Free to Choose by Milton Friedman

Free to Choose

The international bestseller on the extent to which personal freedom has been eroded by government regulations and agencies while personal prosperity has been undermined by government spending and economic controls. New Foreword by the Authors; Index.


Details Free to Choose

TitleFree to Choose
ISBN9780156334600
Author
Release DateNov 26th, 1990
PublisherMariner Books
LanguageEnglish
GenreEconomics, Nonfiction, Politics, Philosophy, Business, History
Rating

Reviews Free to Choose

  • David Dort
    1970-01-01
    Written in 1979, one of the libertarian economist(s) Friedmans' most accessible works, the clear-written and thought-provoking work does not require the reader to agree with Mr. Friedman's assertions to enjoy it. Rather, it requires the reader to ferociously wrack their brain for a counter argument or alternative solution to their assertions that governmental controls over economic freedoms (by regulation, price and wage controls, nationalization...
  • Jeremy
    1970-01-01
    I really enjoyed this book, and it confirmed some of my fears that I am really a libertarian at heart.The basic premise is that people should be free to make their own choices whenever possible, and that government's role is to protect us from each other, and not to protect us from ourselves.The Friedmans argue from a pragmatic standpoint more than from a philosophical standpoint. Generally, government does a poor job with what it touches. We hav...
  • Aaron
    1970-01-01
    Wow! It took me a month to read this book!!! I suppose it does take longer to read a book for learning and (not) enjoyment reasons. Funny thing is, I actually enjoyed reading this book too! There are even occasional bits of humor that sneak up on you. (This is illustrated by a reference to Cognac during an explanation on historical forms of currency). Literally, every page of this book had a quote you’d want to slap on Facebook. It was that goo...
  • Alvaro Berrios
    1970-01-01
    Although this book was written in 1979, it is still one of the best books anyone can read and the information is still completely relevant to what is going on today in our country. If you hate big government you will love it as it will support many of your beliefs. If you love big government you should read it regardless because many of your pre-held ideas can be dispelled as what is often blamed on the free market is, in reality, the fault of mi...
  • Amber
    1970-01-01
    A bit dry but an absolute necessity for understanding Libertarian thought and recommendations. A little out of date as well, though a lot of the concepts have been either been seriously considered on a national level or are still being discussed today. While I don't agree with everything the Friedman's posit, I do understand how their belief in the market model leads them to believe in the power of the "rational" individual (if such a thing exist...
  • Patrick Peterson
    1970-01-01
    Very good book, but not great. Excellent companion to the TV series of the same name that exposed Milton and free market ideas (mostly) to many, many people.I read this shortly after the TV series came out in 1980.Read Ludwig von Mises or Murray Rothbard to compare and contrast the Chicagoan/monetarist/positivist Friedman vs. the Austrian/more consistently free market ideas.
  • Erik Graff
    1970-01-01
    This book was assigned for Capitalism, Democracy, Socialism taught at Loyola University Chicago during the first semester of 1981/82 by David Schweickart. It infuriated me at the time, appearing to be an intellectually dishonest apologetic for the existing class divisions in the United States. I was more impressed by the author during a subsequent reading of his Capitalism and Freedom.
  • Jonathan
    1970-01-01
    Really a good book, which gives the insight of economy, free market, trade unions, education, bureaucracy, policies etc.,Also gives us the idea why we require above subjects into consideration.
  • Clinton
    1970-01-01
    Free to Choose posits the efficacy of subduing government intervention in a free enterprise market economy by rendering theoretical remedies that would alleviate government failures through more competition and personal freedom; ultimately, it would eliminate gratuitous taxes.Freidman addresses some of the most problematic issues facing our nation that are unfortunately still prevalent today such as inflation, bad school systems, Social Security,...
  • Adam
    1970-01-01
    While some of his arguments could be stronger, this book is important because there aren't enough books that make those arguments—that free markets and capitalism have value. Many people look at equality and fairness as one of two things: as an outcome, or as a process. Both equality of outcome and equality of process cannot be simultaneously achieved. That is an unrealizable and utopian vision. Equality of outcome and equality of process are i...
  • David
    1970-01-01
    Even though I am not completely convinced that Mr. Friedman is correct in all of his assertions, I must give this book four stars as work of literature.First the positives: Milton Friedman once again proves his skill with words and logic in this brilliantly articulated book. It is hard to read through his arguments and not become all but convinced that he is correct in almost every subject. He carefully lays out the often unforeseen chains of eve...
  • James
    1970-01-01
    I bought this book back in the "good old days" when you could purchase a hardcover book for less than ten dollars. Due to the inflationary policies that Milton Friedman warns about, and that he provides a cure for, a comparable book today carries a price tag more than double the price of the book I purchased. It was a good investment. In the book, Milton Friedman and his wife discuss the principles of the Free Market. It is this discussion, based...
  • Jey
    1970-01-01
    It can be disconcerting to find that you have finished a book but can't really explain what it was about much. That is how I feel about Free to Choose. Yes, this is an economics book, so I can say that it is about economics. I can tell you that the main point here seemed to be that the free market is good, but America is (was, it was written in 1980) at a turning point and will soon have to make a decision about which economic policy it should ad...
  • Alex Timberman
    1970-01-01
    I love the way Milton Friedman argues. He stakes his position and charmingly disposes of opposing views. You can get a sense of his intellect and charm by watching some of his debates on YouTube. This book goes over several issues like welfare, minimum wage, and education where he prescribes the correct policy based on free-market fundamentals – hence the title of the book “Free to Choose.” Some of the issues seem outdated and I would not b...
  • Davidmcdonnell
    1970-01-01
    Common sense. This book makes a clear, rational case for the free market. Friedman dedicates a chapter to each of the major issues facing our country, including education, energy, taxes, and the environmental movement (the book was written in 1979 but the arguments on both sides of the issues still resonate today). Similar to Thomas Sowell, Ayn Rand, or Thomas Dilorenzo, Friedman champions the individual over the group, arguing that when people h...
  • Lucía Vijil Saybe
    1970-01-01
    El nobel de economìa del 76, deja al descubierto que los mercados competitivos generan mayore desarrollo y crecimiento de la economìa de un paìs sin la intervenciòn del estado. Los chicago boys, generaron a travès de los tiempos las medidas fiscales y en algùn momento las monetarias màs rìgidas sobrepasando la dignidad del ser humano, el caso de la dictadura de Pinochet con recomendaciones de los chicago mejorò su economìa pero a costa ...
  • Tom Stamper
    1970-01-01
    This is such a seminal work on free market economics that you will be surprised to hear examples and stories that you already know in other literature. Friedman's example of how many strangers it takes to make a pencil and how no one person can make it on his own is a classic. His proposal of the negative income tax is also the basis of much later study and theory. If the only thing you took from this book is the government's role in inflation it...
  • Emily O.
    1970-01-01
    This book taught me quite a bit about economics and how the free market is capable of "working things out" better than any other system. There were some things I disagreed with, but for the most part, I agreed with this book and enjoyed reading it. It was eye-opening, the explanations were comprehensive, and the data was sufficient to convince me. This book embraces the values of freedom and the right to pursue our own destiny that America holds ...
  • Jasonlylescampbell
    1970-01-01
    So far really getting a lot out of this book. It is very clear and opens up a lot of arguments I have not read. For example, I thought the images of the government as umpire vs. parent on page 5 was a good debate. I would lean toward umpire, but have to think that the deregulation and problems in the financial industries, drug industries and for profit schools and prisons are an example where the umpire is failing to call foul. Then in chapter on...
  • JP
    1970-01-01
    A very effective conveyance of the meaning of free market economics and its value to the consumer. The opening quote is from Justice Louis Brandeis' opinion in Olmstead v. United States: "Experience should teach us to be most on our guard to protect liberty when the government's purposes are beneficial. Men born to freedom are naturally alert to repel invasion of their liberty by evil-minded rulers. The greater dangers to liberty lurk in insidiou...
  • Krishna Kumar
    1970-01-01
    This book is one of the most well-written and impassioned argument for laissez faire. The Friedmans demonstrate how government interference can create inefficiencies in the market that can be exploited by special interest groups. They discuss how government spending, however well-meaning, can degenerate into huge bureaucracies that fail to achieve their objectives, but keep requiring huge budgets.The basic problem with a book like “Free to Choo...
  • Derek Neighbors
    1970-01-01
    The say, "The truth will set you free, but first it will piss you off." Friedman's 1980 work is able to do just that. Milton won the Noble Memorial Prize in Economics in 1978. Free to Choose highlights free market economics and the forces that destroy them. So much good and relevant data in here that it is hard to believe it was written almost 40 years ago.The part that rings true is that almost every instance of "free market" being cited as the ...
  • Stanley Arthur
    1970-01-01
    This is arguably viewed as the best work of the two legendary free market economists from the University of Chicago "Chicago School" of economic theory, Milton and Rose Friedman. The so called "freshwater" approach to economics has been contrasted with the "saltwater" views of Stanford, Harvard and MIT.Ok, so it was written and published in 1980. But the free market approach to managing the economy is even more relevant today as we watch the fail...
  • Jason
    1970-01-01
    A fervent believer of Adam Smith's ideologies, Milton Friedman portrayed a compelling argument, from both a economic/moral standpoint for free enterprise. Furthermore, he breaks down his argument to show how intervention has negatively impacted different aspects of the economy and society. However, the picture that he painted, in my opinion, is far too perfect. I do not believe that the free markets are perfect. It MAY be the best solution as of ...
  • Tyler
    1970-01-01
    Synopsis: Milton and Rose Friedman published this personal statement back in 1979 and many of their beliefs still ring true today. The Miltons advocate for a free market and smaller government (i.e. fewer regulations) and support their arguments with stories and examples.My Review: To be honest, it has been a few months since I finished this book and I don't remember a whole lot about it... What I do remember is that the book is very readable and...
  • Giff Zimmerman
    1970-01-01
    This is a crisply written description of libertarian economic thinking. The arguments are mostly very compelling, except perhaps when the authors oversimplify, confuse causes and effects, base their arguments solely on biased anecdotes (ignoring obvious counter-anecdotes), or take their rationale a step or two too far. The subsequent 36 years of history have also been unkind to certain of those arguments (e.g., tax increases do not automatically ...
  • Bader Alhashel
    1970-01-01
    This is a very fascinating political economy book from a Nobel laureate and one of the major economists in the last century. The book presents the argument for free markets and libertarianism. The book argues for free markets by tacking several of the major economic issues in our world such as union, tariffs, social security, and consumer protection. I highly encourage anyone with an interest in politics or economics to read this book regardless ...
  • Jenny Free
    1970-01-01
    Found most of the information in this book to be painstakingly obvious, or strange. If you've taken an Econ class or two and paid attention, you probably already know what's going to be said--especially if you had a conservative professor. The only surprising things said in the book seem to be a bit off. For example, his claims about monopolies being practically non-existent in early US history do not seem to match up with what really happened (u...
  • Martin
    1970-01-01
    Great book. Lays out a dozen basic macroeconomic truths with data and examples and reasoning so that even the non-economist can understand. Although written in 1980, the chapters on minimum wage, growth of government, and bureaucracy remain dead on.The book covers much of the same material as Capitalism and Freedom, but here it is better written, more sharply defined, and brought down a notch or two in terms of technical detail, making it easier ...
  • Nicole Geub
    1970-01-01
    interesting but more likely infuriating at best. I'm not into economics or politics and it pains me to see and read about current events so this book just wasn't really my cup of tea. but knowing what I know and hearing about his ideas on how a "well governed" society should function I see his good ideas but know that the system won't ever work like that in these modern times. for a system to work the people should decide and let the politicians ...