrilling, especially in the final chapters. It's a big rush of a book that mash-ups metaphysics, deep musings about time and past, present and future, Joni Mitchell obsession, Salvador Dali, the American justice system, rich and poor, death, prison escapes, and football -- both NFL and the indoor kind. Huge cast of memorable characters and instantly re-read worthy dialogue. It's li...
  • Michael Smith
    1970-01-01
    This is just a ridiculously ambitious book that tackles just about every topic, from the horror of the NFL to the cruelties of our justice system. Though still desperately in need of an editor, De La Pava is a hell of a writer.
  • Shelley Ettinger
    1970-01-01
    As I rounded the three-quarters mark and forced myself forward to the finish I thought of many things to say about this novel, pro and con, but honestly now, having finished, I'm too wearied to give it the many-paragraphed thoughtful consideration it deserves, and when I say deserves I mean because a work by the author of A Naked Singularity merits serious consideration. That was an extraordinary book. While flawed, it promised greatness to come....
  • Shari Wampler
    1970-01-01
    Lost Empress by Sergio De La Pava623 pagesWhat’s it about? This novel takes in the world of professional football, Rikers Island, the medical world, and everything in-between. Nina Gill is the main protagonist. She is the daughter of the aging owner of the Dallas Cowboys- and Nina is a football whiz. Her brother outmaneuvers her for control of the team and her response is to beat him at his own game. She launches her indoor arena team as an alt...
  • Stu
    1970-01-01
    Look, this is a 600 page novel with a large cast of emotionally and philosophically distinct characters who wax and wane in terms of narrative importance and whose individual story arcs intersect with varying degrees of...uh, intersecting-ness, which is to say this is a darn challenging book to describe in any sort of manner that doesn't lean heavily on the blurb-speak crutch-words "sprawling" and "ambitious." And thematically, well, there is eno...
  • Steve
    1970-01-01
    20JUN18. Fifty pages in and enjoying myself quite a bit. SDLP has lost none of his sense of adventure and play. (Not wild about Nina cracking wise nearly every time she opens her mouth, but still.) My only real gripe, believe it or not, is physical: No matter what book I'm reading I do a lot of flipping back, but the deckled edge makes it maddeningly difficult. (Exasperated, I once used a circular saw to remove the deckled edge from a book. Did t...
  • Downward
    1970-01-01
    there's a lot of stylistic bravado in sergio de la pava's lost empress, which moves between three major storylines and inches them closer and closer together throughout the text until we get to a climax that is allllmost as big as it promises. the dialogue here strays from realism and moves toward a stylized screwball comedy wit with a lot of word play and quick cutting insults. plot wise whats going in is an investigation of the universal import...
  • Jonathanrwilson
    1970-01-01
    This book will not be for everyone. But, for me at least, de la Pava is aiming so much higher than just about everybody else that it's hard for me to rate this any lower. The intelligence that just comes screaming off of every page staggers me; what makes it special is that it's accompanied by just as much passion and clear love for humanity.A Naked Singularity remains my favorite book written in the past decade, and I ultimately found this book ...
  • Zach
    1970-01-01
    I didn't appreciate Gaddis until I listened to a performance of JR (it's on audible and it's spectacular). I would not have loved this book--a book that is a direct descendant of Gaddis' work--had I not listened to it performed by a cast of actors. De La Pava is an heir to Pynchon and Wallace, but he adds a perspective those two white men could not (and would not) try to appropriate: he's a former lawyer and a man of color. He also is hilarious a...
  • Matt Herman
    1970-01-01
    I really like his style, and overall I think I like how the story came together. The thing that caught me up is that a lot of the perspectives are a bit... not arrogant, but just so damn certain they're right. And when the book includes a lot of little derivations into philosophizing and science and football, it rubbed me the wrong way. I think the book throughout was trying to be ridiculous, to the point where that's kind of THE point, but it st...
  • Charlotte
    1970-01-01
    Best annoying book I've read in ages--when characters engage you, and plot lines set up possible trajectories for how things could proceed I prefer a more traditional approach. I won't include spoilers but the end does not satisfy. LOST EMPRESS does provide original characters, wild plotting, heart, humor and a genre mash-up (parallel universes that include Joni Mitchell and Radiohead? sure, why not).