رباعيات خيام by Omar Khayyám

رباعيات خيام

The rubaiyat are a series of poems or 'stanzas' by the famous 12th century Persian atronomer and philosopherThe Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám (Persian: رباعیات عمر خیام‎) is the title that Edward FitzGerald gave to his translation of a selection of poems, originally written in Persian and numbering about a thousand, attributed to Omar Khayyám (1048–1131), a Persian poet, mathematician and astronomer. A ruba'i is a two-line stanza...


Details رباعيات خيام

Titleرباعيات خيام
Author
Release DateDec 27th, 2019
LanguagePersian
GenrePoetry, Classics, Philosophy, Literature, Fiction
Rating

Reviews رباعيات خيام

  • Ahmad Sharabiani
    2008-04-21
    The Ruba'iyat of Omar Khayyam, Omar Khayyám, Edward FitzGerald (Translator)Written 1120 A.C.E. Omar Khayyam was born at Naishapur in Khorassan in the latter half of Eleventh Century, and died within the First Quarter of Twelfth Century. I Wake! For the Sun, who scatter'd into flight The Stars before him from the Field of Night,Drives Night along with them from Heav'n, and strikes The Sultan's Turret with a Shaft of Light.II Before the phantom of...
  • Ahmad Sharabiani
    2009-07-28
    Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, Omar KhayyamOmar Khayyam was born at Naishapur in Khorassan in the latter half of Eleventh, and died within the First Quarter of Twelfth Century. The Slender Story of his Life is curiously twined about that of two other very considerable Figures in their Time and Country: one of whom tells the Story of all Three. This was Nizam ul Mulk, Vizier to Alp Arslan the Son, and Malik Shah the Grandson, of Toghrul Beg the Tartar,...
  • Ahmad Sharabiani
    2009-08-04
    The Ruba'iyat of Omar Khayyam, Omar Khayyám, Edward FitzGerald (Translator)Omar Khayyám was a Persian polymath, mathematician, philosopher, astronomer, physician, and poet. He wrote treatises on mechanics, geography, and music. His significance as a philosopher and teacher, and his few remaining philosophical works, have not received the same attention as his scientific and poetic writings. Zamakhshari referred to him as “the philosopher of t...
  • Manny
    2010-02-14
    I kept thinking about the Rubaiyat last week while I was translating Zep's Happy Sex. I understand that Fitzgerald's translation is extremely non-literal, and almost amounts to a new poem - there is a nice piece by Borges discussing this unusual collaboration between two poets from different cultures and centuries. But what are you supposed to do when you translate poetry? Literal translation seems pointless. I had similar problems while trying t...
  • Ahmad Sharabiani
    2014-01-21
    The Ruba'iyat of Omar Khayyam, Omar Khayyám, Edward FitzGerald (Translator)Written 1120 A.C.E. Omar Khayyam was born at Naishapur in Khorassan in the latter half of Eleventh Century, and died within the First Quarter of Twelfth Century. I Wake! For the Sun, who scatter'd into flight The Stars before him from the Field of Night,Drives Night along with them from Heav'n, and strikes The Sultan's Turret with a Shaft of Light.II Before the phantom of...
  • MihaElla
    2019-07-12
    A great Sufi poet, Omar Khayyam, has written in his Ruba’iyat, his world-famous collection of poetry: "I am going to drink, to dance, to love. I am going to commit every kind of sin because I trust God is compassionate -- he will forgive. My sins are very small; his forgiveness is immense."He was a famous mathematician too, renowned in his country. Omar Khayyam's book was burned in his day. Whenever a copy was found, it was burned by the priest...
  • Ahmad Sharabiani
    2008-04-28
    The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám is the title that Edward FitzGerald gave to his translation of a selection of poems, originally written in Persian and numbering about a thousand, attributed to Omar Khayyám (1048–1131), a Persian poet, mathematician and astronomer. A Ruba'i is a two-line stanza with two parts (or hemstitch) per line, hence the word rubáiyát (derived from the Arabic language root for "Four"), meaning "Quatrains". IWake! For th...
  • Marilyn Hartl
    2010-06-06
    In 1942, when my father was in the South Pacific, he asked for only one thing for Christmas...this book of poetry. My mother sent it to him with an inscription in the frontispiece which spoke wistfully of days to come. Later, he sent her a photo of him, reading this book, leaning back on a palm tree, with a bottle of wine and a loaf of bread on the cloth beside him...on the back of the photo, he wrote, "...all I'm missing is thou..."Obviously, th...
  • Roy Lotz
    2014-02-05
    I feel a bit awkward reviewing a book this short, so I’ll keep my review short as well. There are some very fine verses here, especially good to read before a night of drunken foolery. Although FitzGerald’s translation is known for being somewhat inaccurate, I wouldn’t even consider trading it for a more scrupulous edition. Instead, why not view the poems as an artistic collaboration between two great poets, across time and space?When small...
  • Rosa Jamali
    2008-07-13
    It wasn't easy to praise wine and create SEIZE THE DAY theme in twelfth-century Iran just after a long time that Baghdad had ruled in Iran and had bullied a nation by the name of religion; though inspiring enough!!! A big civilization is going to be extinct if they no longer use their own alphabet for writing in Arabic had been highly suggested!...Now it's high time that an autonomous Persian government is going to be established which could revi...
  • Shivam Chaturvedi
    2015-07-13
    If you were ever to compile the different odes to alcohol (there are likely to be very many in different languages and dialects, recited in different stages of inebriation), then this would have to rank right at the very top. The beauty and wonder with which Omar Khayyam has constructed his poem is a joy to behold. The comparisons stun you, for you'd have never seen it that way before. You almost get the feeling that you're sitting in one of thos...
  • Florencia
    2019-03-12
    What is most vital is that Fitzgerald completely misconstrued the meaning of the Persian mystic. He regarded Khayaam’s poem as a statement of hedonism and atheism… Graves discloses, on the contrary, that the poem expresses profound religious faith. Perhaps Fitzgerald lacked sufficient knowledge of Persian. Perhaps the symbolism of the Rubaiyyat simply eluded him.Excerpt from the "original" Rubaiyyat which isn't original at all and perhaps tha...
  • Zanna
    2015-10-16
    First, let Orientalism be taken as read. Fitzgerald has not translated Khayyam's poetry, rather has appropriated some of the substance, stripped context from it, shaped it to the white gaze. As Said discusses, his work is regarded as a kind of mining, extracting the raw elements and then refining them to make real art, something an "Oriental" is presumed incapable of. Fitzgerald apparently had a genuine passion for Khayyam's work, but the prefa...
  • Nandakishore Varma
    2011-10-25
    I first read this as a child of maybe 11-12 and could make neither head nor tail out of it. But the book (which belonged to my great-uncle) had impressive illustrations for each quatrain, and this drew me in. It was only much later that I could appreciate the beauty of Fitzgerald's language (yes, I am talking about the Fitzgerald translation, which I understand is almost an original work by itself).Awake! For the sun in the bowl of nightHas flung...
  • Himanshu
    2015-12-24
    And when like her, oh Saki, you shall passAmong the Guests Star-scatter'd on the Grass,And in your joyous errand reach the spotWhere I made One-turn down an empty Glass! *Heading to the bar in all drunkenness of Khayyam's swiveling wisdom*
  • David
    2008-08-11
    Some poetry snobs find these verses corny, with their psuedo-archaism of langauge and what nowadays would be called Orientalist romanticism.To Hell with all that. I've always liked them. In fact, I memorized most of it when I was a kid."The moving Finger writes, and having writ, Moves on, nor all your Piety nor WitShall lure it back to cancel Half a Line,Nor all your Tears wash out a Word of it."Yadda yadda.__________Incidntally, Omar Khayyam was...
  • Jon Nakapalau
    2016-10-16
    “The moving hand once having writ moves on. Nor all thy piety nor wit can lure it back to cancel half a line.” Some of the most beautiful poetry I have ever read...I read this book when I feel down and always find a line or two that lifts me up.
  • Ahmad Sharabiani
    2009-07-28
    Wake! For the sun, who scatter'd into flightThe stars before bim from the field of Night, Drives Nighit along with them from heav'n, and strikes,The Soltan's Turret with a Shaft of Light. Khayyam
  • Ekib
    2012-08-22
    Childhood favourite. "Come, fill thy cup and in the fire of spring,The winter garment of repentance fling;The bird of time has but a little way to fly And lo, the bird is on the wing."
  • Stian
    2013-07-13
    This book is a wonderful collection of translations of the Rubáiyát. The classic Edward FitzGerald-translation is wonderful. The McCarthy-translation is elegant and strangely reminiscent of the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius (at least for me). This is the most comperehensive of the three translations, and so needless to say it contains a lot more wine! The last of the three is Richard Le Gallienne's translation, which is my favourite. Le Gallie...
  • Wsm
    2015-11-25
    It is brilliant,awesome,majestic.Too good for words.No matter how many times I read it,it leaves me awestruck.FitzGerald took liberties with the original text.Could it be that FitzGerald's work is better than that of Omar Khayyam ? It's possible.
  • Madeline
    2008-05-18
    As is the case with most poetry, a good chunk of this book went over my head, but I really liked the parts I understood. "Oh threats of Hell and Hopes of Paradise!One thing at least is certain - This life flies;One thing is certain and the rest is Lies;The Flower that once has blown for ever dies.Strange, is it not? that of the myriads whoBefore us pass'd the door of Darkness through,Not one returns to tell us of the Road,Which to discover we mus...
  • Khashayar Mohammadi
    2016-05-25
    No one can make Nihilism make more spiritual and mystical than Khayyam! Warning, might cause Alcoholism.
  • Selim
    2016-04-08
    "Don't seek to recall yesterday that is pastNor refine for tomorrow which has not yet comeDon't build your hopes on the past or the future Be happy now and don't live on wind"
  • Steven Peterson
    2009-05-25
    Many years ago, I purchased the Fitzgerald translation of "The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam," a wise man who was born and died in Naishapur in the later 11th and early 12th centuries. Omar was a scientist of the day, studying astronomy. He was also part of a team selected to revise the calendar.The "Rubaiyat" itself is a series of four line stanzas, following one another in ". . .a strange succession of Grave and Gay." Here are some of the more affec...
  • Heather Fryling
    2015-03-25
    I read it and I read it and I read it. I love these poems. I love this translation. They never fail to inspire me with the beauty and fragility of life, and they're all the more thrilling for evoking ancient Persia.
  • Sleepydrummer
    2018-08-29
    "A Book of Verses underneath the Bough,A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread, — and ThouBeside me singing in the Wilderness —Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow!"The short and sweet of it; 'tis a cute little book.