Working IX to V by Vicki León

Working IX to V

Vicki Le?n, the popular author of the Uppity Women series (more than 335,000 in print), has turned her impressive writing and research skills to the entertaining and unusual array of the peculiar jobs, prized careers and passionate pursuits of ancient Greece and Rome.From Architect to Vicarius (a deputy or stand-in)-and everything in between-Working IX to V introduces readers to the most unique (dream incubator), most courageous (elephant command...


Details Working IX to V

TitleWorking IX to V
ISBN9780802715562
Author
Release DateJun 5th, 2007
PublisherWalker & Company
LanguageEnglish
GenreHistory, Nonfiction, Ancient History, Humor
Rating

Reviews Working IX to V

  • Katie
    2011-05-25
    If this book were food it would be salad. A big, generous, endless salad for lunch, with peas and tomatoes and cheese and onions and sprouts and garlic dressing and garbanzo beans. Do you like beets? It would have beets. Do you like arrugula? It would have arrugula. Only trouble is, it's so big, and you know it's too much, but you keep picking and nibbling and know you're going to get a stomachache later.Leon's sure done her homework here. I know...
  • Richard Derus
    2011-10-08
    Hell, what are we all complaining about?! At least we're not Roman aquarii, fishing around down in sewers or funeral clowns (we call those preachers these days) or bath slaves ewww ewww...a lot of careers in the ancient world weren't things that DeVry or Virginia College would prepare you for.Vicki Leon, in the course of researching the ancient world for serious books, would run across these weird or simply obscure references to jobs that no long...
  • Christine
    2012-04-06
    Not as good as Leon's other books, though her humor is still there. Intersting though. I would hate to be an arm hair picker.
  • Susanna - Censored by GoodReads
    2009-12-01
    A rather flippant guide to a variety of jobs from the ancient Greco-Roman world.For a further review: http://susannag.booklikes.com/post/62... .
  • Jenny Brown
    2012-02-15
    Tooth-achingly hip. The author has to drag in some current pop cultural reference on almost every page, as if she were terrified that readers might think her interest in ancient history means she was uncool. Uncool, apparently, also embraces anything that would hint at scholarship, like citing sources or not mixing up Greek and Roman references hundreds of years apart on a single page. Most of the information in the book is a stripped down, dumbe...
  • Iset
    2011-02-13
    Vicky Léon's book is specifically designed to inform the reader about the careers and jobs of ancient people, with a particular focus on Greek and Roman employment. Some of the careers are fairly standard, for example the charioteer, physician, farmer and cook. Others are decidedly more obscure and little studied, such as the jobs of clock watcher, amulet maker, garum manufacturer, silphium importer and gymnasiarch. The book is packed with descr...
  • Sterlingcindysu
    2016-06-19
    Another great book for reading pool-side (or come to think of it, a great bathroom companion!). I agree with the Goodreads community that this is a strong 3.5. Read best in bits and pieces. A lot of ancient Roman info is packed in these pages and Leon does a great job of breaking it up with humorous drawings, biographies, and background info on everyday life. The idea that they oiled up their bodies ALL the time made sense when you realized there...
  • MAP
    2013-02-28
    For a little fluffy book, this was remarkably dense.I think the main issue with it is that she doesn't just cover one culture (Greeks, Romans) but instead opted to cover SEVERAL cultures. Because of this we never really get a sense of what role the jobs played in the ancient culture or how they fit into the larger social tapestry -- because there simply wasn't enough time to explore full, rich explanations of 5+ different ancient cultures. So eve...
  • Kathy Petersen
    2008-04-29
    Leon romps through the environs of the ancient world to explore how we might have been employed centuries ago. "Ancient" seems to be anywhere from the 2nd century BC to about 300 AD, and the world is primarily Greco-Roman with some other cultures occasionally wandering in. Although her research seems quite solid and competent and her information credible, she opts for clever bantering rather than serious discussion. It's all very light-hearted. I...
  • Craig Patton
    2013-05-15
    Fantastic book! As a lover of history I am drawn more to the everyday of the common person as I believe this is a way for us in our modern time to connect to those who lived so far in the past.The best thing about this book is one gets learn about the type of jobs/careers that were available at the height of the Greek and Roman empires, many of which are, thankfully, no longer around today.This book is also great for those who don't like to read ...
  • Sumi
    2008-03-21
    A very humorous look at jobs in Ancient Rome written in a style that is easier to read than just about any history book. Unfortunately sometimes so much cleverness can also get in the way of true enjoyment. I wish the auther had sprinkled her wit a little less heavily. There is some good information buried within each entry, though and that's another thing in the book's favor.
  • Nicole Yovanoff
    2013-01-17
    From the title I thought it would be an interesting read about weird jobs in ancient Rome and Greece, instead it was more about jobs in general. A little disappointing.Not a bad read, but I found it lacking at times. Good information, but sometimes I felt the author was trying too hard to be funny when that is not her strength.
  • Colin
    2009-08-31
    A fun yet scholarly look at professions from the ancient world (primarily Greco-Roman cultures). Worth a look and a laugh; I do wish the book cited specific sources of information at times - but then, the book would be at least twice the size it is.
  • Kara
    2008-07-06
    A hilarious look into what it was like to be one of the working class in the ancient world. Written in a breezy style, but everything is well researched.
  • Abigail
    2017-05-09
    This book is one that is good for perusal rather than being read cover to cover. The main thing I got from is is that there's nothing new under the sun. As long as there have been people, there have been certain professions, and even if the professions aren't exactly the same, there are still many similarities to modern day life and professions.This book is an interesting look into the culture of ancient Greek and Rome. My one major complaint is ...
  • Liza Gilbert
    2011-06-14
    I understand why the publisher put "orgy planners" and "funeral clowns" in the title, but the most unique aspect of Leon's romp through the ancient world was the discussion of jobs they had that we still have today...and just how different they were back then.Quite honestly, this book has done more to educate me on ancient Rome and Greece than anything I read in college. Leon's humor is biting and the sarcasm flows like wine - sometimes a little ...
  • Natalie
    2012-12-12
    I have a degree in History and am generally interested in topics of this kind but I just couldn't slog through this book. There is nothing wrong with it per se, its just page after page of job descriptions from ancient times. Of course, this is how the title describes the book, so thats fine, but the problme is that each job description was about a paragraph long. This book didn't really dig deep on any one topic so it reads like a book of movie ...
  • Sue Bursztynski
    2011-04-02
    A very funny and entertaining tour of the subject of work in ancient Greece and Rome. Some of the stories I knew already, such as the one about Phryne the courtesan (but not that she was the ancient Greek equivalent of a hillbilly) but it was a fascinating and informative read and now I've rread it I will be putting it on my reference shelves for the next time I need to do some research for a book or story. Did you know they didn't actually have ...
  • Jeremy
    2009-08-10
    Funny, lighthearted read that really delved pretty deeply into the history and culture of ancient Greece and Rome. It was actually pretty interesting to see that some things never change, that some professions truly have been around forever and that some (thankfully) have gone by the wayside.The stuff about Rome was especially cool, since I'd actually been there and seen a lot of the city. It's a great read for someone looking for something enter...
  • Marie
    2012-07-10
    Full of amusing tidbits about ancient life divided up into two-page entries, this is a good coffee-table book for trivia buffs. One of the rare history books that knows how to lighten up and appeal to non-scholars. Good idea-sparker for historical novelists, too - lots of odd vocations and larger-than-life characters.I can understand why historians might scowl at the quick summaries and breezy tone. But I think the world needs more history books ...
  • Andy Oram
    2018-11-18
    León makes history fun, but her books represent real scholarship. From this one you can glean wonderful insights about everyday live (which is supposed to be the concern of modern history), such as how food got XSto crowded, major cities, how the imposing large structures of ancient cities were built, how slaves got freed and sometimes made fortunes, how music interacted with festivals and even war, and so forth. León does her best to distingui...
  • Mark
    2013-05-05
    Not painful but not really to my tastes. Short chapters covering one profession after another in ancient times, focusing more on the gossipy tidbits than historical context.I think I was expecting a more serious approach with a "sexy" title imposed by the publisher, but the title capture the tone pretty well.Might have enjoyed it slightly more if it were *not* on an e-reader, flipping through randomly instead of reading cover to cover.
  • Kevin
    2018-11-25
    A kind of encyclopedia of ancient Roman (and some Greek) occupations, written in a broad, comedic style. Many of the jobs are familiar to usteacher, cobbler. Others, not so muchpullarius, who interpreted the movements of the militarys sacred chickens. Kind of interesting for 20 pages or so, but then the authors tone became annoying. The kind of book youll pick and read for a few pages then put down, but I didnt pick it back up again. A kind of ...
  • Bernadette
    2009-03-16
    This book was very entertaining. One of the best jobs listed in this book was a "Gymnasiarch". The person who held this position was filthy rich and was responsible for supplying olive oil to the gymnasiums so people could slather themselves with it and scrape it off with a dull metal blade. It apparently wasn't easy to get the steady supply of oil and if a person was successful in this position they were loved throughout the city. Those Romans.....
  • Ari
    2009-12-08
    This book is made up of short (often less than a page) descriptions of the jobs people held in the ancient world. It foregoes serious discussion and depth, for quantity of entries. If you're looking for something short, undemanding, and amusing this is a good choice. If you were hoping for more detailed information, use this book the way you do Wikipedia, to gain just enough information to know better what you're looking for.
  • Laura Floyd
    2011-07-28
    Woooo! Three years later, I finished one of my back-up reads! Having taken three years to read this sucker, I am able to make this sharp observation: the writing is entertaining and the sound-bytes of history are entertaining, but on the whole, utterly forgettable. Any time I forgot to use a bookmark, I had to do serious fishing to figure out whether I'd read this bit or that bit already.
  • Gail
    2011-01-10
    Do you have a mental picture of the citizens of ancient Rome as those stodgy old folks walking around in togas, waging war, waxing philosophical, and writing sometimes tedious poetry and history, then this is a book for you. The variety of human experiences in the days of the empire, told in a very litrate, upscale "For Dummies" style, is informative, comical, and intriguing. Highly recommended.
  • Danielle
    2017-08-15
    This was a fantastic book! Vicki Leon does an exceptional job explaining the many jobs in the ancient world, and she's easy to understand. I personally enjoyed the stories about specific people she included - they made the book even more enjoyable. Definitely a must-read for anyone interested in classics!
  • Aishe
    2013-04-18
    I took forever to read this short book, because I loved it. Seriously, I just keep dragging it out, reading it bit by bit. Friends made fun of me, asking why I was still reading that same book as a month ago. It was fun and fascinating and made me want to learn a little Latin, not all those cases and conjugations, though!