The New Yorker Stories by Ann Beattie

The New Yorker Stories

When Ann Beattie began publishing short stories in The New Yorker in the mid-seventies, she emerged with a voice so original, and so uncannily precise and prescient in its assessment of her characters’ drift and narcissism, that she was instantly celebrated as a voice of her generation. Her name became an adjective: Beattiesque. Subtle, wry, and unnerving, she is a master observer of the unraveling of the American family, and also of the myriad...


Details The New Yorker Stories

TitleThe New Yorker Stories
ISBN9781439168745
Author
Release DateNov 16th, 2010
PublisherScribner
LanguageEnglish
GenreShort Stories, Fiction, Literature, Unfinished, The United States Of America, Anthologies, Collections, Fantasy, Literary Fiction, Female Authors
Rating

Reviews The New Yorker Stories

  • Courtney
    1970-01-01
    This was my first introduction to Ann Beattie, and I was blown away. The first stories in this collection are among the best that I've ever read. She captures the qualities of the 70's so profoundly, that I feel like I now know everything I need to about that era (which I'm sure is not true). The stories are simple and quiet, but packed with frank emotion and human flaw. They are truly beautiful.
  • Kimber
    1970-01-01
    I am half-ashamed to have not previously have read Ann Beattie. Her writing has an amazing quality of being humorous but profound at the same time, of having pathos and lightness at once. The characters have such a light touch, and yet they astounded me in their realness. (Compare these short stories in their aliveness to some full length novels filled with half-dead characters.)A Beattie story is character driven, slice of life vignettes which a...
  • switterbug (Betsey)
    1970-01-01
    I am a late bloomer to Ann Beattie's austere and edgy short stories, and it proved favorable . Her minimalist style is for the veteran reader, and for those of us willing to ponder their poignancy like we would a numinous painting whose meaning is often beyond its containment and yet embedded there. Her photographic eye for surface details expose cracks and tensions that open to a scalding world of suffocation and denial. Her characters circumven...
  • Jillian
    1970-01-01
    Elegantly written stories about rich, educated, depressed people who are mostly divorced or in unhappy relationships. I found most of the characters cynical, apathetic and shallow. They seemed to dabble in things b/c they wanted to fit in, rather than experience them. Every female character seemed repressed, haughty and stuck between traditional values and romantic fantasies. I had a hard time liking or relating to them, although they are realist...
  • Jenny (Reading Envy)
    1970-01-01
    Is it me? No. I like short stories. Maybe it is the idea of compiling ALL stories into one volume. Annoyances get compounded, and things that don't work for me as a reader get magnified. Ann Beattie has won award with her stories. But they drive me crazy. Her characters are so damn passive. They live unfulfilling, slightly puzzling lives but never DO anything about them. They aren't even that interesting. No. Interesting happens to the people aro...
  • Josh Ang
    1970-01-01
    Ann Beattie’s minimalist writing takes some getting used to. The sparsity of her prose makes it look deceptively simple and flat, because it does not draw attention to itself – it reads so naturally that you tend to take it for granted. But when you really pay attention, you will be rewarded. Whenever I read a Beattie story, at-first seemingly innocuous passages jump out at me that make me scurry for a highlighter or pen to note it down. A tu...
  • Kathrin
    1970-01-01
    Bailed on this collection around 20% in. I was drudging my way through it and said to myself this morning, that I will try one more story and if I didn't like it, I will let this book go. The stories revolve to much around the same topics and topics that I am not interested in reading. Pretty much every couple in these stories is divorced.... I know a lot of people are getting divorced, but is this all we need to talk about? I donated the book to...
  • Eric
    1970-01-01
    To enjoy an Ann Beattie story, you must first absorb a sort of family tree which describes the relationships among members of a non-traditional family. For example, Man A's Mother (B), is dying. A is recently divorced from C, and has taken up with D (a young college student). E is C's son from a prior marriage, who still lives with A because he gets along better with A than with C. F is D's dog, Newton, who has very specific habits and quirks of ...
  • Michelle
    1970-01-01
    I love Ann Beattie’s writing style. It’s right up my alley – direct, unadorned, raw, beautiful. The ability to write a poignant, complete short story is astounding to me and Ms. Beattie clearly has a gift. This is a collection of all her New Yorker pieces spanning thirty years. While I tend to love a solid book of short stories I’ve come to the conclusion that a 500+ page collection is a bit much for me, especially when the stories aren...
  • Huyen Chip
    1970-01-01
    I really wanted to finish the book, but after 2 years of trying, I gave up. One must be a masochist to enjoy Ann Beattie's writing.
  • Judy
    1970-01-01
    This is more of a 3.5 book, but we don't have that option. A collection of 48 short stories, many of them very short, that were published in the New Yorker between 1974 and 2006. Most of the stories involve depressed people who are also rich, well-educated, and white. And most of them seem to be in an unfulfilling relationship, a bad marriage, or they are divorced. I know too many of these people in my real life so I was familiar with the type. T...
  • Cara Brackstone
    1970-01-01
    Anne Beattie is obviously a skilful writer and managed to capture a lot of realism in her short stories. But I was bored by the content and characters, who were mainly middle aged people unhappy with their relationships, doing dull and ordinary things. Persevered to finish, would not pick up again.
  • Cynthia
    1970-01-01
    These stories are so elegantly and beautifully written but some are quite depressing. I am slowly reading each one. It will probably take me quite some time to finish this. I find it difficult to read some of these stories at this time of year and many hit home a little too closely for comfort.
  • Ciara
    1970-01-01
    more like 2.5 stars.all i really have to say is that i am so relieved that i am finished reading this book. i got it from the library to read over the holiday break in boston, but i didn't have as much downtime to read there as i'd expected, & the book is so much longer than i'd anticipated. over 500 pages & i don't know how many stories...i'll estimate pi times infinity because that's what it felt like. then the library overdue notice system got...
  • Ashvin
    1970-01-01
    Update: I'm reading stories from this intermittently. They're all basically the same, so one can't really read them all at once. However, they're nice to come back to once in a while. I would suggest that you try and find a story for free online somewhere and, if you like it, consider getting this book. Just don't expect to like any of the characters. Just started reading it, and am liking it so far. It's a collection of short stories that is wel...
  • Andy Miller
    1970-01-01
    This is a collection of Ann Beattie short stories that were published in the New Yorker magazine between 1974 and 2006. They are autobiographical in that Beattie writes of characters that are the same age as she when she writes the story and the stories are set during the time of the writing. So the book starts with stories about 20 somethings dealing with the changing times of the 70s and ends with stories set in the 2000s about 50something char...
  • Jim
    1970-01-01
    This is quite a collection of short stories over the years that Ann had published in The New Yorker. I had read maybe a third of the stories in her short story collections. Some of the stories are great and some are just okay. For most all of her stories there is the strong and abrupt ending, fast introduction to characters, smooth flowing language that makes you reread a paragraph and say wow, how did she write that in so few words. After some s...
  • Jessica
    1970-01-01
    I was introduced to Ann Beattie in a literature class. I was initially annoyed at the introduction because I have never felt connected to short fiction and have always preferred novels. However, I found myself feeling very passionate about the one story I read of Beattie's and bought this book to find out more. I really enjoy her unique writing style and her interesting, close to home, themes. Many, if not most, of her stories cover dysfunctional...
  • Nick Duretta
    1970-01-01
    When she's firing on all cylinders, Ann Beattie is amazing. At the very least, she's always an artful artist, with an unerring sense of humanity and a limitless imagination. Her early stories, however, often seemed too arbitrary for me -- she assembles all the ingredients, but then just throws them down on the canvas without much of a purpose or pattern. Events succeed other events which succeed other events, and then the story ends. Many times I...
  • Steve
    1970-01-01
    I wish I could like Ann Beattie. In the forward, one reviewer called her voice “original and precise”. I can see the precision in her writing, and the clarity of her characters. But I could not sustain interest past the first few stories. Part of it is my fault. Right now, I really have a preference for stories with some humor or some science fiction. This world is sad and oppressive enough. I’d like to hear from someone who has read this a...
  • Aaron Jacobs
    1970-01-01
    More like 3.5 stars but good enough that I rounded up. The stories from the late '70s are excellent, the most successful in this collection. By the mid-80s she'd pared down her style and these stories, all of which are five or six pages, read more like vignettes lacking the emotional heft of her earlier work. From then on, the stories are hit or miss, though even when she misses it's not by that much. The writing is strong throughout.
  • Connie
    1970-01-01
    I am a long time fan of this author and I was excited to to see this thick book full of her stories. I took this book on vacation to the beach a couple of months ago and really enjoyed reading all of these stories. It was interesting to have such a long range of time (early 70's until present day) of stories...her overall style remains the same throughout the decades. Definitely recommend.
  • Frank
    1970-01-01
    Ann Beattie has a wonderful gift for observation. These stories are beautifully and delicately crafted, a la JC Oates. They invite concentrated reflection. Yet they are more like a series of studies than a collection of short stories. The unremitting focus on lonely, broken people and aimless drifters first wearies, then enervates.
  • Sharon
    1970-01-01
    Classic Beattie. Her stories capture perfectly the jaded ennui of NYC residents over a span of four decades. A satisfying collection for literary junkies who take a sort of anthropological approach to reading contemporary fiction set in NYC.
  • Elizabeth Kennedy
    1970-01-01
    In brief, this collection includes sad stories about unhappy people in disintegrating (or disintegrated) relationships. Beattie's minimalistic, sharp style held my interest though.
  • Dieuwke
    1970-01-01
    Great short stories, to be read one at a time. I started off with an early one, then jumped to one of her last ones, to see if I could detect any change (that could supposedly be called "growth", though who am I to judge?) but although there's stories that resonate more and there's ones that simply resonate less with me, it looks like she was a winner right from the beginning.Only point of critique, as inevitable with a collection this big, is th...
  • Keili Rae
    1970-01-01
    very lovely writing--who am i to judge? but i wanted to read ann beattie because i'd heard her mentioned in conjunction with lydia davis, and at the end of the day, i prefered lydia davis. it's not a competition, but ann beattie's subjects and characters were a little too mundane for me, like suburban white people who are vaguely disappointed with their lives but not enough to do anything about it. that's a thing, but it's just not that fun to re...
  • Andrew Peterson
    1970-01-01
    Everyone is divorced, or having affairs, or both -- after the first dozen stories it became a bit much. Yet I pressed on (and off), reading more to observe and (with hope) absorb Beattie's remarkable, distinctive craft. The last seven or eight stories, "Coping Stones" in particular, made it worth the effort. I'll add her Maine Stories to my queue.
  • Wendi Enright
    1970-01-01
    I LOVE short stories, but this was just too much by the same author. I'd love a New Yorker Stories volume with various authors. Read it over the course of more than a year to try to break up some of the sense of familiarity with some of the stories.
  • Bookmarks Magazine
    1970-01-01
    While all critics professed respect for Ann Beattie's significant influence on the American short story, how they reviewed her New Yorker collection depended on how much they really liked her minimalist style -- one often devoid of tone, emotion, and cultural signposts. The San Francisco Chronicle categorized reaction to her work in three ways: "masterful," "resistant and chilly," or perhaps "both." Appreciation, it seems, is a matter of literary...
  • Bistra Ivanova
    1970-01-01
    Може би е добре да си призная, че започнах книгата малко по грешка :-) Мислех си, че тези 500+ страници са колекция от най-добрите разкази, публикувани в Ню Йоркър, от различни автори, а Ан Бийти е съставител или нещо от сорта. Е, оказа се, че разказите въ...
  • Brad Hodges
    1970-01-01
    The New Yorker Stories, by Ann Beattie, is just what it sounds like: a collection of all of her stories published in that august magazine, from 1974 to 2006. I think I went about reading it the wrong way, though it was from necessity; since I checked the book out from the library I had a limited time to read the 48 stories contained within, so I had to read them in bunches. Ideally, they should have been read one per day. When reading them in bun...
  • Kathryn Bashaar
    1970-01-01
    Ann Beattie is a very respected short-story writer, so maybe the fault is with me, not her, but I didn't like this book at all. I read three stories and just gave up, because only one of them (the most recent) was even mildly interesting to me. The main reason that short fiction no longer has mass popularity is that it's been replaced by 30-60 minute TV episodes. But another reason might be because it's hard to find short fiction that would appea...
  • Pratheep Nair
    1970-01-01
    When it's every writer's dream to get at least one short story published in the New Yorker in their lifetime, it would've been kind of deja vu for Ann Beattie. How could someone write in such detail the mundane things of life without making the readers lose their attention? The best thing about these stories is when you finish reading them you ask the question, "What was the story about?" Unlike the sterotype stories, these don't have heavy plots...
  • christopher
    1970-01-01
    i kept looking forward to reading from this book. when i started reading this book i felt like i could know more about stories than i ever have. i felt really good while reading this book. i think that because i felt like this that i tried to read really slowly, in order to drag that feeling out.i feel more positively towards the work i accomplished while reading this book than i do the work i accomplished while not reading this book. some of the...
  • Miriam Jacobs
    1970-01-01
    This collection of approximately 35 years of Beattie stories gets better and better as you read along. Engaging with a writer's growth is nearly always rewarding. You watch him/her learn, evolve, and the activity becomes, in a way, free lessons in the craft as well as an opportunity to think things through - important things - with someone you like. I've done it with several writers - Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Roth, Monroe, Twain, Salinger, Kingsolv...
  • Clare
    1970-01-01
    Beattie is considered "a master of the short story" and she probably is. I am not fond of short stories because I like to settle in for a good long read with a cup or two of coffee and some potato chips (weird combination but it works for me). I read some of the stories in this collection and thought, "Yah, so what?" which could be because of my general lack of interest in the genre or because the stories do not have a beginning, middle, and end....
  • Jonathan Rimorin
    1970-01-01
    These stories are for the most part quite samey, quite riveting: young people, though they don't seem so young, often they're in their 20s, but already in their second sometimes third marriages, often downtrodden, downwardly mobile, that's if they move at all. Their conversations are affectless, as their actions often are. Some times things happen in these stories and that's mysterious. More often nothing happens in these stories and that's even ...
  • Dona
    1970-01-01
    These stories were important to me when they were first published in The New Yorker, beginning in 1974. In my view, Ann Beattie gave a voice to the experiences of young women in America who were like me. It was exciting to me to see my generation reflected in fiction in The New Yorker. Beattie had a major impact on the success of the minimalist short story movement in the 1980s.
  • Beth
    1970-01-01
    A good book for a dieter. Sort of like being addicted to cabbage — bitter, smooth, bland, and crunchy. Little nutritional value, but you can’t stop eating it. Her short stories pack a lot of complexity into very little space but after digesting them, I don’t think I gained anything.
  • Meghana
    1970-01-01
    This collection of longish stories turned out to be surprisingly hard to get through. Ann Beattie, who I've never read before, has a raw, piercing writing style. Her stories chronicle daily life and its mundane events, without ever slipping into banality or repetition. Some of her stories really spoke deeply to me; but most of them seemed anti-climactic, the characters could have used more literary development, and they failed to make much impact...
  • Maddie Holden
    1970-01-01
    This book is an enjoyable read...up to a point. Some of the stories were really good, and others weren't as great, mostly because it seemed like the author was trying too hard to bring a deeper meaning or message to them. Most of the stories end abruptly, sometimes leaving you disappointed, sometimes confused...but the best stories leave you reflecting. For these, I found myself musing over the characters and their relationships, hit by the clear...
  • Carrie
    1970-01-01
    This book is like broccoli. I should like it; it's good for me; I can think it's okay in small portions, but too much leaves me feeling sluggish and bloated. Make something happen to these characters that are so well drawn, damnit!
  • Carol
    1970-01-01
    Some stories were excellent, and some so impenetrable that five very sophisticated readers could not figure out what the stories meant. The last stories are the best - straightforward, and psychologically satisfying
  • Kendall
    1970-01-01
    Yep, I still love short stories, and Ann Beattie's voice is spot on. My only criticism is that some of the characters start resembling one another from different stories - partially because she re-uses names. I was extra excited after noting all the Charlottesville/Ruckersville/Waynesboro references and then seeing in her bio that she's an English professor at UVa. Wahoowa!
  • Lauri
    1970-01-01
    I like the writing style...short, sweet and to the point...no rambling on and on and on...but, it seems that every single story was depressing and about people who just wouldn't take charge of their lives or anything else. I certainly don't mind reading stories like that, but every. single. story. in. the entire. book. is a bit much. I found myself trying everything from gently cheering the characters on to wanting to slap them upside their heads...
  • shannon
    1970-01-01
    read over half. that's... enough. because the book about killer unicorns just showed up at the library, as did the memoir about the rich lady who got laid off by conde nast and is now all super happy now that she doesn't have to work.