Falling Free (Vorkosigan Saga, #4) by Lois McMaster Bujold

Falling Free (Vorkosigan Saga, #4)

Leo Graf was an effective engineer. Safety regs weren't just the rule book he swore by; he'd helped write them. All that changed on his assignment to the Cay Habitat. Leo was profoundly uneasy with the corporate exploitation of his bright new students... until that exploitation turned to something much worse. He hadn't anticipated a situation where the right thing to do was neither safe, nor in the rules...Leo Graf adopted a thousand quaddies---n...


Details Falling Free (Vorkosigan Saga, #4)

TitleFalling Free (Vorkosigan Saga, #4)
Author
Release DateSep 30th, 2004
PublisherNesfa
LanguageEnglish
GenreScience Fiction, Fiction, Space, Space Opera
Rating

Reviews Falling Free (Vorkosigan Saga, #4)

  • Choko
    1970-01-01
    *** 4.25 *** "... “On the sixth day God saw He couldn't do it all, so He created ENGINEERS” ..." Evgeny and I decided to read the whole series together:) It turned out to be a great decision:):):) I just closed the last page and needed to get on here and say how much I enjoyed this book! It is the first one I read by this author and now I am wondering why I never read her books before? After all, I was raised on Sci-Fi and Fantasy, this shoul...
  • Bradley
    1970-01-01
    Update 10/3/17 Re-readI think I just relaxed into this read, knowing damn well that it was going to be a novel of revolution against corporate idiots and assholes. Understanding that this came out in '88 goes a long way to grooving to the sense of hate and loathing we all felt during that time period. Or is that just me? Maybe it's just me.Fortunately, I love the Children's Crusade and the RAH feel, from the Can-Do engineering and idealistic gruf...
  • Evgeny
    1970-01-01
    An Engineer dies and goes to hell. He's hot and miserable, so he decides to take action. The A/C has been busted for a long time, so he fixes it. Things cool down quickly.The moving walkway motor jammed, so he unjams it. People can get from place to place more easily.The TV was grainy and unclear, so he fixes the connection to the Satellite dish and now they get hundreds of high def channels.One day, God decides to look down on Hell to see how hi...
  • Trish
    1970-01-01
    No fate but what we make.That could be the motto for this story and I loved the concept. This is a quite old scifi book, belonging to a quite long series. But it didn't show in the way I first thought. The story is about an engineer arriving on a space station in order to teach some employees of the company he works for as well. When he arrives, however, he discovers that the students are children and genetically altered ones at that. The worst, ...
  • mark monday
    1970-01-01
    engineer encounters hideous situation involving exploitation of a unique group of workers. engineer fights against this hideous situation.so this is really a 2 star book, whatever, I'm giving it 3 stars because yeah I liked it, and more importantly I would never give 2 stars to a friend and at this point I kinda feel like Lois McMaster Bujold is my friend. I've been working my way back and forth through her Vorkosigan Saga and I think that not on...
  • Justine
    1970-01-01
    Shockingly, my first book by the prolific and decorated Lois McMaster Bujold, but definitely not my last.This was really enjoyable for me. I sometimes struggle with older SF, finding it a bit stiff and not as expressively written as I prefer. That wasn't the case here. I loved the compact story that builds up at the end for an exciting conclusion. The characters were quite nicely done, and were an interestingly different combination of both the s...
  • Daniel
    1970-01-01
    Prvo imamo Dreamweaver's Dilemma interesantnu pričicu o opsnostima nove tehnologije prikazane kroz blago detektivsku priču. Simpatično ili u suštini ništa posebno.Druga priča, Falling Free, je daleko interesantnija pošto se bavi grupom modifikovanih ljudi, dece zapravo, i njihovom borbom za svoju budućnost. Ima dobrih momenata, likovi su interesantni jedino što nikako nisma imao osećaj veličine date stanice kao ni da ima puno osoba na ...
  • Stuart
    1970-01-01
    Falling Free: Enjoyable early novel, but not quite up to Miles Vorkosigan standardsI believe this is the first of Bujold's books to win a major SF award and bring her name into the spotlight, as most military SF Baen books had not been aiming for major recognition (in my opinion), but it got me started on the Miles Vorkosigan series and it's a bit of a mystery why I never actually read/listened to it till 30 years after publication! Still, better...
  • Jim
    1970-01-01
    This is first in chronological order of the Vorkosigan Saga save for the short story Dreamweaver's Dilemma. I now have all the audio books lined up. I've read most of them in published order, but read them generally as they were published, which is a different order & has stretched out for many years. I've never tried them in audio format, but thought them well suited. I was right.This deals with the origins of the Quaddies, a race that was first...
  • Clouds
    1970-01-01
    - Falling Free is the 11th Vorkosigan Saga novel I've read- So far... I've been delighted to give 3 of those 5 stars- Happy to give 6 of them a very solid 4 stars - Only Shards of Honour has gotten a 3 stars from me (before now)- Despite being a Nebula award winner, I'd say this is the weakest Bujold I've read.That's not to say Falling Free is bad - 3 stars is defined as "liked it" and I certainly did that (I read most of it in one sitting in...
  • Apatt
    1970-01-01
    Falling Free is one of several Hugo winners for Lois McMaster Bujold, she is practically sci-fi’s counterpart to Meryl Streep in term of awards. This book is set in her popular Vorkosigan universe but does not have any Vorkosigan in it, not even a mention. In the time setting of this book Miles Vorkosigan will not be born for another 200 years. However, this does not mean this book is like a cup of coffee without any coffee in it, it is well wo...
  • Lightreads
    1970-01-01
    A few hundred years before the events of the Vorkosigan books, a galactic corporation genetically engineered the Quaddies, people perfectly suited to zero gravity engineering and construction work because of their extra pair of arms instead of legs. A human engineer comes aboard the project, and through a series of events which do not need exploring at this juncture he finds himself spearheading nothing less than a revolution in a desperate bid t...
  • Wanda
    1970-01-01
    Actual rating: 3.5 stars.This book reminded me strongly of C.J. Cherryh’s book Downbelow Station. In both books a huge intergalactic company is using and abusing a population of people who are considered somehow “less than” humans. In DbS, it was an alien race, the Hisa (also known as Downers in human slang). Here in Falling Free it is the quaddies, the result of human genome manipulation, who have four arms instead of two arms & two legs, ...
  • Lindsay
    1970-01-01
    This is the start of my chronological read of the Vorkosigan books. I have read many of them previously, but out of order. This is my first exposure to Falling Free and despite some minor issues, I think it's held up pretty well.Leo Graf is a testing engineer whose latest posting at the Cay Habitat leads to some surprises. The people he's come to teach zero-G engineering practicalities to are an engineered variety of human: free-fall adapted "qua...
  • Veronique
    1970-01-01
    "If you ever have to make a choice between learning and inspiration, boy, choose learning. It works more of the time."If you're interested in science fiction, you will eventually hear of Bujold and her Vorkosigan Saga. Falling Free is the first title in the chronological order and my first forray into this author's world. Yes, it has an old fashioned aspect (it was written in the late 1980s), perhaps due to the cringing mysoginy and racism. Stere...
  • Cathy (cathepsut)
    1970-01-01
    Our intrepid engineer Leo starts a new job and gets to know genetically engineered humans--optimized for life in free fall, with another set of arms instead of legs. Fittingly they are called quaddies. They are also treated as something less than human and our engineer finds himself in the position of wanting to help the underdogs.This hasn't aged well. It feels pretty old-fashioned and quite a little sexist. If you can get past that, the story i...
  • David
    1970-01-01
    Leo Graf is an engineer, assigned to a space habitat to teach advanced welding techniques. Residing in the space habitat are a thousand young and very young quaddies, genetically engineered with no legs but four arms and hands to be especially well adapted for working in a gravitation-free environment. Everything at first seems fine, except that the director is inhumane. He looks at the quaddies as if they are mutants, they are property of his co...
  • Sara J. (kefuwa)
    1970-01-01
    Reading the Vorkosigan Saga in internal publication order except for Falling Free which I am reading between Cordelia's Honor & Young Miles. Read as part of the Miles, Mutants and Microbes Omnibus. I really appreciate Bujold's characters. Going into this I was wondering whether I would enjoy it after all the Cordelia and Aral we had in Shards & Barrayar. But, nope, my fears were unfounded as Bujold just pulled another one out of her hat! Likeable...
  • Ivana Books Are Magic
    1970-01-01
    This is my first ( and so far the only novel) by Lois McMaster that I have read. I don't know anything about Vorkosigan saga nor about this author save the fact that she got a Nebula award for this novel, which I happen to think she deserved. I’m not sure will I explore this saga or not. I mean, taken the fact how much I was impressed by this novel, sure I would love to but with so many books on my reading list, who knows? In any case, this rev...
  • Rob
    1970-01-01
    Executive Summary: Much like Ethan of Athos this one had a very strange premise. I thought it was alright, but I'm hoping the series focuses on Miles again soon.Audiobook: Grover Gardner does another good job. When you're not sure about a book, having a good narrator can be a big help. Full Review I had issues with this book. It wasn't the idea of Quaddies themselves, but the idea of genetically engineering what are essentially slaves. Leo was a ...
  • Kat Hooper
    1970-01-01
    Falling Free is an early stand-alone story in Lois McMaster Bujold’s VORKOSIGAN SAGA. It takes place before the events we read about in the other books and tells the story of the Quaddies, those genetically engineered “mutants” who have four arms and no legs and who, therefore, make good workers for zero-gravity situations. They were created in secret by a corporation who is using them as free labor.The story starts when Leo Graf, an engine...
  • Megan Baxter
    1970-01-01
    I found Falling Free to be an extremely stressful book to read! Around the halfway mark, I was dreading picking it up, as I wasn't sure how much more I could take of quaddie mistreatment. I started to give myself permission to just read a chapter at a time, instead of pushing for 100 pages. Luckily, shortly after that, the quaddies started fighting back, and I got right back into the swing of it. I just don't deal well with lack of agency.Note: T...
  • Denise
    1970-01-01
    Well done mix of science and conflict with a few important moral questions added to the mix. Is Bujold an engineer??
  • Kaethe
    1970-01-01
    If you like your scifi chock full of clever engineers, then you'd be hard pressed to come up with a better story. Clever people solving problems cleverly: that's the stuff I love, anyway. So, not at all like Scalzi's Fuzzy Nation or Ocean's Eleven, but satisfying in that same way. Now all I have to do is figure out which of Bujold's many books I should read next. Feel free to recommend your favorites.Library copy
  • j
    1970-01-01
    Four thumbs up!
  • Abbey
    1970-01-01
    BOTTOM LINE: Written in 1988, this is, chronologically, the first in the Miles series, and is a prequel that feels very 1950s in tone and style. Taking place almost entirely on a spacestation and with a very peculiar crew, it's both traditional and, with her own twists, somewhat innovative, making this a wonderful introduction to this long and very popular series.This prequel to the Vorkosigan saga takes place a couple of hundred years prior to M...
  • Misha
    1970-01-01
    One thing I love about Bujold is that there is a moral rightness and/or righteousness to her work. She also writes about the workplace and politics so, so well.Here, for example, is a gem:"And those who can't teach, Leo finished silently, go into administration." This book is largely about a race of genetically modified children who can exist well in zero gravity environments. Bujold attacks the kinds of thinking in individuals and corporations/b...
  • Geoff
    1970-01-01
    My first foray into the Vorkosigan Saga from Lois McMaster Bujold was very enjoyable. There were moral dilemmas, engineers, genetic engineering and megalomaniac bosses. Despite it being a book with a relatively small-in-scope story, you can see the larger world peaking in from references made by the characters.I'm reading the series in 'internal chronological' order. Mainly because Bujold herself recommends doing so. Falling Free is set many year...
  • Trish
    1970-01-01
    Escape from slavery meets heist story!I wasn't sure what to expect from this, but it had some very cool ideas. Now to read the first couple of the Vorkosigan Saga proper.
  • Khaalidah Muhammad-Ali
    1970-01-01
    Falling Free is part of the Vorkosigan Saga, although I can't (yet) see the connection. I've read both Shards of Honor and Barrayar, the next two books in the saga and Falling Free does not appear to relate, but that is just fine, because I liked this tale.Leo Graf, our main protagonist, is an engineer who is sent to work at the Cay Habitat in zero gravity with a group of very intelligent yet emotionally naive Quaddies. Quaddies are genetically e...